Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

Where Minds meet and Ideas pop up !

TEN POINT WEBSITE EVALUATION CHECKLIST

(Developed from the system of the Poynter Institute)
● AUTHORITY: Is this a recognised expert, or a body with a known reputation?
● AFFILIATION: Is the site connected with a reputable person or organisation?
● ACCURACY: If you can spot mistakes while reading the site, then start worrying.
● APPEARANCE: Is the site well put together? A reliable site may look old-fashioned, but a
sloppy or amateurish presentation could indicate an individual, or some flyby-
night operation.
● COMPREHENSIBILITY: Does it make sense? (But remember: people writing in a second
language may be less clear than native speakers.)
● CURRENCY: Is it up-to-date?
● LINKS: Look at respected sites on the subject: do they link to the one you are
examining?
● PAGE RANK: If you use a Google Toolbar, it will offer a 1-10 rank on how a page is
regarded on the web. Several other search services offer such rankings.
● OBJECTIVITY: Are there signs of bias?
● CREDIBILITY: A simple test: do you believe it? Does common sense tell you it is true?
Don’t feel you should use these criteria every time you check out a site; just be aware of the
pitfalls.

Filed under: How to evaluate a website?,

Design a jacket for next(?) HP book

A competition on designing a book jacket for the next Harry Potter book conducted on 30th July 2008 in the library as part of Harry Potter birthday celebrations. 31st July happens to be Harry’s birthday.

A Harry Potter trivia Quiz with a short introduction to the books was held in the morning assembly on 31st July, 2008

The Competition

Filed under: Reader's Club, ,

Harry Potter Birthday Celebrations

Exhibition of Harry Potter Books

30th July to 01 August

Filed under: Reader's Club

NCERT Journals

Online NCERT Journals

Filed under: New Periodicals,

More Jokes

What did one book say to the other one?
I just wanted to see if we are on the same page
(Thanks to Anonymous)
Why didn’t the burglar break into the library?
Because he was afraid he’d get a long sentence.
(Thanks to West Leeman
Why do authors always get good marks on tests?
They know how to copy-right.
(Thanks to Nancy Schimmel)
Where was the librarian when the lights went out?
In the dark!
(Thanks to Marlin Day)
What does the librarian say when she has to leave?
Time to book!
(Thanks to Marlin Day)
What did the book called “Chills” say to the other book?
“I feel chills running down my spine!”
(Thanks to Anonymous)
What is a book’s favorite food?
A bookworm.
(Thanks to Cody S., age 10)
What do the library computers like to eat for snacks?
Chips.
What do you get when you cross an elephant with a computer?
A lot of memory.
What part of a computer does an astronaut like best?
The space bar.
Why did the computer sneeze?
It had a virus.
Where do computers take their pets when they get sick?
To the Intervet.
What is a computer’s favorite kind of music?
Disk-o
What did one math book say to the other math book?
“Do you want to hear my problems?”
What do planets like to read?
Comet books.
How do librarians file melted marshmallows?
According to the Gooey (Dewey) Decimal System.
What did the spider do inside the library computer?
It made a Web page.
When the cold wind blows, what does a book do?
It puts on a book jacket.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel!
Why does the dragon keep turning around in a circle?
He wants to read a long tale.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel!
How do you catch computer fish?
Two ways: on line or in the Net.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel!
What does Hagrid use on the 18th hole of the Hogwarts Golf Course?
His Harry Putter.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel!
Where do sticks of chewing gum go when they go online?
On the Mint-ernet.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel and Emi Kafton-Minkel!
When the squirrels sneak into the library to use the computers, where do they go?
On the Inter-nut.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel and Emi Kafton-Minkel!
What do you call a campground for spiders?
A Web site.
(Thanks to Matt Willette, age 8!
Where are there more nobles than in the royal court?
In the library. All the books have titles.
When a knight read a book, who was always at his side?
His page.
(Thanks to Walter Minkel!)
What do you do if a dragon bites your library book?
Take the words right out of his mouth.
When spiders go on the Internet, what do they visit first?
Charlotte’s Web site.
What’s the difference between an accountant and a dectective solving the Case of the Stolen Book?
One’s a bookkeeper and one’s a bookcaper.
Why did Dr. Jekyll cross the road in front of the library?
To get to the other Hyde.
(Thanks to Kate Booker!)
Why did the librarian slip and fall on the library floor?
Because she was in the non-friction section.
(Thanks to Alan Mandel!)
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Cardigan.
Cardigan who?
Oh, no! I went to the library and forgot my card-igan!
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Snow.
Snow who?
Snow better place to hang out during the winter than the library!
Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Clothes on.
Clothes on who?
The library’s clothes on Thanksgiving, but we’ll be open again on Friday!
Why did the vampire check out a drawing book?
He wanted to learn how to draw blood.
Librarian: Knock knock.
Student: Who’s there?
Librarian: Winnie.
Student: Winnie who?
Librarian: Winnie you going to bring back that overdue book, hm?
What does a library book wear whenever it leaves the building?
A pager.
Why was the T-Rex afraid to go to the library?
Because her books were 60 million years overdue.
Why is that library book you’re trying to find always in the last place you look?
Because once you find it, you stop looking.
Why does an elephant use his trunk as a bookmark?
That way he always nose where he stopped reading.
(Thanks to Emi Kafton-Minkel!)
How can you tell if an elephant checked out a library book before you did?
When you open it, peanut shells fall out.
Why does the ghost come back to the library every day for more books?
Because she goes through them too quickly.
Why did Silly Willy wait until summer to take back his overdue books?
Because that’s when the fine weather is.
Why didn’t the skeleton come back to the library with an overdue book?
He was too gutless.
(Thanks to Thomas A. Brown!)
Why don’t elephants ever pay overdue fines?
They always bring their books back on time. An elephant never forgets!
(Thanks to Emi Kafton-Minkel!)
What did the detective do when he didn’t believe the librarian’s story?
He booked her!
(Thanks to Millie from Northern California!)
Do you know how many librarians it takes to screw in a light bulb?
No, but I know where you can look it up!
What king of medieval England was famous because he spent so many nights at his Round Table writing books?
King Author!
What reference book should you put on your head to keep off the sun and rain, no matter where you go in the world?
A hat-las (if you like, you can call it your “map cap”).
What reference book should you use when you forget your shovel?
The dig-tionary.
What reference book is the best to use when you want to travel?
The bicycle-opedia!
Librarian: Knock knock.
Kid: Who’s there?
Librarian: Winnie Thupp.
Kid: Winnie Thupp who?
Librarian: He’s in the juvenile fiction, and so is Piglet!
When a goose goes to the library, what books does she look for?
Peoplebumps books!
If you travel to Eastern Europe, why won’t you find any books in Prague’s public library?
They’re all “Czech”ed out!
How do you make a library float?
Get a million gallons of root beer, two scoops of ice cream, and add one library!
(Thanks to David Boe!)
Who writes invisible books?
A ghost writer!
(Thanks to Carolyn Gray!)
Part 1: What building has the most stories?
The library, of course!
Part 2: If a student goes to a seven-story library and checks out seven books, how many are left?
None. The library had only seven stories!
(Thanks to Christine Talbert!)
Where does a librarian sleep?
Between the covers.
When a librarian goes fishing, what goes on her hook?
A bookworm, of course.
What does a librarian eat dinner from?
A bookplate.
Jim said, “My dog tried to eat my library book.”
“What did you do?” asked the librarian.
“I took the words right out of his mouth.”
(Thanks to Leo MacLeod!)
What does the skeleton do when she goes to the library?
She likes to “bone up” on her favorite subject (and we’re not ribbing you, either).
What does a librarian use to keep his pants up?
A book-kle.
What does the mummy do when he goes to the library?
He gets all wrapped up in a good book.
What do you call a person whose library books are overdue?
A bookkeeper.
What did the book called “Chills” say to the other book?
“I feel chills running running down my spine.”

Filed under: library Jokes & Cartoons,

Jokes

Why did the librarian slip and fall on the library floor?
Because she was in the non-friction section.

Knock knock.
Who’s there?
Clothes on.
Clothes on who?
The Library’s clothes on Thanksgiving,
but we’ll be open again on Friday!

Why did the vampire check out a drawing book?
He wanted to learn how to draw blood.

Librarian: Knock knock.
Student: Who’s there?
Librarian: Winnie.
Student: Winnie who?
Librarian: Winnie you going to bring back
that overdue book, hmm?

Q. Why was the T-Rex afraid to go to the library?
A: Because her books were 60 million years overdue.

Q. Why is that library book you’re trying to find always in the last place you look? A. Because once you find it, you stop looking.

Q. Why does an elephant use his trunk as a bookmark?
A. That way he always nose where he stopped reading.

Q. How can you tell if an elephant checked out a library book before you did?
A. When you open it, peanut shells fall out.

Q. Why does the ghost come back to the library every day for more books?
A. Because she goes through them too quickly.

Q. Why didn’t the skeleton come back to the library with an overdue book?
A. He was too gutless.

Q. Why don’t elephants ever pay overdue fines?
A. They always bring their books back on time. An elephant never forgets!

Q. What did the detective do when he didn’t believe the librarian’s story?
A. He booked her!

Q. Do you know how many librarians it takes to screw in a light bulb?
A. No, but I know where you can look it up!

Q. What king of medieval England was famous because he spent so many nights at his Round Table writing books?
A. King Author!

Q. What reference book should you put on your head to keep off the sun and rain, no matter where you go in the world?
A. A hat-las. (If you like, you can call it your “map cap.”)

Q. What reference book should you use when you forget your shovel?
A. The dig-tionary.

Librarian: Knock knock.
Kid: Who’s there?
Librarian: Winnie Thupp.
Kid: Winnie Thupp who?
Librarian: He’s in the juvenile fiction, and so is Piglet!

Q. When a goose goes to the library, what books does she look for?
A. Peoplebumps books!

Q. If you travel to Eastern Europe, why won’t you find any books in
Prague’s public library?
A. They’re all “Czech”ed out!

Part 1: Q. What building has the most stories?
A. The library, of course!

Part 2: Q. If a student goes to a seven-story library
and checks out seven books, how many are left?
A. None. The library had only seven stories!

Q. Where does a librarian sleep?
A. Between the covers.

Q. When a librarian goes fishing, what goes on her hook?
A. A bookworm, of course.

Q. What does a librarian eat dinner from?
A. A bookplate.

Jim said, “My dog tried to eat my library book.”
“What did you do?” asked the librarian.
“I took the words right out of his mouth.”

Q. What does the skeleton do when she goes to the library?
A. She likes to “bone up” on her favorite subject
(and we’re not ribbing you, either).

Q. What does the Mummy do when he goes to the library?
A. He gets all wrapped up in a good book.

Dear Readers: I copied these jokes from the following site:
http://www.multnomah.lib.or.us/lib/kids/jokes.html
Go there to see the rest of them.

Filed under: library Jokes & Cartoons,

Harry Potter Book exhibition

Filed under: Exhibitions,Displays,

Da Vinci Code

Dawn Brown

(Now in our Library)

Spinning a Thriller From the Louvre

By JANET MASLIN

The word for “The Da Vinci Code” is a rare invertible palindrome. Rotated 180 degrees on a horizontal axis so that it is upside down, it denotes the maternal essence that is sometimes linked to the sport of soccer. Read right side up, it concisely conveys the kind of extreme enthusiasm with which this riddle-filled, code-breaking, exhilaratingly brainy thriller can be recommended.

That word is wow.

The author is Dan Brown (a name you will want to remember). In this gleefully erudite suspense novel, Mr. Brown takes the format he has been developing through three earlier novels and fine-tunes it to blockbuster perfection. Not since the advent of Harry Potter has an author so flagrantly delighted in leading readers on a breathless chase and coaxing them through hoops.

The first book by this onetime teacher, the 1998 “Digital Fortress,” had a foxy heroine named Susan Fletcher who was the National Security Agency’s head cryptographer. The second, “Deception Point,” involved NASA, a scientific ruse in the Arctic and Rachel Sexton, an intelligence analyst with a hairdo “long enough to be sexy, but short enough to remind you she was probably smarter than you.”

With “Angels and Demons,” Mr. Brown introduced Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbology who is loaded with “what his female colleagues referred to as an `erudite’ appeal.” No wonder: the new book finds the enormously likable Langdon pondering antimatter, the big-bang theory, the cult of the Illuminati and a threat to the Vatican, among other things. Yet this is merely a warm-up for the mind-boggling trickery that “The Da Vinci Code” has in store.

Consider the new book’s prologue, set in the Grand Gallery of the Louvre. (This is the kind of book that notices that this one gallery’s length is three times that of the Washington Monument.) It embroils a Caravaggio, an albino monk and a curator in a fight to the death. That’s a scene leaving little doubt that the author knows how to pique interest, as the curator, Jacques Saunière, fights for his life.

Desperately seizing the painting in order to activate the museum’s alarm system, Saunière succeeds in buying some time. And he uses these stolen moments — which are his last — to take off his clothes, draw a circle and arrange himself like the figure in Leonardo’s most famous drawing, “The Vitruvian Man.” And to leave behind an anagram and Fibonacci’s famous numerical series as clues.

Whatever this is about, it is enough to summon Langdon, who by now, he blushes to recall, has been described in an adoring magazine article as “Harrison Ford in Harris tweed.” Langdon’s latest manuscript, which “proposed some very unconventional interpretations of established religious iconography which would certainly be controversial,” is definitely germane.

Also soon on the scene is the cryptologist Sophie Neveu, a chip off the author’s earlier prototypes: “Unlike the waifish, cookie-cutter blondes that adorned Harvard dorm room walls, this woman was healthy with an unembellished beauty and genuineness that radiated a striking personal confidence.” Even if he had not contrived this entire story as a hunt for the Lost Sacred Feminine essence, women in particular would love Mr. Brown.

With Leonardo as co-conspirator, since his life and work were so fraught with symbols and secrets, Mr. Brown is off to the races. Google away: you may want to investigate the same matters that Langdon and Agent Neveu pursue as they tap into a mother lode of religious conspiracy theory. The Priory of Sion, the Knights Templar and the controversial Vatican prelature called Opus Dei are all invoked, as is the pentacle, the Divine Proportion, the strange sex rites glimpsed in the film “Eyes Wide Shut” and the Holy Grail. If you think the Grail is a cup, then Mr. Brown — drawing upon earlier controversial Grail theories involving 19th-century discoveries by a real Saunière — would like you to think again.

As in his “Angels and Demons,” this author is drawn to the place where empirical evidence and religious faith collide. And he creates a bracing exploration of this realm, one that is by no means sacrilegious, though it sharply challenges Vatican policy. As Langdon and Sophie follow clues planted by Leonardo, they arrive at some jaw-dropping suppositions, some of which bring “The Da Vinci Code” to the brink of overkill. But in the end Mr. Brown gracefully lays to rest all the questions he has raised.

The book moves at a breakneck pace, with the author seeming thoroughly to enjoy his contrivances. Virtually every chapter ends with a cliffhanger: not easy, considering the amount of plain old talking that gets done. And Sophie and Langdon are sent on the run, the better to churn up a thriller atmosphere. To their credit, they evade their pursuers as ingeniously as they do most everything else.

When being followed via a global positioning system, for instance, it is smart to send the sensor flying out a 40-foot window and lead pursuers to think you have done the same. Somehow the book manages to reconcile such derring-do with remarks like, “And did you know that if you divide the number of female bees by the number of male bees in any beehive in the world, you always get the same number?”

“The Da Vinci Code” is breezy enough even to make fun of its characters’ own cleverness. At one point Langdon is asked by his host whether he has hidden a sought-after treasure carefully enough. “Actually,” Langdon says, unable to hide his grin, “that depends on how often you dust under your couch.”

Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company | Privacy Policy

Filed under: Book of the week, ,

Young World Quiz

By V.V. RAMANAN (The Hindu)

QUESTIONS

1. In which sport is Ivan Lendl an icon?

2. Which fruit is also called Ananas, Nanas or Pina?

3.Which highly endangered carnivore’s diet is 99 per cent bamboo?

4. Which of these composers was not an Austrian: Mozart, Vivaldi and Brahms?

5. In Scrabble, what colour is the square that triples the letter score?

6. Alba is the Gaelic name for which European country?

7. According to the nursery rhyme, how much did the crooked cat cost the crooked man?

8. In Tom and Jerry cartoons, name the attractive female, white cat who is Tom’s usual love interest.

9. John Wilkes Booth was the assassin of…?

10. Name Bart Simpson’s paternal grandfather?

11. The Tupolev Tu-144 was the world’s first…?

12. What type of snake is usually shown on a pharaoh’s crown?

13. If you were in Tallinn, in which European country would you be in?

14. Where in the human body is the Girdle of Venus?

15. In chess, what is a ‘Adjust’?

ANSWERS

1. Tennis
2. Pineapple
3. Giant Panda
4. Vivaldi
5. Dark blue
6. Scotland
7. A crooked sixpence.
8. Toodles (Galore)
9. Abraham Lincoln
10. Abraham J. Simpson
11. Supersonic
12. Cobra
13. Estonia
14. Palm of the hand
15. Touching a piece without the intention of making a move

Filed under: Young World Quiz,

E-Quest

Questions

1. Peter Oppenheimer is the CFO of…?

2. Which media giant has filed a $1-billion copyright claim against Google and YouTube, a fact that has been publicly ridiculed by Google’s CEO?

3. The video portal from NBC Universal and News Corp. is called…?

4. Name the studio responsible for a movie like ‘Dirty Dancing’ and TV show like ‘Weeds’ that has signed a revenue-sharing deal with YouTube.

5. Which cyber-giant’s social-news site is called Propeller?

6. According to the ‘US Search Engine Performance Report: Q2 2008’ released recently, how much of every new dollar spent on search in Q2 2008 versus Q2 2007 went to Google?

7. What does ‘SaaS’ used as a model of software deployment stand for?

8. After which Spanish city was AMD’s first quad-core server processor named?

9. What was ‘The Last HOPE’ that was held recently?

10. With which famous TV brand has Amazon signed up to offer 40,000 movies and TV shows for a price?

Answers

1. Apple

2. Viacom

3. Hulu

4. Lions Gate Entertainment.

5. AOL

6. $1.10

7. Software as a Service.

8. Barcelona

9. It was the much touted seventh Hackers On Planet Earth conference!

10. Sony Bravia.

Filed under: YW-Cyber Quiz,

Teach junior to surf safely

By

R.K.Raghavan

My constant desire is, whatever I write should contribute at least marginally towards alleviating a few grave social problems that presently haunt us. I have, therefore, dealt with in this column — more frequently than I would want to — the growing complexity of protecting children from the smut that finds its way so easily these days into cyberspace.

This is something of an unequal task, as unequal as the modern policeman’s fight against conventional crime. Both endeavours require enormous perseverance and ingenuity, not to speak of high motivation and personal integrity.

I am convinced that more harmful material than we can ever imagine gets posted online, and the gullible surfer is unquestionably affected by it. The offenders are both those who exhort violence such as terrorism or indulge in traditional crime and those who peddle online pornography, especially obnoxious child images that have a roaring international market.

Many parents are proud of how computer-savvy their children are, without realising that this is a blessing as well as a curse. I am not, therefore, surprised that a recent UK survey, the Mobile Life Report, revealed that 87 per cent of respondents believed they were quite clued up about their wards’ surfing habits. About the same number opined that the latter did not access any material that their parents considered objectionable, and hence no controls at all were necessary to curb the surfing of their children.

As against this highly questionable complacence, about 25 per cent of those who went ahead to scrutinise the log of their children with access to the Internet admitted that there were definite grounds for concern. Of these, a few also said that they were cognizant of worrying incidents encountered by their young ones on cyberspace. On the whole, the survey revealed a certain complacence that I feel was unwarranted.

My own view is that, just as there is no need for paranoia about the dangers that lurk in cyberspace, certain circumspection is, in fact, prudent. This is what a clinical psychologist, who contributed to the Mobile Life survey, had possibly in mind, when she said that just as we teach children how to cross the road to avoid an accident, we need to impart education in online safety to them in an imaginative manner. Can there be anything more down-to-earth than this thoughtful exhortation to parents?

Swoop-down in australia

That I am speaking some sense should be clear from the fact that instances of pornography and online paedophilia continue to be reported from different parts of the globe. A few months ago, the Australian Federal Police revealed facts of a swoop on gangs operating across the country. Of the 70 arrested by them in this connection, at least one was a policeman, and several were teachers, all connected to the abominable trade in child images. The operation was sequel to the discovery of a European Web site that had displayed about 95 explicit pictures posted by a hacker.

This site, during a scrutiny that extended to 76 hours, received 12 million hits from about 1,50,000 users in 170 nations. More than 2,800 IP addresses were actually traced back to Australia itself and later identified by the Federal Police. Nothing can illustrate better the amazing international spread of the evil. More revealing was that the gangs involved were using all possible technology, including the Sony PlayStation and mobile phones, to download and transmit images from a mind boggling variety of Web sites, online communities and newsgroups.

Dangerous trend

Another shocking and widespread practice that has recently come to light is the tendency of some boys and girls to take nude pictures of themselves with the help of cell-phones and then exchanging them with friends.

This seems crazy and inexplicable, except perhaps by a child psychologist. To my untrained mind it suggests a juvenile desire to “show off”. Many States in the US have reported this strange phenomenon.

To be specific, in Santa Fe (Texas), school authorities seized a number of cell-phones from their students after nude pictures of two junior high school girls were found floating around the campus.

And in La Crosse (Texas), a 17-year-old boy was charged with child pornography, sexual exploitation of a child and defamation after he was caught posting objectionable pictures of an ex-girlfriend in MySpace.

Enquiry revealed that the victim girl herself had taken these with her cell phone and e-mailed them to the boy friend (when they were perhaps on good terms), who exploited them to wreak vengeance on the girl.

Recommendations of UK study

Consider all these happenings with the findings of a survey by Ofcom, UK’s telecom regulator, which found that nearly 50 per cent of children in the age-group 8-17 had their profiles posted in social networking sites, although they were under-aged to be allowed to do so. A large number of them had also set up the profile for a free view by anybody, and not merely their friends.

Most significantly, the UK government commissioned, in September 2007, a review of the risks involved in the exposure of children to inappropriate material on the Internet and video games. Led by Psychologist Tanya Brown, the six-month study, entitled Safer Children in a Digital World, came out in March 2008, with a series of most practical recommendations, generally endorsed by the government and Ofcom. The report was categorical that in no way could the Internet be made 100 per cent safe for the children, and there was need for government oversight and parental guidance.

It suggested the creation of a UK Council on Child Internet Safety, which would develop a two-fold strategy aimed at better regulation and better information and education. The Council would help to make the law on the subject clearer and explore better law enforcement response. A specific suggestion was that all computers sold to homes should carry easily operable parental control software, and ISPs should advertise and offer this when customers sign up.

Google lends a hand

Against this disconcerting picture of the Internet’s adverse impact on children, there is some positive news of governments the world over and some IT giants initiating action to check the trend.

For instance, the UK government, in an attempt to prevent paedophiles from grooming children on the Net, proposes communicating names and e-mail addresses of all registered child sex offenders to social networking sites so that the latter are barred from accessing such sites.

Also, in countries such as Brazil, with a large number of Orkut subscribers, Google has agreed to share private photo albums on Orkut with the police, in an attempt to bolster criminal investigation. Google has claimed that it has now in place, more effective image filters than before, in order to prevent uploading of child pornography.

The software developed by Google is stated to have a pattern recognition ability to sort and identify files containing child abuse material. Studying all these endeavours one gains the feeling that there is now abundant recognition of the perils of the Net to children who surf. Ultimately, however, the success of all exercises will rely heavily on educating parents and teachers on how to recognise danger and keep their wards away from it. Any long-term strategy, government or private, cannot succeed without such instruction.

The writer is a former CBI Director who is currently Adviser (Security) to TCS Ltd.

Related Stories:
Dangerous waters
Keep cyber sharks at bay

Courtesy:Business Line,29/07/2008

Filed under: Article of the Week, , , ,

New Arrivals

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LIBRARY MEDIA CENTRE

KENDRIYA VIDYALAYA PATTOM

New Books as on 25/07/2008

Call Number

Author

Title

294.3 KAS-G Kashyap, J Gautama Buddha
922.945 SHA-M Mahadevan, T M P Shankaracharya
321.4 LUC-D Lucas, J R Democracy and participation
320.954 DAS-P Das, B C Prelude to the presidency in India
577.5 VER-P4 Verma, P S; Agarwal, V K Principles of ecology: Environmental Biology
H 363.7 SHU-P Shukdev Prasad Paryavaran aur hum (h)
808.068 CLA.1 Classic tales for children, Book1
540 BHA-F Bhardwaj, R Formulae and definitions in chemistry
808.068 WIN-K Windridge, Charles Know science
577 KUM-G Kumar, H D General Ecology
T 4H0.7 CHA-S.08 Chaturvedi, Manik Govind Samkshipth Budhacharith: Kaksha aat keliye Hindi ki poorak padyapusthak (h)
823 CHR-M Christie, Agatha Murder on the Orient Express
808.068 JAY-S Jayanthi Manokaran Sunflowers and butterflies
808.068 RAM-L Ram, S K; Mason, J A Learning to communicate: Primer activity bookA
T 910 JOS-P.11.1 Joshi, K L, et al. Principles of geography, Part1: A textbook for class XI
808.068 HAN Hansel and gretel
T 530 ARV-P.12.2 Arvind Kumar, et al. Physics,Vol.2, Part2: A textbook for class XII
T 4H0.7 ANI-N.08.3 Anirudd Ray Naya jeevan, Bhag3: Kaksha aat keliye Hindi ki poorak padyapusthak (h)
808.068 LOU-M Louis, Liza Miracles of Jesus
808.068 THO-B Thomas, Cecilia Brave Five and other stories
792 SID-P Siddons, Suzy Presentation skills
823.01 JAG-F.2 Jagdish Sharma, Illu. Fables of Aesop, Book2
158.1 BLA-O Blanchard, Kenneth, et al. One minute manager meets the mokey
T 4H0.7 PRA-B.07.2 Pramodkumar Dubey, Ed. Bharathi, Bhag2: Saathveem kaksha keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 300 HAR-C.09 Hari Om, et al. Contemporary India: Textbook in social sciences for class IX
T 300 HAR-C.09 Hari Om, et al. Contemporary India: Textbook in social sciences for class IX
823 BLY-B Blyton, Enid Binkle and flip misbehave
808.068 TIN Tinkle digest
T 8H0.8 SNE-S.10.2 Snehalatha Prasad, Ed. Sahitya-manjari, Bhag-2: Kaksha 10 a padyakram keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 8H0.8 SNE-M.09.1 Snehalatha Prasad, Ed. Madhu-sanchay, Bhag-1: Kaksha 9 a padyakram keliye Hindi ki poorak padyapusthak (h)
155.25 BRA-I Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa Vidyalaya Inner beauty
T 4H0.7 PRA-B.07.2 Pramodkumar Dubey, Ed. Bharathi, Bhag2: Saathveem kaksha keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
372 KEN-S Kendriya vidyalaya sangathan Strengthening primary education: Targets, tools and techniques
372 KEN-S Kendriya vidyalaya sangathan Strengthening primary education: Targets, tools and techniques
372 KEN-S Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan Strengthening primary education: Targets, tools and techniques
372 KEN-S Kendriya vidyalaya sangathan Strengthening primary education: Targets, tools and techniques
372 KEN-S Kendriya vidyalaya sangathan Strengthening primary education: Targets, tools and techniques
330.954 RUD-I48 Ruddar Datt; Sundharam, K P M Indian economy
T 570.7 NCE-B.12 Singh, B D, et al. Biology: Textbook for class XII
T 4H0.7 PRA-B.08.3 Pramodkumar Dubey, Ed. Bharathi, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 4H0.7 SAT-B.05 Sathyendra Varma, Ed.; Latha Pandey, Ed. Bal bharathi, Bhag5: Kasha Panchveem keliye (h)
T 363.7 DAL-E.05 Daljit Gupta, et al. Environmental studies, let’s look around and learn: Textbook for class V
001.076 BAJ-C Bajaj, N K Complete Physics for All India Engineering Entrance Examination (AIEEE), 2005-2006
001.076 SAX-M36 Saxena, Ved Prakash, et al. Medical college entrance examination
001.076 SAX-E26 Saxena, Ved Prakash, et al. Engineering colleges entrance examination
T 954 MEE-M.11 Meenakshi Jain Medieval India: A textbook for class XI
T 420.7 SHA-L.05 Shabnam Sinha, Ed. Learning English: Textbook for class V
T 4H0.7 SAM-B.2 Samyukta Loodra; Satyendra Varma Bal bharathi, Bhag2 (h)
823 STI-R Stine, R L Goosebumps: Return to horrorland
808.068 RAM-T Ramesh, B G Tales from hithopadesha
808.068 SHA-W Shakespeare, Willam Winter’s tale
158.1 TIL-L Tillman, Diane; Hsu, Diana Living values activities for children ages 3-7
330.15 ROL-H Roll, Eric History of economic thought
330.1 DEW-E24 Dewett, Kewal Krishan; Gurucharan Singh Elementary economic theory
330.1 AHU-A14 Ahuja, H L Adavanced economic theory: Microeconomic analysis
338.5 SET-M20 Seth, M L Microeconomics: Value distribution and economic growth
T 300 ARJ-S14.10.1 Arjun Dev Social science, Part1: Textbook in history for class X
005.13C++ SUM-C4 Sumita Arora Computer science with C++
808.068 GRI-F Grimm, Brothers Fairy tales
823.01 POE-T Poe, Edgar Allan Tales of mystery and imagination
808.068 DAV-R Davidson, Susanna Rapunzel
808.068 DAV-C Davidson, Susanna Cinderella
T 510 NCE-M.03.3 NCERT Math-Magic, Book3: Textbook in Mathematics for class III
T 4H0.7 NCE-R.01 NCERT Rimchim-1: Pahali kaksha keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 300 SOC.06.1 Social Science, Our pasts-I, Textbook in history for class VI
T 510 NCE-M.03.3 NCERT Math-Magic, Book3: Textbook in Mathematics for class III
T 510 NCE-M.01.1 NCERT Math-Magic, Book1: Textbook in Mathematics for class I
T 510 NCE-M.01.1 NCERT Math-Magic, Book1: Textbook in Mathematics for class I
T 420.7 NCE-M.01.1 NCERT Marigold, Book1: Textbook in English for class I
823.01 DES-O De Souza, Eunice 101 folktales from India
823 KEE-H Keene, Carolyn Haunted bridge
823 KEE-S Keene, Carolyn Sky Phantom
T 420.7 NCE-M.01 NCERT Marigold: Textbook in English for class I
T 300 ARJ-S.07.1 Arjun Dev; Dev, Indira Arjun Social Science, Part1: Modern India, Textbook in history for class VII
T 4H0.7 NCE-R.02 NCERT Rimchim-2: Dooeesari kaksha keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 420.7 NCE-M.04.4 NCERT Marigold, Book4: Textbook in English for class IV
T 577.5 NCE-E.04 NCERT Environmental studies: Looking around, Textbook for class IV
T 657 NCE-A.11.1 NCERT Accountancy: Financial accounting, Part1: Textbook for class XI
375 CBS-S.09.1 CBSE Secondary school curriculum 2009, Vol.1: Main subjects: Effective from the academic session 2007-08 of class IX and for the Board examination (Class X) to be held in 2009
004 DIX-N Dixit, J B New approach to CBSE computer science for Class XII
T 363.7 NCE-L.04 NCERT Looking around, Environmental studies: Textbook for class V
T 363.7 NCE-L.04 NCERT Looking around, Environmental studies: Textbook for class V
T 363.7 NCE-L.04 NCERT Looking around, Environmental studies: Textbook for class V
T 363.7 NCE-L.04 NCERT Looking around, Environmental studies: Textbook for class V
T 363.7 NCE-L.04 NCERT Looking around, Environmental studies: Textbook for class V
T 500 GAU-S.08 NCERT Science: Textbook for class VIII
T 500 NCE-S NCERT Science: Textbook for class VIII
T 500 NCE-S NCERT Science: Textbook for class VIII
T 500 NCE-S NCERT Science: Textbook for class VIII
T 500 NCE-S NCERT Science: Textbook for class VIII
T 510 NCE-M NCERT Mathematics: Textbook for class VIII
T 510 NCE-M NCERT Mathematics: Textbook for class VIII
T 510 NCE-M NCERT Mathematics: Textbook for class VIII
T 510 NCE-M NCERT Mathematics: Textbook for class VIII
T 510 NCE-M NCERT Mathematics: Textbook for class VIII
T 915.4 NCE-S NCERT Social Science: Resource and development, Textbook in geography for class VIII
T 915.4 NCE-S NCERT Social Science: Resource and development, Textbook in geography for class VIII
T 915.4 NCE-S NCERT Social Science: Resource and development, Textbook in geography for class VIII
T 915.4 NCE-S NCERT Social Science: Resource and development, Textbook in geography for class VIII
T 915.4 NCE-S NCERT Social Science: Resource and development, Textbook in geography for class VIII
T 420 NCE-H NCERT Honey dew: Textbook in English for class VIII
T 420 NCE-H NCERT Honey dew: Textbook in English for class VIII
T 420 NCE-H NCERT Honey dew: Textbook in English for class VIII
T 420 NCE-H NCERT Honey dew: Textbook in English for class VIII
T 420 NCE-H NCERT Honey dew: Textbook in English for class VIII
T 930 NCE-O NCERT Our Pasts- III:Part I. Social Science textbook in History for Class VIII
T 930 NCE-O NCERT Our Pasts- III:Part I. Social Science textbook in History for Class VIII
T 930 NCE-O NCERT Our Pasts- III:Part I. Social Science textbook in History for Class VIII
T 930 NCE-O NCERT Our Pasts- III:Part I. Social Science textbook in History for Class VIII
T 930 NCE-O NCERT Our Pasts- III:Part I. Social Science textbook in History for Class VIII
T 4H0.7 NCE-V NCERT Vasanth, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 4H0.7 NCE-V NCERT Vasanth, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 4H0.7 NCE-V NCERT Vasanth, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 4H0.7 NCE-V NCERT Vasanth, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
T 4H0.7 NCE-V NCERT Vasanth, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)
R 030 YEA-08 Mathew, K M, Ed. Manorama yearbook-2007
001 VIJ-C Vijayakanth, V Current quiz: Book of trivia
028.9 BON-M Bond, Ruskin My book of favourite books
823 BUC-G Buck, Pearl S Good earth
823 LOB-H Lobdell, scott and Hernandez, Lea Hardy boys: The ocean of Osyria
823 NAR-W Narayan, R K World of Nagaraj
823 KEE-N Keene, Carolyn Nancy Drew: Global warning
923.154 FAR-A Faruque Qureshi Abdul Kalam: India’s scientist president
925.1 BEL-M Bell, E T Men of mathematics
823 ABD-W Abdulla, V ; Asher, R E , Ed. Wind flowers: Contemporary malayalam short fiction
741.5 PAW-G Paws Inc. Garfield: Get a grip
823 SUD-M Sudha Murthy Mahasweta
823 SUN-P2 Sunil Gangopadhyay Pratidwandi
158.1 CAR-P Carnegie, Dale Public speaking for success
823 CAN-C Canfield, Jack, et al. Chicken soup for the Indian soul: 101 stories to open the heart and rekindle the spirit
923.654 ARU-U2 Arun and Sunanda Gandhi Untold story of Kasturba, wife of Mahatma Gandhi
808.068 KUZ-T Kuzhali Manickavel Tucket the bucket
808.068 AMI-T Amit Garg Turtle’s flute
808.068 BOO-E BookBox Elvves and the shoemaker
808.068 URM-S Urmila Ellappan Symbiosis
808.068 LAV-S Lavina Tien Santa’s christmas
808.068 DEE-W Deepa Gangwani; Tina Suchanek whispering palms
808.068 BOO-F BookBox First well
808.068 AMI-R Amit Garg Rosa goes to the city
808.068 BOO-F Book box Four friends
808.068 KUZ-B Kuzhali Manickavel Boo in the shoe
823 COE-B Coelho, Paulo Brida
925 ABD-W Abdul Kalam, A P J; Arun Tiwari Wings of fire: An autobiography
925 ABD-W Abdul Kalam, A P J; Arun Tiwari Wings of fire: An autobiography
R 080 PET-Q Peter, Laurence J Quotations for our time
823.01 DEV-S Devika Rangachari Stories from Rajatarangini: Tales of Kashmir
598 SAL-I Salim Ali Illustrated Salim Ali: The fall of a Sparow
823.01 RUB-I Rubin, David, Tr. Illustrated Premchand: Selected short stories
808.068 TIN-M Tiny Tot My first table book
808.068 GEE-S Geeta Menon, Ed. School days: A collection of 16 stories
808.068 LUI-L Luiza Chandy Little Mermaid
808.068 APA-S Aparna Nambiar Surprise gift and Diya’s baby sister
808.068 JOS-S Joseph, Jeena Ann Spendthrift king
808.068 JOS-W Joseph, Jeena Ann Who is the killer?
808.068 ANI-G Anita Nair Ghost in the forest
808.068 SEE-E Seetha D Elves and the shoemaker
808.068 SEE-H Seena Subran Haunted kitchen and the sunken treasure
808.068 SIN-H Singh, Arthy Muthanna Haunted kitchen and the sunken treasure
808.068 APA-D Aparna Nambiar Diya’s new friend and everyone is a winner
808.068 ANI-H Anita Nair Half thief and the three-quarters thief
808.068 LUI-C Luiza Chandy Cinderella
808.068 LUI-S Luiza Chandy Snow white
808.068 MIN-S Mini John Snow queen
808.068 LIT-E Litta Jacob Emperor’s new clothes
808.068 LUI-L Luiza Chandy Little red riding hood
808.068 LUI-P Luiza Chandy Princess and the Pea
808.068 JOS-N Joseph, Jeena Ann Noblest mind
808.068 SEE-M Seena Subran Mr. Blackie’s new home and the mischievous mouse
808.068 ANI-J Anita Nair Jackal and the cat
808.068 ANI-A Anita Nair Appu, the foolish boy
808.068 TAN-S Tanya Munshi Swineherd
808.068 APA-D Aparna Nambiar Diya gets angry and the race
808.068 NAV-T Navkala Roy Telephone: How it works
808.068 MAN-B Manikya Veena Banjara Boys
808.068 MIN-M Minnie P Swami My wall
808.068 AKH-F Akhila Girirajkumar Feet problems
808.068 DEE-W Deepa Agarwal Walking tree
808.068 PRA-B Pratibha Nath Barber at the zoo
808.068 SUR-C Surekha Panandiker Chitku
808.068 SHA-P Sharmila Kanta Present for papa
808.068 NAV-S Navkala Roy Ship: How it works
808.068 ASH-R Asha Nehemiah Rajah’s Moustache
808.068 SWA-M Swati Bhattacharjee Monkeys come to village
808.068 LAL-M Lalita Bawa Monkey and the pencil
808.068 VID-M Vidya Pradhan Milkman’s cow
808.068 BAL-C Balchand; Jaya Pai Collecting stamps
808.068 ASH-M Asha Nehemiah Mrs. Woolly’s funny sweaters
808.068 KAL-M Kalyani Rajan My fish and I
808.068 FAT-C Fatima Captain Lewis
808.068 SIG-A Sigrun Srivastava All fool’s day
808.068 SHA-G Shankar Golden deer
808.068 SCH-N Scharada Bail Necessary journey
808.068 NAV-A Navkala Roy ABC
808.068 SAN-K Sangeeta Gupta; Vinita Krishna Kachru Rabbit
808.068 SRI-Z Srinivasan, Harini Gopalaswami Zoo duck
808.068 MUR-I Murthi, R K In the world of smells
808.068 BEN-O Benita Sen Oly and Owly
808.068 MAM-C Mamata Pandya Catch me if you can
808.068 SHA-A Sharmila Kantha Animal fair
808.068 KID-A Kidd, Margaret Ashok’s kite
808.068 NAV-A Navkala Roy Aeroplane: How it works
808.068 GEE-F Geeta Menon, Ed. 15 Sports stories
808.068 HAL-C Hallen, Rakesh Mohan Computer: How it works
808.068 TAR-S Tarun Cherian Sun’s handkerchief
808.068 LIS-G Lisa Gammel Gujjars
808.068 SUK-R Sukumar Shankar Ribbon
808.068 ASH-W Asha Nehemiah Wedding clothes
808.068 MAM-H Mamata Pandya Hairy tale
808.068 GHO-L Ghosh, A K Legends from Indian history
808.068 MUK-R Mukta Munjal Rainbow slide
808.068 SHA-W Shankar Woman and the crow
808.068 HEM-M Hemalata Mahagiri
808.068 NEE-Q Neeti Kaushik; Anamika Dutta Quick, smart grammar: Articles and determiners
808.068 RAV-E Ravina Gandhi Eena’s library book
808.068 NAV-R Navkala Roy Railway train: How it works
500 SUR-S Surendra Suman Science on the march
181.45 MEE-S Meenakshi Swamy Science of yoga
808.068 ASH-R Asha Nehemiah Runaway wheel
808.068 SIG-M Sigrun Srivastava My garden
808.068 SHI-K Shivkumar, K Krishna and Sudama
808.068 MAN-F Manoj Das Fourth friend
808.068 CHA-N Chalapathi Rau, M Nehru for children
808.068 DEE-T Deepa Agarwal Toy horse
808.068 ASH-G Asha Nehemiah Granny’s sari
R 001 LIM.08 Vijaya Ghose, Ed. Limca book of records 2008
808.068 ALA-T Alaka Shankar Time to rhyme
808.068 BEA Beauty and the beast
808.068 BPI-L BPI Little Red Riding Hood
808.068 YOU-A Young Learner Alice in wonderland
808.068 USH-D Usha Bansal Deal
808.068 TAP-L Tapasi De, Comp.; Lata Aggarwal, Ed. Little heroes Luv Kush
808.068 TAP-G Tapasi De, Comp.; Lata Aggarwal, Ed. Little heroes Ganesha
808.068 MON-F Mona Gupta Fabulous Sheikh Chilli
808.068 VID-J Vidya Devi Folk tales from Japan
808.068 VID-I Vidya Devi Folk tales from India
808.068 VID-N Vidya Devi Folk tales from Norway
808.068 VID-C Vidya Devi Folk tales from China
808.068 CAR Carrey the Prankster
808.068 TIM Time flies
821 ABD-L Abdul Kalam, A P J Life tree: Poems
808.068 LOV-R Loveleen Kacker Race to win
808.068 DEV-W Devika Rangachari When Amma went away
808.068 DEV-G Devika Rangachari Growing up
808.068 CHE-C Cheryl Rao Camp adventure
827 SUL-I Sulekha.com India smiles: Winning entries from the Sulekha humour contest
823 ABD-N Nair, P M Kalam effect: My years with the President
823 DAN-K Daniels, Lucy Kittens in the kitchen
608 SHA-D Sharma, G S Dictionary of inventors and inventions
823 CHE-T Chetan Bhagat 3 mistakes of my life: A story about business, cricket and religion
823 CHE-O Chetan Bhagat One night @ the call center
823 CHE-F Chetan Bhagat Five point someone what not to do at IIT
823.01 ANK-T Ankur Mitra 30 teenage stories
823 ARC-P.1 Archer, Jeffrey Prison diary, Vol.1: Belmarsh: Hell
823 ARC-P.2 Archer, Jeffrey Prison diary, Vol.2: Wayland: Purgatory
808.068 SNO Snow white
823 BRO-D Brown, Dan Da Vinci Code: A novel
823 KAZ-L Kazantzakis, Nikos Last temptation
823 ARC-P.3 Archer, Jeffrey Prison diary, Vol.3: North Sea Camp: Heaven
823 ENR-G Enright Anne Gathering
823 PUZ-O Puzo, Mario Omerta
R 294.5 NAN-B Nanditha Krishna Book of demons: Including a dictionary of demons in Sanskrit literature
925.3 HAW-W White, Michael; Gribbin, John Stephen Hawking: A life in science
928.2 MAR-L Marquez, Gabriel Garcia; Grossman, Edith, Tr. Living to tell the tale
823 ANI-L Anita Nair Ladies coupe: A novel in parts
371 WAT-O Watkin, Neal; Ahrenfelt, Johannes 100 ideas for Essential Teaching Skills
823 ROH-T Rohini Chowdhury Three princes of Persia: Children in world myth
823 COE-Z Coelho, Paulo; Costa, Margaret Jull, Tr. Zahir
823 HOS-K Hosseini, Khaled Kite runner
823 COE-F Coelho, Paulo; Landers, Clifford E, Tr. Fifth mountain
823 COE-P Coelho, Paulo; Clarke, Alan, Tr. Pilgrimage: A contemporary quest for ancient wisdom
371 PAR-O Parry, Michael 100 ideas for Supply Teachers: Primary school edition
915.479 SUK-M Suketu Mehta Maximum city: Bombay lost and found
823 VAN-Y Vandana Singh Young uncle in the Himalayas
421.52 YAR-E Yardi, V V English conversation for Indian students
928.B RAB-S Sameer Chatterji Rabindranath Tagore: The humanist extraordinaire
923.554 SHI-S Sanjay Solkar Chhatrapati Shivaji: The valiant architect of the Maratha Empire
923.144 NAP-V Vijay Goel Napoleon: The little general
823 STI-W Stine, R L Nightmare Thrillogy, Vol.2: What scares you the most?
823 STI-L Stine, R L Nightmare room: Locker 13
823 STI-D Stine, R L Nightmare room: Dear Diary, I’m dead
823 STI-F Stine, R L Nightmare Thrillogy, Vol.1: Fear games
823 STI-S Stine, R L Nightmare room: Shadow girl
823 STI-D Stine, R L

Nightmare room: Don’t forget me

823 BLY-S Blyton, Enid Secret seven: The Secret Seven, Secret Seven Adventure, Well Done, Secret Seven
823 BLY-F Blyton, Enid Famous five: Five go off to camp, Five get into trouble, Five fall into adventure
823 BLY-F Blyton, Enid Famous five: Five go to mystery Moor, Five have plenty of fun, Five on a secret trail
823 CRI-J Crichton, Michael Jurassic Park
649 NEE-D Needlman, Robert DR Spock’s baby basics
823.01 WHI-R Whitaker, Zai, Ed. Rumbling island: True stories from the forests of India
926.291 SUN-R Rachana Bhola ‘Yamini’; Sanjay Bhola ‘Dheer’ Loudatory attempt in space Sunita Williams
823 KER-F Kertesz, Imre; Wilkinson, Tim, Tr. Fateless
821 GIB-P Gibran, Khalil Prophet
925.3 HAW-F Ferguson, Kitty Stephen Hawking: Quest for a theory of everything
796.358 PAR-I Partab Ramchand India’s captains: From Nayudu to Ganguly
923.2 CHE-L Lynch, Ernesto Guevara Young Che: Memories of Che Guevara
823.01 CAN-C.3 Canfield, Jack, et al. Chicken soup for the teenage soul, Vol.3: More stories of life, love and learning
823 MOR-B Morrison, Toni Beloved: A novel
823 BON-R Bond, Ruskin Rusty goes to London
823 ANI-M Anita Nair Mistress
371.3 TRA-S Tracy, Eileen Student’s guide to exam success
828 ARU-S Arundhati Roy Shape of the beast: Conversations with Arundhati Roy
823 PAM-I Pamuk, Orphan Istanbul: Memories and the city
823 GUE-M Guevara, Ernesto Che Motorcycle diaries: Notes on a Latin American journey
823 DEE-Y Deeptha Khanna Year I turned 16
925 EIN-S Shyam Dua Luminous life of Albert Einstein
741.5 PAW-G Paws Inc. Garfield: Eat, Sleep, Eat, Sleep, Eat, Sleep, Works for me
928.B RAB-S Shyam Dua Luminous life of Rabindranath Tagore
923.154 ABD-S Shyam Dua Luminous life of A P J Abdul Kalam
741.5 PAW-G Paws Inc. Garfield: Never trust a smiling cat
923.6 TER-S Shyam Dua Luminous life of Mother Teresa
823 KAF-M Kafka, Franz Metamorphosis
923.554 TIP-S Shyam Dua Luminous life of Tipu Sultan
371 ELK-O Elkin, Susan 100 ideas for Secondary School Assemblies
371 HAY-O Haynes, Anthony 100 ideas for Teaching writing

Filed under: New Book Alert

Safety Online

The Child Safe Internet; safety online for children

By Phil Bradley

Top tips

  • Be positive about the Internet – it’s a marvellous place for children to go, to make friends, do their homework and to learn about the environment around them. Don’t make them scared of using the Internet.
  • Everyone that you meet online is a stranger, despite what they may say.
  • Encourage the child to use a nickname when they log on; make this into a fun game. However, try not to choose names that someone could pick up on and use to start a conversation, such as ‘Liverpool fan’ or ‘cat lover’.
  • Don’t arrange to meet anyone online without having checked in advance and making sure that a responsible adult is with the child.
  • If in a chat room, encourage the child to stay public, and not to go into a private room, or engage in one-on-one messaging.
  • Don’t open unsolicited emails; they may contain viruses, or links to pornographic sites. Don’t blame your child if he or she receives these.
  • Encourage children to ask an adult if they have any concerns about using the Internet.
  • Use child friendly sites.

The major areas of concern

Chat rooms

“Areas on web sites that support “live” or real time communication over the Internet. Unlike e-mail with each person sending mail and waiting for a reply, chatting involves two or more people typing comments back and forth in a conversational style. As one person enters text it appears on the other person’s screen in real time.” These may be monitored rooms or not. They enable children to make friends with others, swop files (such as music files) or play interactive games online with others. Children will see these as a fun way to extend their social lives, without possibly recognising the dangers inherent. Anyone can pretend to be anyone online – there are NO checks on this. “No-one knows that you’re a dog”
People may pose as children or teenagers, strike up a friendship and try and meet a child in an unsafe environment. Even if the adult is honest about their age, this does not imply that their intentions are good. In the UK Section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 makes it an offence for a person to meet or travel to meet a child with the intention of committing a sex offence, if he has communicated with that child on at least two previous occasions. This is often known as ‘grooming’.

Encourage your children to chat sensibly in a chat room, and try and ensure that they do not give away personal details. These would include where they go to school, where they live, their email addresses, names of other family members and so on. If someone obtains this information, it would be very easy for them to log back into the chatroom at another time under another name, and strike up a friendship ‘because we’ve got so much in common’. Particularly ensure that they don’t give out photographs of themselves to strangers, and just because they have received a photograph first, this does not mean that it is a photograph of the person that they are talking to.

Never reveal any personal details that would enable someone to contact the child outside of the chat room.
Keep online friends online; only meet if the child is with a responsible adult. This is basic safety advice that should apply to everyone, whatever their age.

There are several child friendly chat rooms that you can direct a child towards, such as Chatters, Kidchatters, Gridclub A good site with further information can be found at http://www.chatdanger.com/

Other methods of contact

Most computers (or at least those that run Microsoft software) will have an Instant Messaging service, which is very similar to mobile phone texting. It works like a chat room, where you swop messages back and forth, can share files, allow someone to have access to your system, or start a webcam chat. These can be a marvellous way of showing the grandparents the new baby, but they also have other uses, and children should be supervised if they use the service. The same rules for chatrooms apply here as well.

Searching for information on the Internet

Most search engines have an ‘adult’ filter that will attempt to filter out adult or pornographic images, but these cannot be relied upon to work. Rather than use a search engine which is designed for adult use, instead use a search engine that is designed for children. Another good listing of appropriate search engines can be found from the Searchenginewatch site, and here is another list of student friendly search engines. You might also find the Killer Info Kids search engine to be of interest. A final excellent listing is Kids Search Engines from Fagan Finder.

Be aware that some websites are specifically designed to provide children with incorrect or false information, particularly if they are looking for sites to do their homework. An example of this is the ‘Martin Luther King Jr: A true historical examination’ website at http://www.martinlutherkingdotorg/ (Please be aware that this is an unpleasant site, so be careful if you decide to visit it).

Blocking unsuitable material

As well as using a child friendly search engine, it is also sensible to install filtering or blocking software. It is however possible to by-pass these software packages, so they should not be relied upon 100%. The packages can control content, control contacts, shopping, privacy, time management, security and can monitor and record activity. The Parents Internet Network provides a list of packages which should be considered. Each package has been assessed for a variety of different factors and provides an unbiased opinion on their use and value. These products can be set to work at different levels for different users of the system, so while they are not difficult to install, some basic understanding of how the computer works, and how to set up different users on a single computers is necessary in order for the software to work correctly. Most of these packages are commercial in nature.

Check the authority of a website

  • Check to see when it was last updated.
  • Check to see if authorship details are available
  • Check the URL to see if it is a .gov (government), .edu or .ac (academic) website
  • Check the links to the website by going to a search engine such as Google and typing link:www.mysite.com to see who is linking to a site.
  • Check to see who the site is owned by. A service such as Easyspace has a nice utility that does this.
  • Check to see what the site used to look like by using the Wayback machine.

Useful websites

The Parents Information Network.
GetNetWise
Department of Education and Skills (UK)
Childnet International
For Kids by Kids Online
National Children’s Charity
Internet Watch Foundation
Childline
ThinkUKnow (This has a useful guide that can be downloaded as a .pdf or viewed in HTML)
Common sense media Reviews of films and games and an indication of their suitability for children.
EU plans for a safer internet for children. BBC news item.
Controlling Access to Internet Content What the Australians are doing in this area.
The use of filter systems A .pdf document covering the role of filtering. Produced by the University of British Columbia.
Commission on Online Child Protection (COPA) Links to various research papers in this area.
Information Society website A wide variety of links to material covering this subject area.
Kids on the web A good article that provides an overall view of the problem, with various solutions.
Acceptable Use Policies Links to various web pages that discuss acceptable use policies.
Children’s Internet Protection Act (US) Lots of useful links and information.
About Family Information Good overviews, with useful links.
Google search: “controlling access to the internet” children Click on the link to run the search.
Google search “internet filtering software” Click on the link to run the search.

Computers in Schools

Computers in schools: by type of school, 1997/98 and 1998/99: Social Trends 30
Access to the Internet: by type of school, 1998-2000
More detailed topics for Information technology in schools
Growth in internet connection and use in British secondary schools 1997-9
Information and Communications Technology in Schools in England: 2003
Children get impatient on the net – BBC new article
Using PDAs in schools

Some examples of initiatives schools are taking on the internet

Search facilities for existing websites
Guest books
Chat rooms (currently being upgraded)
School webrings
Web polls
Calendars
Book reviews
Quizzes
Crosswords
News feeds and examples from Wolverhampton Grammer school are here.


This article is © Phil Bradley 2004 and was last updated 27th March 2004

For more Internet tips and search help, visit Phil Bradley

Filed under: How to evaluate a website?

Class Library in-charges 2008-’09

Shift-I

IA  MRS. SOMANA BAIE N

IB   MRS. G.S RANJINI
IC   MRS. BINDU LAL
ID   MRS. MANJU NAIR

IIA   MRS. VIJAYA KUMARI
IIB   MRS. SREEJA PRASAD
IIC   MRS. SUDHA DEVI
IID   MRS. BEENA CHANDRASHEKAR

IIIA   MRS. SUKUMARI PILLAI
IIIB    MRS. JAYASREE V
IIIC   SEEMA NAIR (TEM)
IIID   MRS. SREELATHA

IVA   MRS. SREEJA KUMAR
IVB   MRS. SUSHMITHA
IVC   MRS. LATHIKA NAIR
IVD   MRS. SAROJAM R PILLAI

VA   MRS. V M YAMUNA
VB    MRS. GEETHA BOSE
VC   MRS. JALAJA KUMARI
VD   MRS. RAECHEL THOMAS

VI A  MRS ANILA MATHEWS
VI B   MRS. ANILA MATHEWS
VI C   MRS. ANILA MATHEWS
VI D   MRS. ANILA MATHEWS

Shift-II

I A     RANJINI B NAIR
1 B    C MANJULABHASHINI
II A    ELEZABETH JOSE
II B    SREEJA S. R
III A  INDU K.S
III B   RACHEL MATHAI
IV A  UMA DEVI
IV B   PADMA NAIR
V A    JAYANTHI M DAS
V B    MALATHI SAJIKUMAR

Filed under: Class Libraries

Syllabi for elementary and secondary classes

syllabus-for-elementary-classes1

syllabus-for-secondary-classes

Filed under: Downloads, , , ,

Report on Library Automation @ KV Pattom

Automating a school library is the process which restructures its functions and reinvents its services. By keeping a database as the basis, automation converge new technologies of information storage and retrieval with traditional housekeeping operations. An automated school library can serve the teaching and learning community more effectively. A reduction in the time needed for routine operations can be utilized to give customized services to the users. The process of library automation has a short history in our country. It needs proper planning and active implementation. Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom initiated the automation of its library to cope with the ever changing needs of the students and staff. The modernization of the library media centre helps the students to become skilled information users and life long learners.

 

Read the full report (.pdf)

Report.library-automation.pdf

Filed under: Library Automation, ,

Harry Potter’s Birth Day (July 31)

If Harry Potter could collect birthday cards from fans, on July 31 he’d be flooded with mail at the Dursley House once again. That day marks his birthday, which many readers of the Harry Potter series will celebrate at homes and bookstores in Harry’s native Great Britain and abroad.
*****************************************************************************************************************
The Library celebrates the Great Birthday  with
  • Reading Harry Potter  (Reading only from the Harry Potter through out the day and the best reader will get the prize
  • Harry Potter Book Exhbition
  • Competition on designing a book jacket for the next Harry Potter book (with an imaginary title)
  • Assembly programmes
  • And more

Visit library for more details and registration

 

Filed under: Exhibitions,Displays, ,

Membership

Be a member of Reader’s Club

Who can?

Any students studying from class VI-XII

The Committee

  • The Principal as the Patron- 01
  • Secretary
  • President
  • Two members from each class(VI-XII)- 14
  • Two teacher members- 02
  • Librarian as the convenor- 01

Reports

  • Monthly report on the website and quarterly report on the Newsletter

Filed under: Reader's Club,

Careers in Accountancy and Law

Careers after Plus Two

Cost accountancy

 

In the highly competitive scenario in manufacturing industries, efficiency is the keyword. To attain efficiency, there has to be a multi-pronged approach, an important element of which is harnessing of wealth-generating resources and waging a war against waste. The primary objective is cost reduction.

A significant role in this effort is played by the cost accountant. The services of competent cost accountants are required for analysing each one of the different items that add up to the cost of a product and for identifying ways and means of bringing down expenses.

The realm of the cost accountant spreads to regions beyond costing and maintaining accounts in industrial or business organisations. Owing to his role in the overall management and financial regimen of an industry, he is sometimes referred to as cost and management accountant. The success or failure of business decisions depends to a large extent on the quality of the information made available to the management. This emphasises the value of right cost prescription from the cost and management accountant.

On the strength of professional experience, cost accountants can reach the topmost rungs of the corporate hierarchy. They have opportunities in the public as well as private sectors.

Experienced cost accountants can opt for private practice.

The Institute of Cost and Works Accountants of India ( www.myicwai.com) regulates the profession and imparts training to students in the distance mode.

The structure of the training programme comprises three levels – Foundation, Intermediate and Final. The subjects of study are as follows.

Foundation

 

Organisation and management fundamentals; accounting; economics and business fundamentals; and business mathematics and statistics

Intermediate

 

Financial accounting; commercial and industrial laws and auditing; applied direct taxes; cost and management accounting; operation management and information systems; and applied indirect taxes

Final

 

Capital market analysis and corporate laws; financial management and international finance;

management accounting – strategic management; indirect and direct – tax Management; management accounting – enterprise performance management; advanced financial accounting and reporting; cost audit and operational audit; and business valuation management.

Candidates can join the Foundation course after passing the higher secondary examination. Those who are waiting for Plus Two results will be permitted to register provisionally.

The next step after the Foundation is the Intermediate. Admission to the Intermediate examination will be granted after obtaining the Coaching Completion Certificate. For this certificate, the students should complete the following items of training.

•Group discussion

The students are required to appear in group discussion in each stage. The topics would be as per the choice of the students but within the curriculum of that particular stage.

•Business communication seminars – two

•Hands-on computer training – 50 hours

Those who possess recognised computer qualifications would be exempted from this part.

After passing the Intermediate examination, the candidates reach the Final. Appearance in the Final examination is permitted only after obtaining the necessary coaching completion certificate. For this certificate, the students should complete the following items of training.

•Dissertation

Of 5,000 words, under the guidance of a person with the stipulated qualification

•Hands-on computer training – 100 hours

Those who possess recognised computer qualifications would be exempted from this part.

•Modular training for 15 working days, arranged by the institute

•Audit or industrial training for 12 Months

Law

 

The very foundation of our democratic system is the rule of law. The function of defining and maintaining the rights and responsibilities of individuals and institutions, with fairness and justice falls in the domain of law. There are numerous avenues for those who are qualified in law. They can work as lawyers, solicitors, judges, notaries, legal officers in government, legal advisers, legal editors, and commissioned officers in the Judge Advocate General’s Department of the army.

The legal profession has specialists who deal with specific laws – civil, criminal, taxation, company, constitutional, labour and so on.

LLB, the first degree, can be acquired after Plus Two by undergoing a five-year course in a law college. Graduates in any discipline can however finish the LLB programme in three years. After LLB, one can go for LLM in subjects such as international law, constitutional law, mercantile law, criminal law, administrative law, business law, and human rights law.

In order to ensure excellence in legal education, a few States have set up Law Universities in places such as Bangalore, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Jodhpur, Bhopal, Gandhinagar, Raipur, Chennai, Patna, Lucknow, Patiala, and Kochi. Some of these universities select candidates for the first degree based on the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT). Some of these universities conduct not only the 5-year BA, LLB(Honours) and 2-year LLM programmes, but M.Phil., Ph.D., and LLD programmes.

Despite the diverse merits of the legal profession, one disadvantage commonly pointed out is that there is a long gestation period for the evolution of a lawyer who can practise independently. But those who work with persistence and dedication do scale great heights.

The legal fraternity has a vital role to play in ensuring equity and fairness in society. It is a matter of pride and prestige to be part of the legal system.

Guidanceplus archives: http:/ www.hindu.com/

thehindu/nic/0051

Filed under: Career Corner, , , ,

The 3 Mistakes of my life

The 3 mistakes of my life, Chetan Bhagat, Rupa and Co., Rs. 95

Reviewed by Pankaj Sreenivasan (The hindu Literary Review)

Five Point Someone was as enjoyable as One Night at the Call Centre was not. Then came The 3 Mistakes of My Life. I was willing to cut Bhagat some slack only because my son loved Five Point… May be it had to do something with his aspiring to go to IIT. Still, anyone who could hold the interest of a teenager not normally given to reading fiction must have something going for him.

And, The 3 Mistakes has enough about cricket, and math tuitions, to hold a youngster’s interest. Of course, saying “Chetan Bhagat brings out the ethos and isolation of an entire generation to the fore” (the synopsis of the book says so) is doing it rather brown. One gets the same feeling reading the Acknowledgements where Bhagat addresses his readers with lines like, “My life belongs to you now, and serving you is the most meaningful thing I can do with my life….I don’t want to be India’s most admired writer. I just want to be India’s most loved writer. Admiration passes, love endures,” and so on. That was a bit uncomfortable.

Ups and downs

 

For the rest, the book is readable. Three friends in Ahmedabad decide to start a sports shop they call the Team India Cricket Shop. A priest’s son, Omi, a National Defence Academy deserter and cricket champ of his school, Ishaan, and the narrator of the story, the aspiring businessman, Govind. They are fairly successful in their business venture and their dreams and ambitions get bigger as they plan to move shop to an upmarket mall. Then, the Gujarat earthquake happens and the mall comes crashing down, dreams and all. But, life looks up again, with some romance between Govind and Vidya, (Ishaan’s sister), the hopes of launching 12-year-old Ali, a reluctant but incredibly gifted batsman as a possible team-India candidate, and a trip to Goa and then to Australia and the Australian Sports Academy.

In between all this, Godhra raises its ugly head. And, with it, the insidious relationship between religion, politics and communalism that has a deep impact on the lives of the three friends, with tragic consequences.

Clearly, the best bits of the book are those related to cricket. Such as the India Vs. Australia test match at Kolkata. The despair, slight hope, incredulity and exultation are infectious and familiar territory. Also, since I like happy endings, that is another brownie point. And, if you want to know what the “three mistakes” referred to are, you’ll have to read the book.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Filed under: Book Reviews, ,

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Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8002 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com