Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

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World Almanac for Kids: Site of the week

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http://www.worldalmanacforkids.com/

Published annually since 1996 and with more than 3 million copies sold to date, The World Almanac for Kids provides kids with the information they crave on thousands of subjects.

This site provides a big bundle of information useful for your projects and assignments. Try it.

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Filed under: Website of the week, , ,

If H1N1 Disrupts School, Pearson’s ‘Continuity of Learning’ Resources Keep the Doors to Learning Open

Response to Secretary of Education’s (U.S.) Call to Help Students During Absences

  • Press Release
  • Source: Pearson
  • On 9:00 am EDT, Wednesday October 28, 2009

 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — The education services, technology and school solutions company Pearson today announced its www.PearsonContinuity.com website offering print and online resources for students, parents, and teachers to continue education if attending school is not an option due to the H1N1 virus or other crisis.

Pearson’s School Solutions president Scott Drossos said, "We’ve created the www.PearsonContinuity.com website as a central repository where parents, students, and teachers can have access to our dedicated Pearson solutions and tools, and be able to easily link to numerous other resources." He added, "Pearson products and services are in almost every US school, and we have created additional offerings for everyone to assist them during this time of crisis."

Drossos said Pearson’s Continuity of Learning solutions include the company’s data management systems, digital and print-based educational content, and additional teacher, parent, and student support resources.

The Pearson "Continuity for Learning" offerings include:

Educational Content and Reinforcement of Learning

  • Virtual learning – Pearson’s MyLabsPlus online teaching and learning environment will offer at a nominal cost ($15 per student per course for 30 days) access to middle and high school courses in Algebra, Advanced Algebra, Geometry, Algebra Readiness, Reading and Writing. These courses are currently used by millions of students worldwide and include easy-to-use homework and personalized study plans, guided solutions, multimedia learning aids, quizzes and tests. The MyLabsPlus Technical Support Helpdesk will provide 24/7 phone, email, and chat support for students and instructors working in their courses.
  • The Pearson offerings include free access for all K-12 students to numerous online websites through its Family Education Network, the most widely viewed education site on the worldwide web:
    • www.Funbrain.com is a popular online destination for interactive, educational games for children of all ages. Engaging arcade-style and Flash games help build skills while making learning fun.
    • www.Poptropica.com is a virtual world for children to travel, play games, compete in head-to-head competition, and communicate safely. Kids can also read books, comics, and see movie clips while they play.
    • www.Infoplease.com provides an online encyclopedia, dictionary, and atlas, as well as an almanac with up-to-date country and state profiles, statistics, quizzes, and biographies.
    • www.Factmonster.com combines reference materials, facts, and trivia quizzes for children on all subjects. Parents, educators, and kids can get homework help and access almanacs, an encyclopedia, a dictionary, and an atlas.
  • ebooks – Students learning with Pearson’s reading, literature, math, science, social studies and other programs will have home access to Pearson SuccessNET’s online versions of the texts from home, with built in assessments, multimedia, and other features that make them suitable for a self-study environment.
  • Schools whose middle and high school students are using the NovaNET self-paced curriculum as a core curriculum or for credit recovery will have the option of adding additional access at a reduced cost in 30-day increments rather than the yearly fee.
  • Pearson’s "Knowledge Power" Take Home Learning Kits, available for Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 8, provide supplemental learning materials in the event that students must spend time away from school.. Schools or parents may choose to purchase the standalone mathematics and language arts Knowledge Power workbook for $7 –and have the option of purchasing additional science and social studies readers from the Pearson library.

Communication and Collaboration Tools: School Information Systems

  • For the 40 percent of school districts nationwide currently using a Pearson student management system, Pearson has developed solutions that allow educators to make timely data-driven decisions in the face of an emerging crisis or threat. These systems provide essential district-wide communication, data collection and reporting, and accurate student tracking capabilities, plus enable collaborative school-to-home outreach. Parents and students can access school and class announcements, homework assignment details, and teacher comments.
  • Pearson Schools Systems will offer "best practice" webinars to current customers to help them configure and optimize their student information systems and data management procedures to effectively address disruptions to normal district or school business (e.g. increased student absenteeism, school closures, or modified instructional schedules).

Teacher Resources

  • For the hundreds of thousands of teachers currently using a Pearson program in their classroom, they have access to:
    • MyPearsonTraining website, providing online tutorials and webinars aligned to Pearson’s texts and educational programs for preK through High School (Scott Foresman and Prentice Hall) including math, science, social studies and humanities, reading, literature, and language arts.
    • Pearson’s Community Connection product support and webinars for digital programs, including: NovaNET, Waterford Early Reading and Math, SuccessMaker, ELLIS and Write to Learn. Training guides for all products are available for download.
  • For teachers everywhere, Pearson’s Family Education Network offers:
    • TeacherVision.com, the one-stop teacher resource for grade-specific lesson plans, classroom-management advice, student activities, educational printables, graphic organizers, and more, is available at no cost for a seven-day period.
    • MyGradeBook.com, a fast and effective way to track grades online and enhance communication between teachers, students, and parents–while keeping teachers organized, is available free for 30 days.

Through the Pearson Foundation, Pearson has a history of assisting in providing large-scale disaster help to schools and communities, most notably in recent years through its ongoing response to Hurricane Katrina victims, to other hurricane disasters affecting the Southeast and Gulf Coast, and to victims of the Iowa floods. Globally, Pearson has provided support to victims of the devastating hurricanes in Myanmar, the earthquakes in Northern China, Pakistan and India, as well as the South Asian tsunami.

In announcing the Department of Education’s Continuity of Learning initiative in August, Secretary Arne Duncan acknowledged Pearson as one of the Department’s partners for "Continuity of Learning" due to the H1N1 virus or other crisis situations.

For more information on Pearson’s Continuity of Learning offerings, go to www.PearsonContinuity.com

About Pearson

Pearson (NYSE: PSONews), the global leader in education services, technology and school solutions, provides innovative print and digital education materials for preK through college, student information systems and learning management systems, teacher professional development, career certification programs, and testing and assessment products that set the standard for the industry. Pearson’s other primary businesses include the Financial Times Group and the Penguin Group. For more information about Pearson School, go to www.pearsonschool.com.

Information courtesy: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/If-H1N1-Disrupts-School-prnews-1141511027.html?x=0&.v=1

Filed under: Snippets, , ,

ISLD Competition winners

  1. Book jacket Designing competition (26/10/2009)

S.No.

Group

Position

Name, Class & Div.

1

IX-XII


I

Prathibha G., IX A

II

Nithin T., XI D

III

Vivek R., XI D

VI-VIII

I

Athul Roy, VIII D

II

Rohan M. Roy, VII D

III

Aswajith M., VII D

III

Abhilash S., VIII D


Consol.

Kevin Mathews, VII D

    2.   Spot Poetry competition (26/10/2009)

S.No.

Group

Position

Name, Class & Div.

IX-XII

I

Naveen John Panicker, XII E

I

Salini Johnson, XI A

II

Prathibha G., IX A

III

Sobhita Elizabeth Shaji, IX B

VI-VIII

I

Malavika R J, VII B

II

Aajma Manoj, VII C

III

Athul Raj, VIII D

   3.     Literary Quiz Competition (27/10/2009)

S.No.

Position

Name, Class & Div.

I

Salini Johnson, XI A

II

Varun H. S, X B

III

Anurag, XI A

Library Lot (27/10/2009)

Name of the winner: Kevin Mathews, VII D

SHIFT-II

1. Jacket Designing competition

S.No.

Group

Position

Name, Class & Div.

1.

VI-VIII

I

Anand. V VII B

2.

II

Chetan S. Jayan VII B

3.

4.


5.

III

III

Consola-tion

Aravind. M VII A

Hari Narayanan.S VIIB


Ameen sidhique VII A

6.

IX-XII

I

Manoj. M.S. XIB

5.

II

Akshay Kumar.P XIB

6.

III

III

Mahesh. R XIB

Gokul Krishna XIA

2.  Spot poetry writing competition

S.No.

Group

Position

Name, Class & Div.

VI-VIII

I

Radhika P VII B

II

II

Aswathy Venugopal VII A

Aravind M VII A

III

Aswathy P Rajiv VII B

Reshma L. R. VII B

IX-XII

I

Ananthan. V X B

II

II

Vinyak Rajkumar IX B

Binny Tom IX A

III

Kiran S. Baby X B

3. Library Lot (27/10/2009)

Filed under: Winners of library competitions, ,

Developing a Reading culture: ISLD 2009

 

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International School Library Day 2009

The Library Media centre at Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom celebrated International School Library Day with various programmes from 26-28 October 2009.

Competitions were held on Book jacket designing, spot poetry and literary quiz. A large number of students participated in the competitions. There was a Library Lot on 28th October 2009. A talk and interactive session by Dr. Dr. A. Gopikkuttan, HOD, Dept. of Library & Information Science, University of Kerala was one of the main attractions. He shared his thoughts on libraries, books and reading. He urged the students to become information literate to reach their goals.

The prizes for the winners of the competitions were also distributed in the function. Dr. Cicy Roy Mathew, Principal chaired the programme.

The Day was celebrated first time in the Vidyalaya and was a great success. Proclaiming the importance of school libraries on the academic and overall achievement of the students was the main aim of the event.

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Dr. Cicy Roy Mathew, Principal

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Dr. A. Gopikkuttan, HOD, Dept. of Library & Information Science, University of Kerala

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Talk on libraries, books and reading

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Interactive session

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Prize distribution to the winners

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Mr. B. Surendran, Librarian, Shift-II

Filed under: Library activities, , , , , ,

Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel

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by Hilary Mantel

653pp, Fourth Estate, £18.99

(Now on display in your Library Call No. 823 MAN-W)

Read here one review by

Christopher Tayler

Courtesy: The Guardian

 

Thomas Cromwell, the chief minister to Henry VIII who oversaw the break with Rome and the dissolution of the monasteries, was widely hated in his lifetime, and he makes a surprising fictional hero now. Geoffrey Elton used to argue that he founded modern government, but later historians have pared back his role, and one recent biographer, Robert Hutchinson, portrayed him as a corrupt proto-Stalinist. He’s a sideshow to Wolsey in Shakespeare and Fletcher’s Henry VIII, a villain who hounds Thomas More to his death in Robert Bolt’s A Man for All Seasons. Law and financial administration – his main activities – don’t always ignite writers’ imaginations, and in the pop-Foucauldian worldview of much historical fiction since the 1980s, his bureaucratic innovations would be seen as inherently sinister. Then there’s the portrait of him, after Holbein: a dewlapped man in dark robes with a shrewd, unfriendly face, holding a folded paper like an upturned dagger. He looks, as Hilary Mantel has him say in her new novel, "like a murderer".

Wolf Hall, Mantel persuasively depicts this beefy pen-pusher and backstairs manoeuvrer as one of the most appealing – and, in his own way, enlightened – characters of the period. Taking off from the scant evidence concerning his early life, she imagines a miserable childhood for him as the son of a violent, drunken blacksmith in Putney. Already displaying toughness, intelligence and a gift for languages, he runs away to the continent as a boy of 15 or so (his date of birth isn’t known, and in the novel he doesn’t know it himself). At this point, only 16 pages in, the action cuts to 1527, with Cromwell back in England, "a little over forty years old" and a trusted agent of Cardinal Wolsey. His life-shaping experiences in France, Italy and the Netherlands are dealt with in flashback here and there: he has been a soldier, a trader and an accountant for a Florentine bank; he has killed a man and learned to appreciate Italian painting.

Mantel’s Cromwell is an omnicompetent figure, "at home in courtroom or waterfront, bishop’s palace or inn yard. He can draft a contract, train a falcon, draw a map, stop a street fight, furnish a house and fix a jury." Fluent in many languages, learned, witty and thoughtful, he’s also an intimidating physical presence; Wolsey fondly compares him to "one of those square-shaped fighting dogs that low men tow about on ropes". This makes him an ideal emissary for Wolsey’s project of liquidating some smaller monasteries to fund a school and an Oxford college. But self-advancement isn’t Cromwell’s only motive. He’s disgusted by the waste and superstition he encounters, and takes a materialist view of relics and indulgences. The feudal mindset of Wolsey’s rival grandees seems equally outdated to him: jibes at his lowly origins bounce off his certainty that noble blood and feats of arms now count for less than lines of credit and nicely balanced books.

The first half of the novel, built around Wolsey’s fall from power, details Cromwell’s domestic setup at Austin Friars and introduces the major players in Tudor politics. Without clobbering the reader with the weight of her research, Mantel works up a 16th-century world in which only a joker would call for cherries in April or lettuce in December, and where hearing an unlicensed preacher is an illicit thrill on a par with risking syphilis. The civil wars that brought the Tudors to the throne still make older people shudder, bringing Henry’s obsession with producing a male heir into focus. And the precarious nature of early modern life is brought home by the abrupt deaths of Cromwell’s wife and daughters, carried off by successive epidemics in moving but unsentimentally staged scenes. Cromwell asks if he can bury his elder daughter with a copybook she’s written her name in; "the priest says he has never heard of such a thing".

Grieving, he thinks of Tyndale’s banned English Bible: "now abideth faith, hope and love, even these three; but the greatest of these is love." More, he knows, thinks "love" is "a wicked mistranslation. He insists on ‘charity’ . . . He would, for a difference in your Greek, kill you." In the second half of the novel – which charts Cromwell’s rise to favour as he clears the way for the king’s marriage to Anne Boleyn – More emerges as Cromwell’s opposite number, more a spokesman for another worldview than a practical antagonist. Shabbily dressed, genial, yet punctiliously correct on politically controversial points, this More is a far cry from Bolt’s gentle humanist martyr. He’s made repulsive even more by the self-adoring theatricality behind his modest exterior than by his interest in torturing heretics and contemptuous treatment of his wife. He ends up stage-managing his own destruction out of narcissism and fanaticism, or at best a cold idealism that’s contrasted unfavourably with Cromwell’s reforming worldliness.

For all its structural and thematic importance, however, Cromwell’s conflict with More is only part of a wider battle caused by Henry’s desire to have his first marriage annulled. Much space is given over to court politics, which Mantel manages to make comprehensible without downplaying its considerable complexity. Central figures – the Boleyn sisters, Catherine of Aragon, the young Mary Tudor, the king himself – are brought plausibly to life, as are Cromwell’s wife, Liz Wykys, and Cardinal Wolsey. Determined, controlled but occasionally impulsive, and a talented hater, Mantel’s Anne Boleyn is a more formidable character even than her uncle the Duke of Norfolk, portrayed here as a scheming old warhorse who rattles a bit when he moves on account of all the relics and holy medals concealed about his person.

Making characters of all these people is, of course, a big risk. How do you write about Henry VIII without being camp or breathless or making him do something clunkily non-stereotypical? Mantel attacks the problem from several angles, starting by knowing a lot about the period but not drawing attention to how strenuously she’s imagining it. Meaty dialogue takes precedence over description, and the present-tense narration is so closely tied to the main character that Cromwell is usually called plain "he", even when it causes ambiguities. Above all, Mantel avoids ye olde-style diction, preferring more contemporary phrasing. Small rises in the level of language are frequently used for comic effect, as in: "Well, I tell you, Lady Shelton, if she had had an axe to hand, she would have essayed to cut off my head." The effortless-seeming management of contrasting registers plays a big part in the novel’s success, as does Mantel’s decision to let Cromwell have a sense of humour.

"Love your neighbour. Study the market. Increase the spread of benevolence. Bring in better figures next year." If not a man for all seasons, the book’s heroic accountant is surely the man for his season. Mantel keeps too close an eye on facts and emotions to make her story an arch allegory of modern Britain’s origins, but her setting of such unglamorous virtues as financial transparency and legal clarity against the forces of reaction and mystification is interesting and mildly provocative. At the same time, sinister grace notes accompany Cromwell’s triumph. Wolf Hall, the Seymour family seat, is a site of scandal in the novel, a place where men prey on women and the old on the young. It’s also where Jane Seymour first caught Henry’s eye – an event that falls just outside the book’s time scheme, but which serves as a reminder that, whatever their status in 1535, most of the major characters will end up with their heads on the block.

Mantel is a prolific, protean figure who doesn’t fit into many of the established pigeonholes for women writers, and whose output ranges from the French revolution (A Place of Greater Safety) to her own troubled childhood (Giving Up the Ghost). Maybe this book will win one of the prizes that have been withheld so far. A historian might wonder about the extent to which she makes Cromwell a modern rationalist in Renaissance dress; a critic might wonder if the narrator’s awe at the central character doesn’t sometimes make him seem as self-mythologising as his enemies. But Wolf Hall succeeds on its own terms and then some, both as a non-frothy historical novel and as a display of Mantel’s extraordinary talent. Lyrically yet cleanly and tightly written, solidly imagined yet filled with spooky resonances, and very funny at times, it’s not like much else in contemporary British fiction. A sequel is apparently in the works, and it’s not the least of Mantel’s achievements that the reader finishes this 650-page book wanting more.

Courtesy: The Guardian

Filed under: Book of the week, , ,

Getting It Wrong: Surprising Tips on How to Learn

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New research makes the case for hard tests, and suggests an unusual technique that anyone can use to learn

By Henry L. Roediger and Bridgid Finn

Courtesy: http:// www.scientificamerican.com

 

For years, many educators have championed “errorless learning," advising teachers (and students) to create study conditions that do not permit errors. For example, a classroom teacher might drill students repeatedly on the same multiplication problem, with very little delay between the first and second presentations of the problem, ensuring that the student gets the answer correct each time.

The idea embedded in this approach is that if students make errors, they will learn the errors and be prevented (or slowed) in learning the correct information. But research by Nate Kornell, Matthew Hays and Robert Bjork at U.C.L.A. that recently appeared in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition reveals that this worry is misplaced. In fact, they found, learning becomes better if conditions are arranged so that students make errors.

People remember things better, longer, if they are given very challenging tests on the material, tests at which they are bound to fail. In a series of experiments, they showed that if students make an unsuccessful attempt to retrieve information before receiving an answer, they remember the information better than in a control condition in which they simply study the information. Trying and failing to retrieve the answer is actually helpful to learning. It’s an idea that has obvious applications for education, but could be useful for anyone who is trying to learn new material of any kind.

In one of their experiments, students were required to learn pairs of “weak associates,” words that are loosely related such as star-night or factory-plant. (If students are given the first word and asked to generate an associate, the probability of generating the target word is only 5 percent.) In the pretest condition, students were given the first word of the pair (star– ???) and told to try to generate the second member that they would have to later remember. They had 8 seconds to do so. Of course, almost by definition, they nearly always failed to generate the correct answer. They might generate bright in the case of star-???. At that point they were given the target pair (star–night) for 5 seconds. In the control condition, students were given the pair to study for 13 seconds, so in both conditions there were a total of 13 seconds of study time for the pair.

The team found that students remembered the pairs much better when they first tried to retrieve the answer before it was shown to them. In a way this pretesting effect is counterintuitive: Studying a pair for 13 seconds produces worse recall than studying the pair for 5 seconds, if students in the latter condition spent the previous 8 seconds trying to retrieve or guess the answer. But the effect averaged about 10 percent better recall, and occurred both immediately after study and after a delay averaging 38 hours.

Some readers may look askance at the use of word pairs, even though it is a favorite tactic of psychologists. In another article, in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Lindsey Richland, Nate Kornell and Liche Kao asked the same question, but they used more educationally relevant text material (an essay on vision). Students were asked to read the essay and prepare for a test on it. However, in the pretest condition they were asked questions about the passage before reading it such as “What is total color blindness caused by brain damage called?” Asking these kinds of question before reading the passage obviously focuses students’ attention on the critical concepts. To control this “direction of attention” issue, in the control condition students were either given additional time to study, or the researchers focused their attention on the critical passages in one of several ways: by italicizing the critical section, by bolding the key term that would be tested, or by a combination of strategies. However, in all the experiments they found an advantage in having students first guess the answers. The effect was about the same magnitude, around 10 percent, as in the previous set of experiments.

This work has implications beyond the classroom. By challenging ourselves to retrieve or generate answers we can improve our recall. Keep that in mind next time you turn to Google for an answer, and give yourself a little more time to come up with the answer on your own.

Students might consider taking the questions in the back of the textbook chapter and try to answer them before reading the chapter. (If there are no questions, convert the section headings to questions. If the heading is Pavlovian Conditioning, ask yourself What is Pavlovian conditioning?). Then read the chapter and answer the questions while reading it. When the chapter is finished, go back to the questions and try answering them again. For any you miss, restudy that section of the chapter. Then wait a few days and try to answer the questions again (restudying when you need to). Keep this practice up on all the chapters you read before the exam and you will be have learned the material in a durable manner and be able to retrieve it long after you have left the course.

Of course, these are general-purpose strategies and work for any type of material, not just textbooks. And remember, even if you get the questions wrong as you self-test yourself during study the process is still useful, indeed much more useful than just studying. Getting the answer wrong is a great way to learn.

Courtesy: http:// www.scientificamerican.com

Filed under: Article of the Week,

E-Quiz

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Questions

1. Fred Berenson, a research associate at New York University, is to write which American classic entirely in emoticons?

2. What is the term used for picture characters or emoticons used in Japanese wireless messages and webpages?

3. Which Amazon endeavour has the tagline ‘Artificial Artificial Intelligence’?

4. The medals for which sporting extravaganza is to be made from e-waste or metal from recycled TVs, computers, and keyboards?

5. Sheryl Sandberg is the COO of…?

6. What is the nationality of the company which makes the popular anti-virus AVG software?

7. ‘The Impossible Project’ is a scheme to reinvent which iconic product in the world of photography after the company ceased its manufacture?

8. Who has launched a mission for kids called ‘Mission: 10,000 Rockets’?

9. Google’s proposed new service that will deliver e-books to anyone with a Web browser is to be called…?

10. Which co-founder of Sun Microsystems remarked about Steve Ballmer “[Bill] Gates is over the top, but Ballmer’s mad, he’s insane.”?

 

Answers

1. Moby Dick.

2. Emoji.

3. The Amazon Mechanical Turk, a marketplace for work that requires human intelligence.

4. Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

5. Facebook.

6. Czech.

7. Polaroid instant film.

8. Bing.

9. Google Editions.

10. Bill Joy.

Courtesy: V V Ramanan, Business Line.

Filed under: YW-Cyber Quiz,

ISLD 2009: Library competitions in photos

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Book jacket designing competition

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Spot Poetry Competition

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Literary Quiz

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Library Lot

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Display of New Books

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Filed under: Library activities, ,

Quiz Time

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Questions

1. Simple one to begin with. Who created Asterix and his world?

2. Name the magazine that brought the world of the Gauls to us way back in 1959.

3. In how many adventures have our heroes featured so far (including the new adventure released last week)?

4. Who are Astronomix and Vanilla?

5. Name the only two adventures not to have the name of Asterix in the title.

6. Which was the first album and which was the one the creators working on Goscinny passed away in 1977?

7. Name the translators who have done a fantastic job of bringing the adventures alive complete with ‘punny’ jokes to millions of English readers.

8. ‘Asterix and the Banquet’ gave us, depending on the translation, Ideefix, Kutta Bhaunkix or Snupix. How do we better know this integral character?

9. Why can’t Obelix have magic potion when the rest of the villagers can take it?

10. In the context of English versions of the books, what is so special about the plate on Page 35 of the first adventure?

11. Name all the three live-action films made on the adventures of our friends.

12. Over the last 50 years, many a memorable name has been part of the series. So in which book do we meet: (i): Ptenisnet, (ii): Anticlimax, (iii): Cassius Ceramix?

13. Our heroes have also made a visit to our country. In which adventure?

14. What can one visit at Plailly, about 35 km north of Paris, in the département of Oise?

15. Which was the first adventure to be written and drawn by Albert Uderzo alone?

Answers

Answers:

1. Rene Goscinny and Albert Uderzo
2. ‘Pilote’
3. Thirty four translated into 107 languages or dialects
4. The father of Asterix and mother of Obelix
5. ‘The Mansions of the Gods’ and ‘Obelix & Co’
6. ‘Asterix the Gaul’ and ‘Asterix in Belgium’
7. Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge
8. Dogmatix
9. Because of falling into a cauldron of the potion as a kid
10. It was redrawn by Albert Uderzo’s brother Marcel in 1970 because the original was lost
11. ‘Asterix and Obelix take on Caesar’, ‘Asterix & Obelix: Mission Cleopatra’ and ‘Asterix at the Olympic Games’
12. (i): ‘Asterix the Gladiator’, (ii): ‘Asterix in Britain’, (iii): ‘Asterix and the Big Fight’
13. ‘Asterix and the Magic Carpet’
14. Parc Asterix
15. ‘Asterix and the Great Divide’

Courtesy: V V Ramanan, The Hindu

Filed under: Young World Quiz,

International School Library Day 2009

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New Indian Express, 26 October 2009

Filed under: Library in the News, ,

Archives

Infobreak

Infobreak

Real time News on Kendriya Vidyalayas on the web

Little Open Library (LOLib)

Tools for Every Teacher (TET)

KV Pattom in Media

FaB Best Performers 2017-’18

Meera Nair & Kalyani Santhosh

Face a Book Challenge

e-reading hub @ Your Library

Follow Us on Twitter

Learn anything freely with Khan Academy Library of Content

A free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.

Interactive challenges, assessments, and videos, on any topic of your interest.

Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8004 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

Population Stabilization in India Toll Free Helpline

Dial 1800-11-6555 for expert advice on reproductive, maternal and child health; adolescent and sexual health; and family planning.

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com