Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

Where Minds meet and Ideas pop up !

Tate Kids, Sports injuries

Tate Tales is a website where you will find a selection of artworks to write stories about, and find stories other children have written.

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Sports injuries for Kids

Sports/exercise related injuries and its solutions from Medline

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Filed under: Website of the week, , ,

SMG: A biography of Sunil Manohar Gavaskar

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by

Devendra Prabhudesai

(To read the Book, Visit your Library)

On that historic tour of the West Indies in 1971, Sunil Manohar Gavaskar and G.R. Visvanath roomed together in the second half, and SMG being the `junior’ partner had to play second fiddle, doing things such as opening the door if the bell rang at an unearthly hour. GRV would ask room service to bring coffee every morning at 7, and SMG would open the door. But GRV would sleep till 8! When SMG ran out of patience and requested his senior to order coffee at 8 a.m., since that was when he consumed it, his response was: "I like cold coffee!"

This anecdote, and many more, embellish the latest tribute to Gavaskar, in a book penned by Devendra Prabhudesai.

Titled SMG, and published by Rupa, it is comprehensive, well researched, and a fitting salute to a cricketer who earned respect for Indian cricket.

This is Devendra’s third book after The Nice Guy Who Finished First (a biography of Rahul Dravid) and Cricket World Cup (an account of 70 best World Cup matches). Devendra, Manager, Media Relations and Corporate Affairs, BCCI, started work on SMG in April 2006. "You cannot push yourself while working on a book like this. It is a happy coincidence that Gavaskar will be turning 60 later this year. There is no better time than this to remember the individual who initiated the team’s climb to the peak all those years ago."

But why Gavaskar? "He was my childhood hero, and I also had the opportunity to work with him. I felt that it would be good if a comprehensive tribute was paid to the man who made Indian cricket believe in itself, and proved that Indian cricketers could be as good, if not better, than others, consistently."

On the toughest part? "Describing Gavaskar’s best innings was as challenging as it was enjoyable. It was a conscious decision to begin the book with an account of his epic 96 against Pakistan on a Bangalore minefield in 1986-1987, his last Test innings. That knock hasn’t got even half the attention and importance that it deserves.

I have begun with that innings, and shifted to the chronological format thereafter," says Devendra, 33. "I have done my best to showcase Gavaskar in his innumerable `avatars.’ I have dwelt on all that he has done since his retirement as a cricketer in 1987 too. Life was never the same after I first read Gavaskar’s Sunny Days at the age of seven in 1983. He inspired me to not only play cricket, but also write about it. Today, my life has come a full circle!"

No wonder, Gavaskar paid the young Devendra a memorable compliment. "Devendra, there are some things you know about me which I didn’t know myself. Just goes to show how much effort you put in this compilation. Thanks very much for it shows sentiments which are truly appreciated."

The book is almost a history of Indian cricket from 1971, and it features significant happenings of the 1970s and 1980s, on and off the field. Needless to say, SMG is a must read and a worthy addition to your cricket library.

Courtesy: VIJAY LOKPALLY , The Hindu

Filed under: Book of the week,

Stephenie Meyer

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Stephenie Meyer’s life changed dramatically on June 2, 2003. The stay-at-home mother of three young sons woke up from a dream featuring seemingly real characters that she could not get out of her head.

"Though I had a million things to do, I stayed in bed, thinking about the dream. Unwillingly, I eventually got up and did the immediate necessities, and then put everything that I possibly could on the back burner and sat down at the computer to write—something I hadn’t done in so long that I wondered why I was bothering."

Meyer invented the plot during the day through swim lessons and potty training, and wrote it out late at night when the house was quiet. Three months later she finished her first novel, Twilight. With encouragement from her older sister (the only other person who knew she had written a book), Meyer submitted her manuscript to various literary agencies. Twilight was picked out of a slush pile at Writer’s House and eventually made its way to the publishing company Little, Brown where everyone fell immediately in love with the gripping, star-crossed lovers.

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(Visit your library to read all these books !!!!)

Twilight was one of 2005’s most talked about novels and within weeks of its release the book debuted at #5 on The New York Times bestseller list. Among its many accolades, Twilight was named an "ALA Top Ten Books for Young Adults," an Amazon.com "Best Book of the Decade…So Far", and a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year.

The highly-anticipated sequel, New Moon, was released in September 2006, and spent more than 25 weeks at the #1 position on The New York Times bestseller list.

In 2007, Eclipse literally landed around the world and fans made the Twilight Saga a worldwide phenomenon! With midnight parties and vampire-themed proms the enthusiasm for the series continued to grow.

On May 6, 2008, Little, Brown and Company released The Host, Meyer’s highly-anticipated novel for adults which debuted at #1 on The New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller lists. The Host still remains a staple on the bestseller lists more than a year after its debut.

On August 2, 2008, the final book in the Twilight Saga, Breaking Dawn was released at 12:01 midnight. Stephenie made another appearance on "Good Morning America" and was featured in many national media outlets, including Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, People Magazine and Variety. Stephenie headlined the Breaking Dawn Concert Series with Justin Furstenfeld (lead singer of Blue October) to celebrate the release in four major markets across the US. Breaking Dawn sold 1.3 million copies in its first 24 hours.

The Twilight movie, directed by Catherine Hardwicke and starring Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart, was released on November 21, 2008. Twilight debuted at #1 at the box office with $70 million, making it the highest grossing opening weekend for a female director.

Stephenie lives in Arizona with her husband and three sons.

Here is a list of interviews with Stephenie Meyer, and links to the text, audio, or video.

Bio courtesy:http://www.stepheniemeyer.com

Author website

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Filed under: Author of the week, , , , , ,

Yugratna’s speech to UN

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Summit on Climate Change

22 September 2009

Speech of Yugratna Srivastava

Respected UN Secretary General Mr. Ban Ki – moon,
Honourable Dignitaries and August Assembly.
I am 13 years young Yugratna from organisation Tarumitra,
meaning Friends of Trees, which is an NGO of 1600 high
schools and involved in promoting environmental awareness.
I feel privileged to represent children and youth, 3 billion of the
world’s population in this Summit on Climate Change.
I am so much concerned about climate change because I don’t
want our future generations to question us just as I am
questioning the need of more concrete action on climate change
today.

The Himalayas are melting, polar bears are dying, 2 of every 5
people don’t have access to clean drinking water, earth’s
temperature is increasing, we are losing the untapped
information and potential of plant species , Pacific’s water level
has risen,
Is this what we are going to hand over to our future generations?
Please…….no!
We received a clean and healthy planet from our ancestors and
we are gifting a damaged one to our successors? Is their any
justice in this?
Honourable Excellencies, we need to call for an action now. We
have to protect the earth not just for us but for our future
generations.

If not here then where, if not now then when and if not us then
who?
Please listen to our voices. The future needs strong vision and
leadership!
One month ago, we had a TUNZA International Children and
Youth Conference in Korea. The 800 participants and several
thousands online developed a statement requesting you as
leaders to:
1. Agree on a more fair, just and action oriented post-Kyoto
agreement adopted and implemented by all countries
Not just formulate policies but also enforce them by
translating them into actions.
1. Please stop the people who are making Mother Earth Cry.
2. Why cut the oxygen generating forests to create CO2
generating industries?
3. Include carbon and ecological footprint information in
products.
4. Adapt to a green economy and sustainable production.
5. Develop a multi-national climate facility to monitor
climate response strategies.
The high tech. society and currency deposits in bank are of no
use if we don’t have a compatible biosphere.
In the awareness, it is not just about solving an environmental
problem….but it is exclusively about changing the mindset and
attitude of people!

Educate students about the climate change by making
environmental education mandatory at all the levels of learning.
To get a sustainable Earth, we don’t need to stop the
developments. The need is quest and expansion of affordable
eco-friendly technologies available to common man like Energy
Efficient Campuses, Bio-fuels and Renewable energy sources.
I just want to ask all the world leaders two questions:-
1. Do environmental problems recognize any geographical or
political boundaries and age groups? My answer is certainly no.
This is why; we have the UN to talk each other about these
issues. I request you to please include the voices of children and
youth in all your decisions.
2. If national security and peace, and economic growth are
priorities, than why not climate change?
I know that you all are great leaders but overall we all are
humans. We all have a kind heart. I am sure that UN
negotiations at Copenhagen this year will end with
recommendations for good of humanity…and they have to.
Whatever has happened in the past is over. We just have present
and future in our hands. Let’s act in the present to secure our
future.

We have one Mother Earth: Care it and Share it.
Respected leaders, when you all make policies, please think of a
child suffering in greenhouse heat and think of the species
craving to survive.

Mahatma Gandhi said “Earth has enough to satisfy everyone’s
need but no one’s greed"
A bird can fly in air, a fish can swim in water, a leopard can run
far faster, But we the humans have been supernaturally gifted
with mind….a capability to think, change and reform ….so
come on let us all use these abilities to save our birthplace….
our home…. our mother earth!
Thank You

courtesy: http://www.un.org/wcm/webdav/site/climatechange/shared/Documents/SpeechYugratna.pdf

 

What she says about the event

It was really a great experience to attend the summit. Three billion of world’s population was counting on me. It was not only me but it was United Nations Environment Programme which I was representing. Overall, it was a wonderful experience to speak in front of more than 100 world leaders.
I was basically appealing to the world leaders to include the voices of children and youth in all their decisions before they finally act. I also asked them to agree on a more, fair, just and action-oriented post-Kyoto agreement adopted and implemented by all countries. They have to seal the deal in Copenhagen.
I asked them two questions:

  • If national security, peace and economic growth are priorities for them, then why not climate change?
  • Do environmental problems recognize any political or geographical boundaries and age groups?

I interacted with our Secretary General Mr.Ban-Ki-moon. He congratulated me and my efforts as well. Amongst noble laureates, I interacted with three excellencies:-

  • Honorable Ms.Wangari Maathai
  • Honoralbe Mr.Al Gore
  • Honorable Mr.R.K. Pachauri

Amongst the various Heads of State I met Head of State of Sweden, Japan, Costa Rica, Gambia, Denmark and Nepal.
I owe my success to United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) for giving me such a wonderful opportunity. UNEP helped me a lot with my speech as well as provided a lot of support and encouragement too.
I have been working as an active member of Tarumitra since 2006. Since then, I have been involved in promoting environmental awareness at grass root level as well as speaking at national and international conferences at the Global level.
In the coming time, I will be interacting with youth and children all across the country to encourage them to come up with several ideas for environment conservation. As well I am going to start Plant-for-the-Planet to plant 1 million trees in India.

Courtesy: www.ndtv.com

Know more about Yugratna

Yugratna is a 13+ years old girl from India. She represents Asia and the Pacific region
in TUNZA- Junior-Board.
She is studying in grade 9 at St.Fidelis College, Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh).
Yugratna also holds the rank of District child speaker champion.

ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVITIES:
She is prodigiously interested in taking steps to prevent environmental problems. One
steps in this direction was TUNZA’s International conference held last year in
Norway in which she got elected in Junior Board. She is the first Indian child to ever
get elected in the Junior Board.
The aims of her organisation of which she is a member is “Tarumitra” are:
• To spread ecological sensitivity.
• To equip its members with skills in handling local environmental problems.
• To organise campaigns for the preservation of bio-diversity.
• To promote spirituality and a world view that is earth friendly.
The main activities in which Yugratna is involved are:-
• To resist the felling of trees and forests and maintaining bio-diversity.,
• Promoting to built roadside gardens,
• Generating environmental awareness among parents during school functions
• Participating in Environmental related quizzes.
• Working at a global level to encourage POLITICIANS.
In their school, they collected funds for Bihar flood victims.
Funds for Cancer patients were also raised.
She has delivered speeches in and outside India and is on a constant crusade to create
a sustainable environment.
She uses media as an effective way for spreading environmental awareness.
She has represented Tarumitra at many conferences which includes “Caritas
International”, Tunza Conferences etc.
She launched a slogan in Nairobi which says “DEPOSIT GREEN GOLD TO
ENRICH OXY BANKS”.
At the Tunza Internetional Children Conference held last month in Korea, she gave a
rousing speech with ended with a call “If not now, then when?…..If not us then who?”

Yugratna believes that to solve any environmental problem 3 things are required:-
• Awareness…….of environmental problem
• Attitude…….. to be environment-friendly
• Determination………to create a sustainable environment
• Support………of the Politicians
But she considers that the support of the politicians is one of the most important
aspects required.
Last month, she also agreed to join Plant-For-The-Planet to plant one million trees in
India.

MESSAGE TO WORLD COMMUNITY:-
“There is an inevitable need in the society to create awareness about climate change
and the policies and actions required to tackle it. In fact, a tremendous result can be
achieved by changing choices and attitudes.”
“There are no political or geographical boundaries for
Environmental Problems. Blaming anyone for any Environmental
Problem is of no use…..”

CONTACT YUGRATNA
E-mail: yugratna@rediffmail.com

Filed under: Snippets, , , ,

Heroes of the Environment 2009

Time selected Green Heroes for 2009

From saving wild mountain rivers in China to measuring the Arctic’s icy expanse, from protecting the lush forests of Africa to conducting a feisty online debate, our green heroes are informed by this simple notion: We can all make a difference

As they searched for glimmers of hope in the wreckage of the world economy earlier this year, politicians, economists and commentators used one phrase so repeatedly it became something of a mantra for our times: In crisis, opportunity. Nowhere does that maxim apply more than to the problem of climate change. The financial crisis only crippled a global system; climate change is hurting the globe itself.

This December, world leaders will gather in Copenhagen to discuss new goals to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions that fuel global warming. With a new President in the White House, there is a chance the U.S. will finally inspire progress on climate change — and not just frustration. But nothing’s certain, and the real leap forward won’t happen until China and India both sign on to the idea that the economic growth they need and want will be worthless if their citizens are constantly fighting off natural disasters or don’t have enough water to drink or to irrigate their crops.

It’s easy to think that all the hard decisions are in the hands of our leaders alone. Not true. As the men and women in the following pages prove, we can all make a difference. Pen Hadow, leader of a daring survey across the Arctic to measure the thickness of sea ice, puts it this way: "Turning off a standby light once won’t make a difference. Do it for the rest of your life and that amounts to something. And if everybody’s doing something, then we’re moving in the right direction." We hope our environmental heroes provide both inspiration and action. Like financial pundits, most of them embrace the idea that a crisis also presents opportunity. They are heroes because they set out to discover what that opportunity might be.

Leaders & Visionaries

  1. Mohamed Nasheed
  2. Cameron Diaz
  3. Mike H. Pandey
  4. Prince Mostapha Zaher
  5. Marcio Santilli
  6. Yann Arthus-Bertrand
  7. Erick Solheim
  8. Steven Chu, Carol Browner, Ken Salazar and Lisa Jackson

Activists

  1. Joe Romm
  2. Marc Ona
  3. Marco Arana
  4. Syeda Rizwana Hasan
  5. Yuyun Ismawati
  6. Zhao Zhong
  7. Nnimmo Bassey

Scientists & Innovators

  1. Takashi Yabe
  2. Residents of Vauban
  3. Valerie Casey
  4. David Keith
  5. Bindeshwar Pathak
  6. Olga Speranskaya
  7. Pen Hadow, Martin Hartley and Ann Daniels
  8. Nathan Lorenz and Tim Bauer

Moguls & Entrepreneurs

  1. Sheri Liao
  2. Thomas Harttung
  3. Dorjee Sun
  4. Asim Buksh
  5. Kin Lui, Raymond Ho and Casson Trenor
  6. Yumi Someya
  7. Bill Weihl

 

Know more..

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Mike H. Pandey

‘Plant a tree. If each of us 6 billion inhabitants of this planet planted a tree, the green balance would tip favorably once again.’ — Mike H. Pandey

Al Gore wasn’t the first person to use a movie to help save the world. In India, efforts to protect everything from whale sharks to elephants, vultures to medicinal plants owe a debt to prolific wildlife-documentary maker Mike H. Pandey. Now 60, Pandey has waged a three-decade war to defend India’s wildlife and environment, rousing the apathetic and spurring governments, communities and individuals to act. His weapon of choice: film. By showing that the elephants who trample through villages are not "rogue" animals who should be shot, his 1994 film The Last Migration helped slow the decline in India’s elephant numbers. Migration, which aired on India’s state TV, revealed the complex fight for land and food between humans and animals, and showed elephants as victims of man’s greed for resources. The film and its sequel Vanishing Giants (2004), triggered a national debate and led the government to ban the more brutal traditional methods of elephant capture, which often result in the animal’s death.

Born to Indian parents in Kenya, Pandey’s love affair with nature started early. "I grew up right next to the Nairobi National Park, where elephants would raid my mother’s kitchen garden and lions’ calls would wake us at night," he says. After studying filmmaking in the U.S. and Britain, he settled in Delhi, founding Riverbank Studios in 1973 to make educational and environmental documentaries. This was a time when the word conservation was unknown in India, and Pandey and his colleagues toiled for years unheralded. Success finally came when The Last Migration screened at the Wildscreen Festival in Bristol, England — the biggest wildlife and environmental film festival in the world — and won a prestigious Panda award. More films and awards followed. Pandey’s most enduring success, though, is the weekly half-hour series Earth Matters, which has run on state television for 11 years, and has helped spur the emergence of grassroots conservation groups around India. "My effort has been to show what each of us can do," says Pandey. "The earth matters to all of us. Don’t just drive to work, look around you, see the birds and trees, and if there’s something going wrong, set it right." Earth Matters pushes that message into Indian homes every week. In such a fast-changing society, television is a powerful medium. "The key is education, and this is what my films aim to provide."

Courtesy: www.time.com

Visit Mike Pandey

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Filed under: Article of the Week,

Quiz Time

Questions

1. Among the WWW community, what has September 22 been observed as since 2006?

2. According to the nursery rhyme ‘Hey diddle diddle…’, which herbivore jumped over the moon?

3. Name the famous German light cruiser that has become famous for its attack on Madras (now Chennai) on this date in 1914?

4. Which is the second most abundant element in the earth’s crust after Oxygen?

5. Name the landlocked nation in Africa, with Bamako as the Capital, celebrating its Independence Day today.

6. What is the common term used for a bowl-shaped circular depression caused by the destruction of the peak of a volcano?

7. After which Italian savant is the number of particles in one mole of a substance named?

8. Apart from snakes and insects, which large animal kills more people in Africa than any other?

9. In Maharashtra, the first day of Chaitra is called the ____ ____?

10. What is one doing if a potato is being ‘pared’?

11. In which South American country would one use the currency ‘Nuevo Sol’?

Answers:

1. OneWebDay
2. The cow
3. SMS Emden
4. Silicon
5. Mali
6. Caldera
7. Amedeo Avogadro
8. The Hippo
9. ‘Gudi Padwa’
10. Cutting off the skin with a knife or sharp tool
11. Peru
12. Royal Rajasthan on Wheels
13. Himachal Pradesh
14. Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan
15. Sodium hypochlorite. Household bleach is usually a three to six per cent solution of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in water.

Courtesy: V V Ramanan, The Hindu

Filed under: Young World Quiz

Subscribe updates from Library through SMS

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SMS updates from Library @ KV Pattom

Filed under: Snippets

Cyber Quiz

Questions

1. Name the high-throughput wireless LAN standard that was finally approved by IEEE on September 11.

2. What was nicknamed ‘Cocktail’?

3. How did a site called ‘best-antivirus03.com’ make the news recently?

4. The non-profit, open-source foundation created by Microsoft with a contribution of $1 million is called…?

5. What is Motorola’s first Google Android device called?

6. Which Japanese giant has launched a new household LED light bulb that it says lasts 40 times longer than incandescent bulbs?

7. Which company has developed a high-quality raw video format initiative called CinemaDNG, where DNG stands for Digital Negative?

8. The cute four-year-old being used by Microsoft to promote its new products is called…?

9. Name the company that has tied up with Yahoo! to give the cyber-giant’s e-mail users the ability to attach up to 100MB of files to each e-mail with an ‘Attach Large Files’ application.

10. September 9, 2009 marked the 10th anniversary of which one-time popular game console made by Sega?

Answers

1. 802.11n.

2. Apple’s iTunes LP, a format for interactive album artwork.

3. It was a rogue ad that hit the NY Times web site ‘warning’ readers that their computer may be infected with a virus and redirects them to a site of its making.

4. CodePlex Foundation.

5. Motorola Cliq.

6. Panasonic.

7. Adobe.

8. Kylie.

9. Drop.io.

10. Dreamcast.

Courtesy: V V Ramanan, Business Line

Filed under: YW-Cyber Quiz

Heart disease at 30? Blame lifestyle

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(World Heart Day: September 27)

If you binge on junk food, smoke and don’t exercise, you are at risk of developing heart diseases in your thirties. According to doctors, about 46.9 million Indians between 20 and 69 will suffer from heart diseases by 2010 and half of them will be youngsters.

‘We have completely westernised our lifestyle. Fast food has become the staple diet for majority of youngsters. They take soft drinks in place of water and spend hours sitting in front of computers. Our sedentary lifestyle has made us more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases,’ N.K. Pandey, cardiologist and chairman of Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, told IANS Saturday, the eve of World Heart Day.

According to Pandey, when it comes to heart diseases, thirties is the new forties or fifties.

‘We live under so much of stress that we can get susceptible to heart diseases at a very young age. Most of the time people start smoking to beat the stress,’ said Pandey.

According to a survey by National commission on Macroeconomics and Health, over 3.5 million Indians, 50 percent of them from productive age groups, will die of heart diseases by 2015.

‘Intake of food rich in fats and carbohydrates, smoking, stress and lack of exercise are some of the factors leading to cardiovascular diseases,’ said Anil Saxena, cardiologist with Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre here.

The hospital receives heart patient as young as 25 to 30 though earlier cardiac diseases were seen in people above fifties, says Saxena.

Amar Singhal, head of cardiology at Sree Balaji Action Medical Institute, said: ‘It is not that people are unaware about causes of cardiovascular diseases but still they are not proactive in following a healthy lifestyle. It is high time we start taking care of ourselves.’

Explaining that some simple dietary and lifestyle changes could do wonders, Singhal said: ‘Make walking part of life. Not necessarily a morning walk but take a stroll every two hours in your office.

‘Follow a diet chart and most importantly stick to it. Fix a time for having meals and your diet should be assortment of all vitamins, proteins and necessary minerals,’ he said.

T.S. Kler, executive director, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, has a mantra for a healthy heart — pack lunch for office and don’t eat outside; stroll after every meal; take the stairs, not the lift.

Courtesy:-Indo-Asian New Service

Filed under: Snippets,

Quiz Time

 

Questions

1. What was the nationality of the famous composer Franz Joseph Haydn?

2. In Greek myth, who forged Zeus’s thunderbolt?

3. Name the Academy Award-winning director of “Platoon” and “Born on the Fourth of July”, both of which centred on the Vietnam War.

4. For which five-line form of comic verse is Edward Lear most remembered?

Photo : AP

Haydn : What was his nationality?

5. Abebe Bikila was the first athlete to win which event back-to-back at the Olympics?

6. How many dozen horns would four triceratops have between them?

7. If one had Hypoglycaemia, he or she would have abnormally low concentration of what in the blood?

8. Of what is Roquefort a type?

9. According to the Bible, on what day did God create man?


WALL-E : Six nominations.

10. What fruity surname did Hercule Poirot’s secretary have?

11. Which famous American pilot was called ‘The Lone Eagle’?

12. Apart from WALL-E, which other animated film has received six Academy Award nominations?

13. Name Donald Duck’s sister and mother of Huey, Dewey, and Louie.

14. Which of the vowels has the least number of tiles in Scrabble?

15. Which common foodstuff has the adjective ‘butyric’?

Answers

1. He was Austrian
2. The Cyclopes
3. Oliver Stone
4. Limerick
5. The marathon
6. One. Each has three horns
7. Sugar
8. Cheese
9. Sixth
10. Lemon
11. Charles Lindbergh
12. Beauty and the Beast
13. Dumbella Duck
14. U
15. Butter.

Courtesy: V V Ramanan, The Hindu

Filed under: Young World Quiz

E-Quiz

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Questions

1. Name the high-throughput wireless LAN standard that was finally approved by IEEE on September 11.

2. What was nicknamed ‘Cocktail’?

3. How did a site called ‘best-antivirus03.com’ make the news recently?

4. The non-profit, open-source foundation created by Microsoft with a contribution of $1 million is called…?

5. What is Motorola’s first Google Android device called?

6. Which Japanese giant has launched a new household LED light bulb that it says lasts 40 times longer than incandescent bulbs?

7. Which company has developed a high-quality raw video format initiative called CinemaDNG, where DNG stands for Digital Negative?

8. The cute four-year-old being used by Microsoft to promote its new products is called…?

9. Name the company that has tied up with Yahoo! to give the cyber-giant’s e-mail users the ability to attach up to 100MB of files to each e-mail with an ‘Attach Large Files’ application.

10. September 9, 2009 marked the 10th anniversary of which one-time popular game console made by Sega?

Answers

1. 802.11n.

2. Apple’s iTunes LP, a format for interactive album artwork.

3. It was a rogue ad that hit the NY Times web site ‘warning’ readers that their computer may be infected with a virus and redirects them to a site of its making.

4. CodePlex Foundation.

5. Motorola Cliq.

6. Panasonic.

7. Adobe.

8. Kylie.

9. Drop.io.

10. Dreamcast.

Courtesy: V.V. Ramanan , Business line

Filed under: YW-Cyber Quiz

5 Easy Steps to Stay Safe (and Private!) on Facebook

by Sarah Perez

September 16, 2009

Courtesy: http://www.readwriteweb.com/

 

When the President of the United States warns schoolchildren to watch what they say and do on Facebook, you know that we’ve got a problem…and it’s not one limited to the U.S.’s borders, either. People everywhere are mindlessly over-sharing on the world’s largest social network, without a second thought as to who’s reading their posts or what effect it could have on them further down the road. For example, did you know that 30% of today’s employers are using Facebook to vet potential employees prior to hiring? In today’s tough economy, the question of whether to post those embarrassing party pics could now cost you a paycheck in addition to a reputation. (Keep that in mind when tagging your friends’ photos, too, won’t you?)

But what can be done? It’s not like you can just quit Facebook, right? No – and you don’t have to either. You just need to take a few precautions.

Unbeknownst to most mainstream Facebook users, the social network actually offers a slew of privacy controls and security features which can help you batten down the hatches, so to speak. If used properly, you’ll never have to worry about whether you should friend the boss and your mom. You can friend anyone you want while comfortable in the knowledge that not everyone gets to see everything you post.

The problem in implementing these privacy options is that they’re just too confusing for most non-tech savvy people to handle. And often, folks don’t want to bother to take the time to learn. To simplify the process, we’re offering five easy steps you can take today to help make your Facebook experience safer, more secure, and more private.

Step 1: Make Friend Lists

Yes, it will take some time, especially if you’re connected to a couple hundred friends already. But this step, while not the quickest, is fairly simple. And it will be one of the most useful things you can do on Facebook.

Friend lists, like they sound, are lists for categorizing your friends into various groups. The nice thing about this feature is that once you set these lists up, you won’t have to do it again. We suggest that you put your work colleagues and professional acquaintances into a friend list designated "work," personal friends you’re not very close with into a list called "Acquaintances," and people you’re related to into a list called "Family." Those three main categories will separate out the groups of "friends" who you may want to hide some information from.

To create a friend list, click on "Friends" at the top of the Facebook homepage. In the left-hand column, click "Friends" again under the "Lists" section. Now you’ll see a button at the top that says "Create New List". Click it. In the pop-up that appears, you can name your list and pick members. If you’ve ever shared an application with your friends, the process of doing this will be very familiar.

When you’ve finished making lists, you’ll be able to use them when selecting who can see what (or who can’t!) when configuring the security settings described below.

Step 2: Who Can See What on Your Profile

At the top right of Facebook, there’s a menu that many people probably ignore: "Settings." But this menu is now going to become your best friend. To get started, hover your mouse over the Settings menu and click "Privacy Settings" from the list that appears. On the next page, click "Profile." This takes you to a page where you can configure who gets to see certain information on your profile.

Before making changes, think carefully about the sorts of things you want public and the things you want private. Should "everyone" get to see photos you’re tagged in? Or would you like to limit this only to those you’ve specifically chosen as Facebook friends?

Underneath each section on this page (basic info, personal info, status, etc.), you can designate who gets to see that particular bit of information. For anyone not using custom lists (see step 1), the best thing to enter here is "Only Friends." Anything else opens up your profile information to people you may or may not know. For example, choosing "Everyone" makes that info public, "Friends of Friends" lets your friends’ friends see it, "My Networks and Friends" opens up your info to anyone in your networks – that means anyone in your city, your high school, your college, a professional organization you listed, etc.

You can also block certain groups from seeing these sections, too. On any item that offers an "Edit Custom Settings" option, you can click that link to display a pop-up box where you can choose people or lists to block (see where it says "Except these people"). If you haven’t made custom lists as explained in step 1 above, you can enter individual names here instead. (Sorry, mom, dad, boss – this is where you get blocked.)

 

Step 3: Who Can See Your Address and Phone Number

Did you list your address and phone number on Facebook? While that’s a handy feature, you may not want everyone you friended to have this information. To access this configuration page, you follow the same steps as above in step 2 to display the Profile Privacy page. You’ll notice that the page has two tabs at the top – click on the one that reads "Contact information."

As previously described above, you can again use the drop-down lists provided to designate who gets to see what and/or block certain people or lists from viewing this information. The sections on this page include "IM Screen Name," "Mobile Phone," "Other Phone," "Current Address," "Website," and your email.

Step 4: Change Who Can Find You on Facebook via Search

Sick of getting friend requests from old high school pals? While for some the beauty of Facebook is that it lets you reconnect with everyone you ever knew throughout your life, others find this intrusive and annoying. You’re not friends with any of these people anymore for a reason, right?

As it turns out, you can still enjoy Facebook without some folks ever knowing or finding you thanks to the search privacy settings.

Click on the "Settings" menu on Facebook’s homepage and then click "Search" on the following page. You’ll be taken to a Search Privacy page where you can specify who gets to find you on Facebook. Want to be wide open? Change the "Search Visibility" drop-down box to "Everyone." Want to keep it a little more limited? Select "My Networks and Friends," "Friends of Friends," or "My Networks and Friends of Friends" instead. Don’t want anyone finding you on Facebook? Change it to "Only Friends." That means only the people who you’ve already friended can find you in a Facebook search.

On this page, you can also configure what information displays when your info is returned as a search result (e.g. your profile picture, your friend list, etc.). In addition, you can check and uncheck the boxes for network-based searches too. For example, if you don’t want anyone from high school to find you, uncheck the box next to "people in high school networks."

Step 5: Stop Sharing Personal Info with Unknown Applications

Remember when we told you about what Facebook quizzes know about you? Using Facebook’s default settings, you’re unknowingly sharing a plethora of personal information (and your friends’ info too!) with various Facebook applications and the developers who created them. The problem is so bad that the ACLU recently created their own Facebook Quiz to demonstrate how much information an app has access to.

It’s time to take back control! From the Facebook homepage, hover your mouse over the "Settings" menu and choose "Privacy Settings" from the drop-down list. On the next page, click "Applications" then click the tab that reads "Settings" which is next to the "Overview" tab. (Oh, and if you want to really be freaked out, read that overview!)

On this page, you can check and uncheck boxes next to your personal information (picture, education history, wall, religious views, etc.). This controls what the applications your friends are using can see about you. Yes, your friends’ apps can see your personal info if you don’t make this change! Believe it or not, you don’t have the same control over your own apps. The best you can do is head over to the Applications page and delete the apps you’re not using anymore. (Use the "X" to remove them.) You see, once you authorize an application, you’re telling it that it’s OK to access any information associated with your account that it requires to work. While some developers may only pull what’s actually required, many others just pull in everything they can. Scary, isn’t it?

Conclusion

While this is by no means a comprehensive guide to Facebook security and privacy, these five steps can help you get started in creating a safer, more secure, and more private environment on the social network.

However, if you choose not to take any precautions, then you’ll only have yourself to blame when an errant wall post or naughty photo makes its way online and straight into Grandma’s News Feed, or worse, your boss’s. These days, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so go ahead and delve into those settings!

Courtesy: http://www.readwriteweb.com/

Filed under: Online safety Tips, , , , ,

5 Easy Steps to Stay Safe (and Private!) on Facebook

by Sarah Perez

September 16, 2009

Courtesy: http://www.readwriteweb.com/

 

When the President of the United States warns schoolchildren to watch what they say and do on Facebook, you know that we’ve got a problem…and it’s not one limited to the U.S.’s borders, either. People everywhere are mindlessly over-sharing on the world’s largest social network, without a second thought as to who’s reading their posts or what effect it could have on them further down the road. For example, did you know that 30% of today’s employers are using Facebook to vet potential employees prior to hiring? In today’s tough economy, the question of whether to post those embarrassing party pics could now cost you a paycheck in addition to a reputation. (Keep that in mind when tagging your friends’ photos, too, won’t you?)

But what can be done? It’s not like you can just quit Facebook, right? No – and you don’t have to either. You just need to take a few precautions.

Unbeknownst to most mainstream Facebook users, the social network actually offers a slew of privacy controls and security features which can help you batten down the hatches, so to speak. If used properly, you’ll never have to worry about whether you should friend the boss and your mom. You can friend anyone you want while comfortable in the knowledge that not everyone gets to see everything you post.

The problem in implementing these privacy options is that they’re just too confusing for most non-tech savvy people to handle. And often, folks don’t want to bother to take the time to learn. To simplify the process, we’re offering five easy steps you can take today to help make your Facebook experience safer, more secure, and more private.

Step 1: Make Friend Lists

Yes, it will take some time, especially if you’re connected to a couple hundred friends already. But this step, while not the quickest, is fairly simple. And it will be one of the most useful things you can do on Facebook.

Friend lists, like they sound, are lists for categorizing your friends into various groups. The nice thing about this feature is that once you set these lists up, you won’t have to do it again. We suggest that you put your work colleagues and professional acquaintances into a friend list designated "work," personal friends you’re not very close with into a list called "Acquaintances," and people you’re related to into a list called "Family." Those three main categories will separate out the groups of "friends" who you may want to hide some information from.

To create a friend list, click on "Friends" at the top of the Facebook homepage. In the left-hand column, click "Friends" again under the "Lists" section. Now you’ll see a button at the top that says "Create New List". Click it. In the pop-up that appears, you can name your list and pick members. If you’ve ever shared an application with your friends, the process of doing this will be very familiar.

When you’ve finished making lists, you’ll be able to use them when selecting who can see what (or who can’t!) when configuring the security settings described below.

Step 2: Who Can See What on Your Profile

At the top right of Facebook, there’s a menu that many people probably ignore: "Settings." But this menu is now going to become your best friend. To get started, hover your mouse over the Settings menu and click "Privacy Settings" from the list that appears. On the next page, click "Profile." This takes you to a page where you can configure who gets to see certain information on your profile.

Before making changes, think carefully about the sorts of things you want public and the things you want private. Should "everyone" get to see photos you’re tagged in? Or would you like to limit this only to those you’ve specifically chosen as Facebook friends?

Underneath each section on this page (basic info, personal info, status, etc.), you can designate who gets to see that particular bit of information. For anyone not using custom lists (see step 1), the best thing to enter here is "Only Friends." Anything else opens up your profile information to people you may or may not know. For example, choosing "Everyone" makes that info public, "Friends of Friends" lets your friends’ friends see it, "My Networks and Friends" opens up your info to anyone in your networks – that means anyone in your city, your high school, your college, a professional organization you listed, etc.

You can also block certain groups from seeing these sections, too. On any item that offers an "Edit Custom Settings" option, you can click that link to display a pop-up box where you can choose people or lists to block (see where it says "Except these people"). If you haven’t made custom lists as explained in step 1 above, you can enter individual names here instead. (Sorry, mom, dad, boss – this is where you get blocked.)

 

Step 3: Who Can See Your Address and Phone Number

Did you list your address and phone number on Facebook? While that’s a handy feature, you may not want everyone you friended to have this information. To access this configuration page, you follow the same steps as above in step 2 to display the Profile Privacy page. You’ll notice that the page has two tabs at the top – click on the one that reads "Contact information."

As previously described above, you can again use the drop-down lists provided to designate who gets to see what and/or block certain people or lists from viewing this information. The sections on this page include "IM Screen Name," "Mobile Phone," "Other Phone," "Current Address," "Website," and your email.

Step 4: Change Who Can Find You on Facebook via Search

Sick of getting friend requests from old high school pals? While for some the beauty of Facebook is that it lets you reconnect with everyone you ever knew throughout your life, others find this intrusive and annoying. You’re not friends with any of these people anymore for a reason, right?

As it turns out, you can still enjoy Facebook without some folks ever knowing or finding you thanks to the search privacy settings.

Click on the "Settings" menu on Facebook’s homepage and then click "Search" on the following page. You’ll be taken to a Search Privacy page where you can specify who gets to find you on Facebook. Want to be wide open? Change the "Search Visibility" drop-down box to "Everyone." Want to keep it a little more limited? Select "My Networks and Friends," "Friends of Friends," or "My Networks and Friends of Friends" instead. Don’t want anyone finding you on Facebook? Change it to "Only Friends." That means only the people who you’ve already friended can find you in a Facebook search.

On this page, you can also configure what information displays when your info is returned as a search result (e.g. your profile picture, your friend list, etc.). In addition, you can check and uncheck the boxes for network-based searches too. For example, if you don’t want anyone from high school to find you, uncheck the box next to "people in high school networks."

Step 5: Stop Sharing Personal Info with Unknown Applications

Remember when we told you about what Facebook quizzes know about you? Using Facebook’s default settings, you’re unknowingly sharing a plethora of personal information (and your friends’ info too!) with various Facebook applications and the developers who created them. The problem is so bad that the ACLU recently created their own Facebook Quiz to demonstrate how much information an app has access to.

It’s time to take back control! From the Facebook homepage, hover your mouse over the "Settings" menu and choose "Privacy Settings" from the drop-down list. On the next page, click "Applications" then click the tab that reads "Settings" which is next to the "Overview" tab. (Oh, and if you want to really be freaked out, read that overview!)

On this page, you can check and uncheck boxes next to your personal information (picture, education history, wall, religious views, etc.). This controls what the applications your friends are using can see about you. Yes, your friends’ apps can see your personal info if you don’t make this change! Believe it or not, you don’t have the same control over your own apps. The best you can do is head over to the Applications page and delete the apps you’re not using anymore. (Use the "X" to remove them.) You see, once you authorize an application, you’re telling it that it’s OK to access any information associated with your account that it requires to work. While some developers may only pull what’s actually required, many others just pull in everything they can. Scary, isn’t it?

Conclusion

While this is by no means a comprehensive guide to Facebook security and privacy, these five steps can help you get started in creating a safer, more secure, and more private environment on the social network.

However, if you choose not to take any precautions, then you’ll only have yourself to blame when an errant wall post or naughty photo makes its way online and straight into Grandma’s News Feed, or worse, your boss’s. These days, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so go ahead and delve into those settings!

Courtesy: http://www.readwriteweb.com/

Filed under: Online safety Tips, , , , ,

The Lost Symbol

image

The Lost Symbol

by

Dan Brown

The new book from the author of “Da Vinci Code”

The book is on display in the Library from 18th Sept. to 10th Oct. 2009

Read a comment on the book appeared on the New Yorker

 

Read All About It

by

Adam Gopnik

In hard times, we look to the single savior, the knight in shining armor. Or knights: the Beatles, forty years on, have reappeared, walking across the same old London road, to rescue what’s left of the record industry. At the same moment, the publishing industry, still afloat but listing, turns to the less charismatic but crafty eye of the writer Dan Brown to sail it back to safety. Brown’s long occult-mystery novels, featuring the intrepid Dr. Robert Langdon, a tenured Harvard professor of something called symbology—a field unknown to both Harvard and spell-check (try it)—are the welcome if improbable million-and-beyond best-sellers of our time, with the latest episode, “The Lost Symbol,” now upon us. The new book is, as every speed-reading reviewer has noted, the same package as before—the wise if wooden professor, the cagey babe-scientist, the oft-naked assassin, and the ancient conspiracy newly brought to life in familiar tourist destinations, this time in Washington, D.C., rather than Paris, and turning on elusive Masonic mystics, rather than secretive Merovingian dynasts. But what, exactly, is inside the package? What spell does it cast and how does it cast it? Books are not so widely read without a reason. Surely future historians will look to Brown as an index of What We Were Really Thinking, and, turning the dense and loaded pages of his books, they may well ask, This they read for fun?

It’s easy to pastiche Brown’s prose, with its infectious italics (“What the hell is going on?!”) and its action-prodding, single-sentence paragraphs. (“Langdon stared in horror.”) The clichés line up outside the dust jacket and are whisked in pairs to a table down front: “In the heat of the moment, Capitol police officer Nuñez had seen no option but to help the Capitol Architect and Robert Langdon escape. Now, however, back in the basement police headquarters, Nuñez could see the storm clouds gathering fast.” Add Brown’s habit of inventing where no invention is needed—there are no departments of “symbology,” but there are departments of semiotics, where Langdon would fit right in—and you have a surface less commercially calculated than genuinely eccentric.

And well meaning. “The Lost Symbol”—with all its ritual murders and fearsome amputations and “My God!”s around every margin—is an amazingly nice book. The text regularly lurches to a stop, with the generosity of a third-grade teacher on a class museum outing, offering bits of research and history. Much of it is bogus, to be sure—though modern Masonry borrowed some oogah-boogah from the Egyptian past, it was an Enlightenment club, whose greatest product was “The Magic Flute,” and which was about as sinister, and secretly controlled about as many governments, as the Royal Order of Raccoons in “The Honeymooners.” But Brown is having fun. And the book is full of activities; there’s more to do with a pencil and safety scissors than in any Highlights for Children. At a crucial moment in the story, we even have a magic square, one of those puzzles, beloved of twelve-year-old boys, in which every row and column adds up to the same number. (The mysteries themselves, however, are not very mysterious: if you can’t figure out what the tall, thin, pyramid-capped, Masonic-looking monument in Washington to which this story is strangely tending might be, then you are slower on the uptake than most, though swifter than Langdon.)

The connection to the twelve-year-old boy might be the key. Brown’s writing resembles less the adult best-sellers of the past, which popularized high literary forms—“Gone with the Wind” was a kind of kitsch Tolstoy—than the adventure stories that were once the staple of adolescent literature. Tom Swift and the Hardy Boys were always in the midst of compelling conspiracies; there was always a code that had to be cracked, and ancient Asian priests and ancient Asian cults invading their cozy American worlds.

And that may be the secret of Brown’s appeal: his books are as sweet-tempered as they are secret-minded. Langdon exposes horrible conspiracies, but it turns out that, with the exception of a few homicidal hotheads, who have maybe let the thing run away with them, decent, well-intended guys run even the weirdest cabals. Brown’s repeated point is not that we are mired in ancient conspiracies but that ancient conspiracies anticipate modern opinions. What is “coded” in “The Da Vinci Code” is that the ancient Christians were modern feminists; Jesus was a loving husband who deferred to the wisdom of his wife, Mary Magdalene, the Hillary Clinton of Galilee. When we come to the end of this new book, we discover that what the Masons were really practicing was a neat kind of cognitive science. The old codes of the pyramid are merely the newest discoveries of psychology, a thought that turns the text once again toward italics: “ ‘The Bible, like many ancient texts, is a detailed exposition of the most sophisticated machine ever created. . . the human mind.’ She sighed.”

Conspiracies invoked in a mode essentially cheerful, the occult revealed to be engagingly open-minded: Brown’s secret turns out to be the same as Oprah’s beloved “Secret”—you can have it all. Ancient myth and modern science, weird conspiracies and a job at Harvard—not to mention the affection of the heroine. This is the new conspiratorial normal.

The trouble comes not only when you recall real history but when you look around: the conspiracy theories out there today—the ones about the socialist fascists who are coming to get you at the behest of the alien President—are not cute. The old ones weren’t, either. Real anti-Masonic paranoia was a bad business, intertwined with the ugliest politics in European history. Fear and hatred underlie conspiracy theories; they always have. You can draw them away from reality, but you can’t really drain them of rage. There’s maybe something worrying about so many millions of readers entertaining a paranoia on the page that was, in its time, as crazy as the paranoia in the country today. As that twelve-year-old’s mom used to say, it’s all a lot of fun until somebody cries. ♦

Courtesy: The New Yorker

Filed under: Book of the week, ,

Stop Press Sept.2009 (Special Library Bulletin)

image

Special Bulletin Stop Press September 2009

Just Arrived!

The Lost Symbol: Dan Brown

Listening to grass hoppers: Arundhati Roy

The idea of Justice : Amrtya Sen

Shadows across the playing field: Sashi Tharoor and Shaharyar Khan

Twilight, The Host, Eclipse, New Moon and Breaking Dawn : Stephenie Mayer

Other Colours : Orhan Pamuk (new copy)

SMG: A biography of Sunil Mandhar Gavaskar

On display from 18th Sept. to 12nd October 2009

Filed under: Library Bulletin, ,

Website of the week: Great Websites for Kids

image

Great Websites for Kids

image

Originally created in 1997 by the first Children and Technology Committee of the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association. Currently maintained by the ALSC Great Web Sites Committee.

This is a great collection of website which are relevant and useful for children.

The selection criteria and classification of websites make this site very attractive and useful

The websites are classified and marked as

  • Appropriate for PreK aged youth
  • Appropriate for Elementary aged youth
  • Appropriate for Middle School aged youth
  • For Parents/Teachers/Caregivers

Example

Filed under: Website of the week, ,

Career Links


Academics

• University Grants Commission – www.ugc.ac.in
• Central Board Of Secondary Education – www.cbse.nic.in
• Delhi University – www.du.ac.in
• Jawaharlal Nehru University – www.jnu.ac.in
• National Council for Teacher Education – www.ncte-in.org
• National Council for Educational Research & Training – www.ncert.nic.in
• Ministry of HRD (Education) – www.education.nic.in


Aviation

• Directorate General of Civil Aviation – www.dgca.nic.in
• IATA training – www.iata.org
• Ministry of Civil Aviation – www.civilaviation.nic.in
• Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Uran Akademi – www.igrua.gov.in


Banking

• Reserve Bank of India – www.rbi.org.in
• State Bank of India – www.statebankofindia.com
• Panjab National Bank – www.pnbindia.com
• Corporation Bank – www.corpbank.com


Civil – Services

• Union Public Service Commission – www.upsc.gov.in/
• Staff Selection Commission – ssc.nic.in
• Department of Personal & Training – www.dopt.nic.in


Defence

• National Defence Academy – www.nda.nic.in
• Indian Army – www.indianarmy.nic.in
• Join Indian Army – www.joinindianarmy.nic.in
• Indian Air Force – www.indianairforce.nic.in
• Indian Navy – www.indiannavy.nic.in


Engineering

• All India Council of Technical Education – www.aicte.ernet.in
• The Institutions of Engineers (India) – http://www.ieindia.org
• IIT-Kharagpur – www.iitkgp.ac.in
• Bureau of Energy Efficiency – www.bee.gov.in
• Distance Education Council for distance education in Engineering – www.dec.ac.in
• Joint Entrance Examination (Orissa) – www.jeeorissa.com


Finance

• The Institute Of Chartered Accountant – www.icai.org
• The Institute Of Company Secretaries of India – www.icsi.edu
• National Stock exchange of India – www.nseindia.com
• Bombay Stock exchange – www.bseindia.com
• Indian Institute of Banking & Finance – www.iibf.org.in
• Indian Institute of Statistical Institute – www.isical.ac.in


Hospitality

• Incredible India – www.incredibleindia.org
• Ministry of Tourism – www.tourisminindia.com


IT

• NASSCOM – www.nasscom.in
• Ministry of IT – www.mit.gov.in
• DOECC – www.doeacc.edu.in
• Centre For Development of Advance Computing – www.cdac.in
• Indian Institute of Technology Madras – www.iitm.ac.in


Law

• Supreme Court of India – www.supremecourtofindia.nic.in
• Ministry of Law & Justice – www.lawmin.nic.in
• National Commission for Women – www.ncw.nic.in
• Central Administrative Tribunal – www.cgat.gov.in


Library Science

• Raja Rammohun Roy Library foundation – www.rrrlf.nic.in
• National Archives Of India – www.nationalarchives.gov.in


Management

• Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta – www.iimcal.ac.in
• Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad – www.iimahd.ernet.in


Media

• Indian Institute of Mass Commission – www.iimc.nic.in
• Publications Division – www.publicationsdivision.nic.in
• DoorDarshan – www.ddindia.com
• Directorate Of Advertising and Visual Publicity – www.davp.nic.in
• Press Information Bureau – www.pib.nic.in


Medicine

• Ministry of Health & Welfare – www.mohwf.nic.in
• Department of Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH) –    www.indianmedicine.nic.in
• National Aids Control Organisation – www.nacoonline.org
• Armed Forces Medical College – www.armedforces.nic.in


Railways

• Indian Railways – www.indianrail.gov.in
• Indian Railways – www.indianrailways.gov.in
• Ministry of Railways – www.railnet.gov.in
• IRCON – www.ircon.org
• Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation Ltd. – www.irctc.co.in


Retail

• Indian Institute of Social Welfare and Business Management, Kolkata – www.iiswbm.edu
• CII Institute of Logistics, Chennai – www.ciilogistics.com
• Gobind Ballabh Pant University – www.gbpuat.ac.in
• Annamalai University – www.annauniv.edu
• Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, – www.iift.edu


Science

• Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University – www.jntu.ac.in
• IIT Bombay – www.iitb.ac.in
• Mumbai University – www.mu.ac.in
• Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad – www.ismdhanbad.ac.in
• CSIR-UGC (NET) – www.csirhrdg.res.in
• Indian Council of Medical Research, – www.icmr.nic.in
• Birla Institute of Technology, Ranchi – www.bitmesra.ac.in
• Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai – www.mkudde.org
• Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur – www.iitkgp.ernet.in
• Central Institute of Fisheries Nautical and Engineering Training – www.cifnet.nic.in
• Bioinformatics Institute of India – www.bioinformaticscentre.org


Science-IPR/PATENTS

• Patent Office, Govt of India – www.ipindia.nic.in
• Institute of Intellectual Property Studies, Mumbai – www.iips.ac.in
• National Law School of India University, Nagarbhavi – www.nls.ac.in
• Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad (Deemed University) – www.iiita.ac.in


Self Entrepreneurship

• Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Kochi – www.cmfri.com
• Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai – www.tiss.edu
• Ministry of Labour & Employment (Directorate General of Employment & Training) ADVANCED TRAINING INSTITUTE – http://dget.nic.in/atikanpur


Pharmacy

• Academy for Clinical Excellence (ACE) – www.aceindia.org
• Institute of Clinical Research (ICRI) – www.icriindia.com
• Bombay College of Pharmacy – www.bcpindia.org
• Jamia Hamdarad Islamia – www.jmi.ac.in
• National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER). S.A.S. Nagar, Punjab – www.niper.nic.in
• Guru Jambeshwar University, Hisar – www.gju.ernet.in

Courtesy: http://www.employmentnews.gov.in

______________________________________________

A Blog exclusively for Job seekers

Jobmob

JobMob is a free blog that teaches job seekers how to find better
jobs, faster. The blog is filled with straight-talking advice based on
real-world experience with lots of humor thrown in.

Filed under: Career Corner, Career Links, ,

Library Bulletin, September 2009 released

image

Read the Bulletin

Library Bulletin Sept 2009


Library Bulletin September 2009

Filed under: Library Bulletin,

New Arrivals (10/09/2009)

NEW ARRIVALS

10/09/2009

CALL NO.

AUTHOR

TITLE

001  SUJ-R

 Sujata Ray

 Rupa book of literature quiz

001.076  SAX-E26

 Saxena, Ved Prakash, et al.

 Engineering colleges entrance examination

004  SUM-I

 Sumita Arora

 Information practices: A textbook for class XI

080  RAB-Q

 Rabindranath Tagore

 Quotes from Tagore

155.25  YAG-S

 Yager, John

 Self motivation

158.1  ABU-U

 Abudu

 Use water as your medicine

158.1  BOR-I

 Borysenko, Joan Z

 Inner peace for busy people

158.1  DYE-I

 Dyer, Wayne W.

 Inspiration: Your ultimate calling

158.1  HOL-H

 Holden, Robert

 Happiness now

158.1  NEI-F

 Neill, Michael

 Feel happy now

158.1  PAV-P

 Pavlina, Steve

 Personal development for smart people

158.1  PEA-P

 Peale, Norman Vincent

 Positive Imaging

158.1  PEA-P

 Peale, Norman Vincent

 Power of the plus factor

158.1  PEA-R

 Peale, Norman Vincent

 Reaching your potential

158.1  PEA-T

 Peale, Norman Vincent

 Three sixty five ways to change the world

158.1  SCH-B

 Schuller, Robert H.

 Be an extraordinary person in an ordinary world

158.1  SCH-T

 Schuller, Robert H.

 Tough times never last, but tough people do

158.1  WEB-F

 Webb, Wyatt

 Five steps to overcoming fear and self doubt

158.1  WEI-P

 Weinberg, George

 Practical ways to a powerful personality

181.4  KRI-T

 Krishnamurti, J

 Total freedom: The seential Krishnamurti

181.48  KAS-S.1

 Kasturi, N, Ed.

 Sathyam sivam sundaram, Part2

291  RAD-I

 Radhakrishnan S

 Identity and ethos: The adaptive Indian

291  RAD-R

 Radhakrishnan S

 Religion, science and culture

294.4  LOR-T

 lord Mahavir

 Thus spake

294.5  DHA

 

 Dhaturupavali (h)

295  ZAR-T

 Zarathushtra

 Thus spake

320.09  NAI-K

 Nair, P M

 Kalam effect

333.91  BRI-O

 Briscoe, John and Malik, R P S., Ed.

 Oxford handbook of water resources in India

355.450954  GUR-I

 Gurmeet Kanwal

 Indian Army Vision 2020

363.7  CBS-E

 CBSE

 Environmental education: Class I-VIII

363.7  CBS-E

 CBSE

 Environmental education: Teachers’ manual. Class 9

363.7  SUN-E

 Sunita Jaisingh

 Environmental education for us 3

375  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Senior school curriculum, 2010, Vol.II: Languages

375  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Senior school curriculum, 2010, Vol.II: Languages

375  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Secondary school curriculum, 2010, Vol.II: Languages

375  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Secondary school curriculum, 2010, Vol.I: Main subjects

375  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Secondary school curriculum 2006 Vol. 1 Main subjects

375  CBS-S.98.1

 CBSE

 Senior school curriculum 1997, Vol.1: Main subjects

375  CBS-S.98.1

 CBSE

 Senior school curriculum 1999, Vol.1: Main subjects

420  ORI-E

 Orient longman

 English 400 reading programme ,

Box 2

420.7  PET-S

 Peterson, Jim

 Self help to english conversation

421.5  NEE-P

 Neelima M.

 Practical English pronunciation

423.1  KHU-D

 Khurana, Shashi

 Dictionary of quotations

425  AMI-G

 Amin, A ,et al

 Grammar builder

425  BHA-H

 Bhatia, M P

 Handbook of applied grammar and composition

425  JOS-A

 Joseph, C J

 A comprehensive grammar of current English

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Identify the correct spelling exercise book, Category 1 (Class I & II)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 2 (Class III & IV)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 4 (Class VII & VIII)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 3 (Class V & VI)

425  NIL-C

 Nileena M.

 Crossword excercise book

425  NIL-P

 Nileena M.

 Picture crosswords

425  TAL-G

 Talwar, M L

 Graded English grammar, 4

502.8  CBS-A

 CBSE

 Assessment of practical skills in science and technology , Class IX

502.8  CBS-A

 CBSE

 Assessment of practical skills in science and technology , Class X

502.8  CBS-L

 CBSE

 Learning by doing, Compendium of science activities, Class VI

502.8  CBS-S

 CBSE

 Science is doing: Activity book for class VII

510  MAN-M

 Manjeet Singh

 Mathematics, Class X

510.028  CBS-G

 CBSE

 Guidelines for mathematics laboratory in schools Class IX

510.028  CBS-G

 CBSE

 Guidelines for mathematics laboratory in schools: Class X

511.3  CLE-U

 Clemson, Wndy and Clemson, David

 Using maths: Be a zoo keeper

511.3  CLE-U

 Clemson, Wndy and Clemson, David

 Using maths: Dinosaur dig

511.3  SHA-B

 Shakuntala Devi

 Book of numbers

540  VER-C

 Verma, N K

 Compehensive Chemistry for Class XII

590  ARO-C

 Arora B B

 Complete guide to biology

660.6  DUB-T

 Dubey, R C

 Textbook of biotechnology

687  TIC-E

 Ticktock Media, Kent

 Everyday clothes

793.73  GOU-T

 Gould, Wayne, comp.

 Times Su Doku: The number-placing puzzle

793.73  RUS-C

 Russel, Ken and Carter, Philip

 Check you I Q

795  EMM-A

 Emmanuel, George

 Athletic Meet – marking , Niyamangal, Nirdhesangal (Malayalam)

808.068  AKH-F

 Akhila Girirajkumar

 Feet problems

808.068  ALI

 

 Alibaba and other stories

808.068  AND-F

 Anderson, Hans Christian

 Fir tree

808.068  ANI-A

 Anita Nair

 Astrologer and Kalyani the crow

808.068  ANI-A

 Anita Nair

 Appu, the foolish boy

808.068  ANI-G

 Anita Nair

 Good magician and the black magician

808.068  ANI-G

 Anita Nair

 Ghost in the forest

808.068  ANI-G

 Anita Nair

 Girl and the monkey

808.068  ANI-H

 Anita Nair

 Half-thief and the three-quarters thief

808.068  ANI-J

 Anita Nair

 Jackal and the tiger

808.068  ANI-J

 Anita Nair

 Jackal and the cat

808.068  ANI-S

 Anita Nair

 Snooty teapot and Mr. & Mrs. Robin’s nest

808.068  ANJ-M

 Anjali Banerji

 Math skills

808.068  APA-A

 Aparna Nambiar

 A surprise gift and Diya’s baby sister

808.068  APA-D

 Aparna Nambiar

 Diya gets angry and the race

808.068  APA-D

 Aparna Nambiar

 Diya’s picture & help! It’s a monster

808.068  APA-D

 Aparna Nambiar

 Diya’s New friend and everyone is a winner

808.068  APA-W

 Aparna Nambiar

 Waiting for grandma and the best gift of all

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Jamuna

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Where are my socks

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 In the tent

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Trouble with dinosaurs

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Trouble with dinosaurs

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Big game

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 At the zoo

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Time to get up

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Rocket to the moon

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 In the garden

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Down in the grass

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Mystery of the buried treasure

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Time to get up

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Jamuna

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Mystery of the buried treasure

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Playing with friends

808.068  BIR

 Das

 Battle , victory, coronation and other stories from ramayana

808.068  BIR

 Das

 Birth of rama and other stories from ramayana

808.068  CHE-S

 Cheryl Rao

 Stories of Vikram and vetal

808.068  DAH-D

 Dahl, Roald

 Dirty Beasts

808.068  DAH-D

 Dahl, Roald

 Dirty Beasts

808.068  DAS-B

 Das, Rabindra Lal, ed.

 Battle,victory, coronation and stories from Ramayana

808.068  FAI

 

 Fairy tales wonderland: Little red riding hood

808.068  FAI

 

 Fairy tales: Little red riding hood

808.068  FAL-P

 Falk, Lee

 Phantom: The ghost who died twice, The chief of the stock people

808.068  FAL-P

 Falk, Lee

 Phantom: Aron , Hoogan’s revenge

808.068  GAR-F

 Garg

 Farm

808.068  GEO-C

 George, Arun M

 Crow and the cobra

808.068  GEO-C

 George, Arun M

 Clever Fox

808.068  GEO-F

 George, Arun M

 Four friends & the cunning cat

808.068  GEO-M

 George, Arun M

 Moonlake

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: The secret of the unicorn

808.068  JOS-N

 Joseph, Jeena Ann

 Noblest mind

808.068  JOS-O

 Joseph, Jeena Ann

 Old wine in a new bottle

808.068  JOS-T

 Joseph, Jeena Ann

 Tears and laughter

808.068  JOS-W

 Joseph, Jeena Ann

 Who is the killer?

808.068  LIT

 

 Little red riding hood

808.068  LIT-E

 Litta Jacob

 Emperor’s new Clothes

808.068  LIT-E

 Litta Jacob

 Thumbelina and the field mouse

808.068  LIT-J

 Litta Jacob

 Jumbo safari

808.068  LIT-L

 Litta Jacob

 Little Tikri

808.068  LIT-T

 Litta Jacob

 Thumbelina finds her true love

808.068  LIT-T

 Litta Jacob

 Thumbelina and her adventures

808.068  LUI-C

 Luiza Chandy

 Cinderella

808.068  LUI-L

 Luiza Chandy

 Little Red Riding Hood

808.068  LUI-L

 Luiza Chandy

 Little Mermaid

808.068  LUI-P

 Luiza Chandy

 Princess and the Pea

808.068  LUI-R

 Tanya Munshi

 Swineherd

808.068  LUI-R

 Luiza Chandy

 Rapunzel

808.068  LUI-S

 Luiza Chandy

 Snow white

808.068  MAM-C

 Mamata Pandya

 Catch me if you can

808.068  MIN-C

 Mini John

 Chimpu learns a lesson

808.068  MIN-J

 Mini John

 Jungle tales: Physicians in the jungle

808.068  MIN-N

 Mini John

 Naughty cub & the old banyan tree

808.068  MIN-N

 Mini John

 Nightingale

808.068  MIN-P

 Mini John

 Party in the jungle

808.068  MIN-S

 Mini John

 Snow queen

808.068  MUN-K

 Munshi, K M

 King of birds

808.068  MUN-S

 Munshi, Tanya

 Story of a dam

808.068  MUN-T

 Munshi, Tanya

 Two bachelors and a python

808.068  MUN-T

 Munshi, Tanya

 Tortoise and the eagle

808.068  OLI

 

 Oliver twist

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Puss in boots

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Sleeping beauty

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Cinderella

808.068  REA-H

 Reader’s World

 Hansel and Gretel

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 4 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 3 (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 5 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 5

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 3 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 3 (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  ROH-F

 Rohan Books

 Fairy Tales: Snow White and the seven dwarfs

808.068  ROH-F

 Rohan Books

 Fairy Tales: Puss in boots

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Snow white and the seven dwarfs

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Moral stories-The Miller’s son and the ass

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Abu Hassan, The sleeper

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Sleeping Beauty

808.068  SEE-E

 Seetha D

 Elves and the shoemaker

808.068  SEE-H

 Seena Subran

 Haunted kitchen & the sunken treasure

808.068  SEE-H

 Joseph, Jeena Ann

 Spendthrift king

808.068  SEE-M

 Seena Subran

 Mr. Blackie’s new home & the mischievous mouse

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part IV

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part IV

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part III

808.068  SHE-C

 Sheila Dhir

 Chandu Pottu

808.068  SHR-B

 Shree Books

 Bhima slays Vakasura

808.068  SHR-C

 Shree Books

 Churning of the Oceans

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Shiva and Bhasmasura

808.068  SHW-H

 Shwetha George

 Hazaar Maarya

808.068  SHW-M

 Shwetha E George

 Mulla Nasruddin: Candle does not give any heat

808.068  SHW-M

 Shwetha E George

 Mulla Nasruddin: Hiding the money

808.068  SIN

 

 Sindbad: tales from Arabian nights

808.068  SIN-F

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna

 From one dead rat to riches

808.068  SIN-G

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna, retold

 Greed gets you nowhere

808.068  SIN-H

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna

 Hard earned money

808.068  SIN-S

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna, retold

 Selfish fisherman

808.068  SIN-S

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna

 Smart follower

808.068  SIN-T

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna, retold

 The miser

808.068  SIN-W

 Singh, Arthy Muthanna

 Wonderful Mantra

808.068  SUP

 

 Super 100 activities

808.068  TAN-J

 Tanya Munshi

 Jabu and the lion

808.068  TAR-S

 Tarun Cherian

 Sun’s handkerchief

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Alice in wonderland

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Story of Rapunzel

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Little mermaid

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Hansel and Gretel

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Pinocchio

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Musicians of Bremem

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Pied piper

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Flying trunk

808.068  TIN-S

 Tiny Tot

 Cinderella

808.068  WIL-U

 Wilco Books

 Beauty and the Beast

820.8  BON-B

 Bond, Ruskin

 Book of nature

821  CBS-B

 CBSE

 Book of english poems

821  PAR-I

 Paranjape

 Indian poetry in English

821  TAG-P

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Poems of Kabir

821.08  AVA-P

 Avanti Maluste and Sudeep doshi, ed.

 Poem for cry: Favourite poems of famous Indians

821.08  MCG-S

 McGowran, Katharine

 Selected poems of Christina Rossetti

822.08  SHA-B

 Shaw, Bernard

 Best of Bernard Shaw Vol.1

822.08  SHA-B

 Shaw, Bernard

 Best of Bernard Shaw Vol.2

823  ADA-B

 Adamson, Joy

 Born free: The full story

823  ADV-A

 Advaita kala

 Almost single

823  ALI-C

 Alice’s adventures in wonderland: Through the looking glass and other writings

 Carroll, Lewis

823  AME-S

 Ameen Merchant

 Silent raga

823  ANA-T

 Ananda Pai, A

 Their longest night: based on sri valmiki ramayana

823  ANA-T

 Ananda Pai, A

 Their longest night: based on sri valmiki ramayana

823  ANY-A

 Any Kumar

 Atisa and the seven wonders

823  ARC-F

 Archer, Jeffrey

 First among equals

823  BAC-G

 Bach, Richard

 Gift of wings

823  BAC-O

 Bach, Richard

 One: a novel

823  BEA-A

 Beah, Ishmael

 A Long way gone

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Six o’ clock tales

823  BON-D

 Bond, Ruskin

 Delhi is not  far away: A novel

823  BOU-F

 Bourne, Sam

 Final reckoning

823  BUT-M

 Butcher, nancy

 Mary-kateandashley: Two of a kind diaries ; Two for the road

823  CAB-P

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: To the nines

823  CAB-P.G

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: Give me five

823  CAB-P.S

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: Seventh heaven

823  CAB-P.S

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: Sixsational

823  CAB-P.T

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: To the nines

823  CAB-P.T

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: Take two

823  CAB-P.T

 Cabot, Meg

 Princess diaries: Third time lucky

823  CEI-P

 Ceichton, Michael

 Prey

823  CHE-O

 Chetan Bhagat

 One night @ the call center

823  CHR-A

 Chrichton, Michael

 Andromeda strain

823  CHR-C

 Christie, Agatha

 Come, tell me how you live

823  CHR-C

 Chrichton, Michael

 Congo

823  CHR-N

 Chrichton, Michael

 Next

823  CHR-S

 Chrichton, Michael

 State of fear

823  COE-D

 Coelho, Paulo

 Devil and Miss Prym

823  COE-F

 Coelho, Paulo

 Fifth Mountain

823  COE-L

 Coelho, Paulo

 Like the flowing river

823  COE-M

 Coelho, Paulo

 Manual of the warrior of light

823  COL-A

 Colfer, Eoin

 Artemis Fowl and the opal deception

823  COL-A

 Colfer, Eoin

 Artemis Fowl and the Artic incident

823  COO-T

 Cook, Robin

 Terminal

823  CRI-T

 Crichton, Michael

 Terminal man

823  DEL-F

 Delinsky, Barbara

 Family tree

823  DES-C

 Desai, A R

 Cry, the Peacock

823  DIX-I

 Dixon, Franklin W

 In plane sight

823  FAN-S

 Fan, Nancy Yi

 Swordbird

823  GIK-W

 Gikow Louise A

 Mary-kateandashley: Two of a kind diaries ; Wish on a star

823  HAG-S

 Haggard, H Rider

 She: A history of adventure

823  IMP-S

 Impey, Rose

 Sleepover club at Lyndsey’s: Too scared to sleep

823  JON-S

 Jones, Jasmine

 Spider-Man 3

823  JOS-S

 Joshi, Arun

 Strange case of Billy Biswas

823  KAL-G

 Kalpana Swaminathan

 Gardener’s song: a lalli mystery

823  KIN-R

 King, Stephen

 Running man

823  LEW-C

 Lewis C S

 Chronicles of Narnia

823  LEW-H

 Lewis C S

 Horse and his boy

823  LEW-L

 Lewis C S

 Last battle

823  LEW-L

 Lewis C S

 Lion , the witch and the wardrob

823  LEW-M

 Lewis C S

 Magician’s nephew

823  LEW-P

 Lewis C S

 Prince Caspian

823  LEW-S

 Lewis C S

 Silver chair

823  LEW-V

 Lewis C S

 Voyage of the dawn treader

823  MAC-G

 Maclean, Alistair

 Golden gate

823  MAC-L

 Maclean, Alistair

 Last frontier

823  MAC-W

 Maclean, Alistair

 What eight bells toll

823  MAC-W

 Maclean, Alistair

 Where eagles dare

823  MAN-N

 Manto, Saadat Hasan

 Naked voices: Stories and sketches

823  MCE-A

 McEwan, Ian

 Amsterdam

823  MIT-G

 Mitchell, Margaret

 Gone with the wind

823  MOR-L

 Morrison, Toni

 Love

823  NAI-M

 Naipaul, V S

 Magic seeds

823  NAY-R

 Nayantara Sahgal & Mangat Rai E N

 Relationship

823  PAM-B

 Pamuk, Orhan

 Black  book

823  RUS-E

 Rushdie, Salman

 Enchantress of Florence

823  RUS-U

 Ruswa, Mirza Muhammad Hadi

 Umrao Jan ada: The courtesan of Lucknow

823  SAG-S

 Sage, Ancie

 Septimus heap: Book 1: Magyk

823  SAS-S

 Sashi Tharoor

 Show business: A novel

823  STI-C

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Camp nowhere

823  STI-F

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Full Moon Halloween

823  STI-H

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Howler

823  STI-L

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Liar liar

823  STI-M

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room: My name is evil

823  STI-M

 Stine, megan

 Mary-kateandashley: so little time girl talk

823  STI-N

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room: Don’t forget me!

823  STI-S

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Scare School

823  STI-T

 Stine, Megan

 Mary-kateandashley: Two of a kind ; The perfect gift

823  STI-V

 Stine, R.L.

 Nightmare room:Visitors

823  STO-D29

 Stoker, Bram

 Dracula

823  TOL-F

 Tolkien J R R

 Felloship of the ring

823  TOL-H

 Tolkien J R R

 Hobbit or there and back again

823  TOL-R

 Tolkien J R R

 Return of the king: Beieneg the third part of the Lord of the Rings

823  TOL-T

 Tolkien J R R

 Two flowers

823  WIL-S

 Willard, Eliza

 Mary-kateandashley: sweet 16 cross our hearts

823.01  HAM-G

 Hamalian, Leo and Volpe, Edmond, L., Ed.

 Great stories by Nobel prize winners

823.01  MUL-S

 Mulkraj Anand

 Selected short stories

823.08  BON-G

 Bond, Ruskin

 Green book

823.08  BON-R

 Bond, Ruskin, ed.

 Rupa’ Supernatural omnibus

823.08  GOP-B

 Gopa Majumdar, Tr.

 Best of satyajit Ray

823.08  KHU-B.1

 Khushwant Singh

 Best Indian short stories: 2 volumes

823.08  KHU-B.2

 Khushwant Singh

 Best Indian short stories: 2 volumes

823.08  PAM-O

 Pamuk, Orhan

 Other Colours: essays and a story

826  JAW-L

 Jawaharlal Nehru

 Letters from a father to his daughter

827  KHU-K

 Khushwant Singh

 Khushwant Singh’s joke book  III

8H0  HIN

 

 Hindi bhasha prbodhini

920  BER-L

 Berry, Lalit

 Life sketch of great women of India

920  DHA-I

 Dharker, Anil

 Icons: Men & women who shaped Today’s India

920  EZE-C

 Ezekiel, Gulu

 Captain cool: The M S Dhoni story

920  PAD-K

 Padmanabhan, Anil

 Kalpana chawla: a life

921  MAK-S

 Makarand Paranjabe, Ed

 Swami Vivekananda Reader

922.945  SAI-M

 Murphet, Howard

 Sai Baba: Man of miracles

954  AMI-K

 Amini, Iradj

 Koh-i-noor diamond

H 8H8  SHA-J

 Sharma, R K

 Jeevan shookti kosh

R  001  ASH-W

 Ash, Russell, ed.

 Whitaker’s World of Facts

R  423  WEB

 

 Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary

R  912  DK-C

 DK

 Concise atlas of the world: Digital mapping for the 21st century

Filed under: New Book Alert

50 things that are being killed by the internet

The internet has wrought huge changes on our lives – both positive and negative – in the fifteen years since its use became widespread.

By Matthew Moore
04 Sep 2009

Courtesy: www.newsweek.com

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The web is changing the way we work, play and think Photo: REUTTERS

Tasks that once took days can be completed in seconds, while traditions and skills that emerged over centuries have been made all but redundant.

The internet is no respecter of reputations: innocent people have seen their lives ruined by viral clips distributed on the same World Wide Web used by activists to highlight injustices and bring down oppressive regimes

Below we have compiled – in no particular order – 50 things that are in the process of being killed off by the web, from products and business models to life experiences and habits. We’ve also thrown in a few things that have suffered the hands of other modern networking gadgets, specifically mobile phones and GPS systems.

Do you agree with our selections? What other examples can you think of? Please post your comments on the bottom of the story – we hope include the best suggestions in a fuller list.

1) The art of polite disagreement
While the inane spats of YouTube commencers may not be representative, the internet has certainly sharpened the tone of debate. The most raucous sections of the blogworld seem incapable of accepting sincerely held differences of opinion; all opponents must have "agendas".

2) Fear that you are the only person unmoved by a celebrity’s death
Twitter has become a clearing-house for jokes about dead famous people. Tasteless, but an antidote to the "fans in mourning" mawkishness that otherwise predominates.

3) Listening to an album all the way through
The single is one of the unlikely beneficiaries of the internet – a development which can be looked at in two ways. There’s no longer any need to endure eight tracks of filler for a couple of decent tunes, but will "album albums" like Radiohead’s Amnesiac get the widespread hearing they deserve?

4) Sarah Palin
Her train wreck interviews with NBC’s Katie Couric were watched and re-watched millions of times on the internet, cementing the Republican vice-presidential candidate’s reputation as a politician out of her depth. Palin’s uncomfortable relationship with the web continues; she has threatened to sue bloggers who republish rumours about the state of her marriage.

5) Punctuality
Before mobile phones, people actually had to keep their appointments and turn up to the pub on time. Texting friends to warn them of your tardiness five minutes before you are due to meet has become one of throwaway rudenesses of the connected age.

6) Ceefax/Teletext
All sports fans of a certain age can tell you their favourite Ceefax pages (p341 for Test match scores, p312 for football transfer gossip), but the service’s clunking graphics and four-paragraph articles have dated badly. ITV announced earlier this year that it was planning to pull Teletext, its version.

7) Adolescent nerves at first porn purchase
The ubiquity of free, hard-core pornography on the web has put an end to one of the most dreaded rights rites of passage for teenage boys – buying dirty magazines. Why tremble in the WHSmiths queue when you can download mountains of filth for free in your bedroom? The trend also threatens the future of "porn in the woods" – the grotty pages of Razzle and Penthouse that scatter the fringes of provincial towns and villages.

8) Telephone directories
You can find Fly Fishing by J R Hartley on Amazon.

9) The myth of cat intelligence
The proudest household pets are now the illiterate butts of caption-based jokes. Icanhasreputashunback?

10) Watches
Scrabbling around in your pocket to dig out a phone may not be as elegant as glancing at a watch, but it saves splashing out on two gadgets.

11) Music stores
In a world where people don’t want to pay anything for music, charging them £16.99 for 12 songs in a flimsy plastic case is no business model.

12) Letter writing/pen pals
Email is quicker, cheaper and more convenient; receiving a handwritten letter from a friend has become a rare, even nostalgic, pleasure. As a result, formal valedictions like "Yours faithfully" are being replaced by "Best" and "Thanks".

13) Memory
When almost any fact, no matter how obscure, can be dug up within seconds through Google and Wikipedia, there is less value attached to the "mere" storage and retrieval of knowledge. What becomes important is how you use it – the internet age rewards creativity.

14) Dead time
When was the last time you spent an hour mulling the world out a window, or rereading a favourite book? The internet’s draw on our attention is relentless and increasingly difficult to resist.

15) Photo albums and slide shows
Facebook, Flickr and printing sites like Snapfish are how we share our photos. Earlier this year Kodak announced that it was discontinuing its Kodachrome slide film because of lack of demand.

16) Hoaxes and conspiracy theories
The internet is often dismissed as awash with cranks, but it has proved far more potent at debunking conspiracy theories than perpetuating them. The excellent Snopes.com continues to deliver the final, sober, word on urban legends.

17) Watching television together
On-demand television, from the iPlayer in Britain to Hulu in the US, allows relatives and colleagues to watch the same programmes at different times, undermining what had been one of the medium’s most attractive cultural appeals – the shared experience. Appointment-to-view television, if it exists at all, seems confined to sport and live reality shows.

18) Authoritative reference works
We still crave reliable information, but generally aren’t willing to pay for it.

19) The Innovations catalogue
Preposterous as its household gadgets may have been, the Innovations catalogue was always a diverting read. The magazine ceased printing in 2003, and its web presence is depressingly bland.

20) Order forms in the back pages of books
Amazon’s "Customers who bought this item also bought…" service seems the closest web equivalent.

21) Delayed knowledge of sporting results
When was the last time you bought a newspaper to find out who won the match, rather than for comment and analysis? There’s no need to fall silent for James Alexander Gordon on the way home from the game when everyone in the car has an iPhone.

22) Enforceable copyright
The record companies, film studios and news agencies are fighting back, but can the floodgates ever be closed?

23) Reading telegrams at weddings
Quoting from a wad of email printouts doesn’t have the same magic.

24) Dogging
Websites may have helped spread the word about dogging, but the internet offers a myriad of more convenient ways to organise no-strings sex with strangers. None of these involve spending the evening in lay-by near Aylesbury.

25) Aren’t they dead? Aren’t they gay?
Wikipedia allows us to confirm or disprove almost any celebrity rumour instantly. Only at festivals with no Wi-Fi signals can the gullible be tricked into believing that David Hasselhoff has passed away.

26) Holiday news ignorance
Glancing at the front pages after landing back at Heathrow used to be a thrilling experience – had anyone died? Was the government still standing? Now it takes a stern soul to resist the temptation to check the headlines at least once while you’re away.

27) Knowing telephone numbers off by heart
After typing the digits into your contacts book, you need never look at them again.

28) Respect for doctors and other professionals
The proliferation of health websites has undermined the status of GPs, whose diagnoses are now challenged by patients armed with printouts.

29) The mystery of foreign languages
Sites like Babelfish offer instant, good-enough translations of dozens of languages – but kill their beauty and rhythm.

30) Geographical knowledge
With GPS systems spreading from cars to smartphones, knowing the way from A to B is a less prized skill. Just ask the London taxi drivers who spent years learning The Knowledge but are now undercut by minicabs.

31) Privacy
We may attack governments for the spread of surveillance culture, but users of social media websites make more information about themselves available than Big Brother could ever hoped to obtain by covert means.

32) Chuck Norris’s reputation
The absurdly heroic boasts on Chuck Norris Facts may be affectionate, but will anyone take him seriously again?

33) Pencil cricket
An old-fashioned schoolboy diversion swept away by the Stick Cricket behemoth

34) Mainstream media
The Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Rocky Mountain News in the US have already folded, and the UK’s Observer may follow. Free news and the migration of advertising to the web threaten the basic business models of almost all media organisations.

35) Concentration
What with tabbing between Gmail, Twitter, Facebook and Google News, it’s a wonder anyone gets their work done. A disturbing trend captured by the wonderful XKCD webcomic.

36) Mr Alifi’s dignity Mr Tombe’s dignity
Twenty years ago, if you were a Sudanese man who was forced to marry a goat after having sex with it, you’d take solace that news of your shame would be unlikely to spread beyond the neighbouring villages. Unfortunately for Mr Alifi, his indiscretion came in the digital age – and became one of the first viral news stories.
As pointed out in the comments, Mr Alifi was just the goat’s owner. It was another man, Mr Tombe, who actually did the deed. Apologies and thanks to readers for drawing attention to the error. (#51 Unchallenged journalistic inaccuracy?)

37) Personal reinvention
How can you forge a new identity at university when your Facebook is plastered with photos of the "old" you?

38) Viktor Yanukovych
The Orange Revolution in Ukraine was organised by a cabal of students and young activists who exploited the power of the web to mobilise resistance against the old regime, and sweep Viktor Yushchenko to power.

39) The insurance ring-round
Their adverts may grate, but insurance comparison websites have killed one of the most tedious annual chores

40) Undiscovered artists
Posting paintings to deviantART and Flickr – or poems to writebuzz – could not be easier. So now the garret-dwellers have no excuses.

41) The usefulness of reference pages at the front of diaries
If anyone still digs out their diaries to check what time zone Lisbon is in, or how many litres there are to a gallon, we don’t know them.

42) The nervous thrill of the reunion
You’ve spent the past five years tracking their weight-gain on Facebook, so meeting up with your first love doesn’t pack the emotional punch it once did.

43) Solitaire
The original computer timewaster has been superseded by the more alluring temptations of the web. Ditto Minesweeper.

44) Trust in Nigerian businessmen and princes
Some gift horses should have their mouths very closely inspected.

45) Prostitute calling cards/ kerb crawling
Sex can be marketed more cheaply, safely and efficiently on the web than the street corner.

46) Staggered product/film releases
Companies are becoming increasingly draconian in their anti-piracy measure, but are finally beginning to appreciate that forcing British consumers to wait six months to hand over their money is not a smart business plan.

47) Footnotes
Made superfluous by the link, although Wikipedia is fighting a brave rearguard action.

48) Grand National trips to the bookmaker
Having a little flutter is much more fun when you don’t have to wade though a shop of drunks and ne’er-do-wells

49) Fanzines
Blogs and fansites offer greater freedom and community interaction than paper fanzines, and can be read by many more people.

50) Your lunchbreak
Did you leave your desk today? Or snaffle a sandwich while sending a few personal emails and checking the price of a week in Istanbul?

 

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