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Model Question Papers for Classes X and XII

Class X

Hindi-A Hindi-B Sanskrit Urdu

 

Class XII Hindi Core Hindi Elective English Elective

Sanskrit Core Sanskrit Elective Urdu Core Urdu Elective

Mathematics Chemistry Biology Business Studies

courtesy -NCERT

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Filed under: Downloads,

HOTS Class XII (Humanities), 2009-2010

 

Courtesy: ZIET Mumbai

Filed under: Downloads,

World AIDS Day 2009

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December 01 is World AIDS Day

Universal Access and Human Rights is the theme for World AIDS Day 2009-2010.

World AIDS Day, 1 December, is one of the most recognised international health days and a key opportunity to raise further awareness in communities and across the world about the state of the pandemic, and critical next steps that must be taken to halt its spread.

 

The theme

Universal Access and Human Rights

The – I AM theme

Background

The World AIDS Campaign arrived at the selection of the theme Universal Access and Human Rights after close consultation with representatives of various constituencies, communications and media representatives of partner organizations, and friends of the World AIDS Campaign.

Why I AM?

Understanding HIV and AIDS from a human rights perspective can be difficult. Human rights are often misunderstood and can sometimes be seen as abstract ideals with not much practical relevance for real people. The slogans for the World AIDS Day materials were designed to bridge that gap and underscore the importance of awareness of Human Rights.

Among the key slogans adopted:
I am accepted.
I am safe.
I am getting treatment.
I am well
I am living my rights.
Everyone deserves to live their rights
Right to Live
Right to Health
Access for all to HIV prevention treatment care and support is a critical part of human rights.

The aim was to provide concise, informative texts designed to illustrate the relationship between Human Rights and Universal Access.

Supporting materials are now available in campaigning packages (four posters and two post cards) printed in English, Spanish, French and Russian. These are also be available to download from our website. Arabic, Mandarin, Hindi and Portuguese versions are also available to download from our website.

Background to the theme ‘Universal Access and Human Rights’

 

Get Involved

Why should you get more actively involved with the WAC?

The WAC was established to support and promote a global campaign on HIV and AIDS. The campaign strengthens and connects together many of the AIDS-related advocacy and campaigns happening in our countries and regions – each are supported by a multitude of groups who are demanding that their governments and other key stakeholders deliver on previous promises and commitments on HIV and AIDS.

The civil society-led WAC campaign targets politicians and policy-makers countries most affected by HIV as well as donor governments, international agencies such as those of the United Nations, as well as civil society. It supports people and organisations to work together more closely, unite and soundly advocate at the national and international levels, so the campaign can deepen the partnership for a stronger response to AIDS.

The WAC hopes to build on the diverse strengths and contribution of individuals and organisations by first encouraging them to pledge their own leadership in the response to HIV and AIDS. . Organisations who register as partners have an important role to play also by influencing national leaders. The campaign stresses that individuals and organisations can make a difference through personal pledges, statements of commitment, and by taking action to reverse the epidemic. Added together, these commitments can also make governments realise that a wide range of people and organisations care about HIV and AIDS and want to be part of an effective response.

How to get involved:

Sign up for the newsletter and action alerts

Get involved with local civil society campaigns

Use our campaign tools in your own campaigns

 

Courtesy :  http://www.worldaidscampaign.org/en

 

 

More Resources

http://www.worldaidscampaign.org/en

 

HIV/AIDS Polulation  Statistics

http://www.aids-india.org/

National AIDS control Organization, India (NACO)

Filed under: Article of the Week, , ,

An interview with the Librarian

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News at 2 PM, November 27-December 04, 2009

Filed under: Library in the News

Man Asian literary prize goes to Su Tong

Chinese writer Su Tong wins the Man Asian literary Prize for 2009 for his book “ Boat to Redemption”.

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                   Su Tong

 

Read here a short note by

Alison Flood

Courtesy: guardian.co.uk

The story of a playboy Communist party official who castrates himself after he is banished to live on a river barge has won celebrated Chinese author Su Tong the Man Asian literary prize.

Su, by far the best known of the five shortlisted authors, is the second Chinese writer to win the three-year-old prize, which is worth $10,000 (£6,000). Judges, including the authors Colm Tóibín and Pankaj Mishra, said in a joint statement that his winning title, The Boat to Redemption, was "a picaresque novel of immense charm".

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"It is also a political fable with an edge which is both comic and tragic, and a parable about the journeys we take in our lives, the distance between the boat of our desires and the dry land of our achievement," they said in a statement. Set during the Cultural Revolution, the novel tells the story of a womanising official who tries to rebuild his life on a boat with his young son after his lineage as the son of a revolutionary mother is questioned. "I’m not sure if The Boat to Redemption can help overseas readers know more about China. It’s just a novel centering on the fate of people caught in an absurd time," Su told China Daily.

"A nation must have the courage to face its own history, whether it’s glorious or shameful, beautiful or grey. Misunderstandings often come from hiding and evasion. After all, a novel does not stand for the truth of history, so I’m not afraid of misunderstanding."

He beat a strong contingent of writers from the Indian subcontinent to take the prize, including the Indian writers Omair Ahmad and Siddharth Chowdhury and the Kashmiri Indian Nitasha Kaul. Filipino writer Eric Gamalinda was also shortlisted.

The Man Asian award goes to an "Asian" novel unpublished in English, with the intention of bringing "exciting new Asian authors to the attention of the world literary community". Its definition of Asian excludes countries such as Iran, Turkey and all the central Asian Stans.

Su, 46, is a bestselling author in China and is hardly unknown overseas. He gained an international readership when his novella Wives and Concubines was filmed as the Oscar-nominated and Bafta-winning Raise the Red Lantern in 1991. The author of six novels including Rice (2004) and My Life as Emperor (2006), The Boat to Redemption is already lined up for publication in the UK in January next year, translated by Howard Goldblatt, who also translated 2007’s winner of the Man Asian prize, Chinese writer Jiang Rong’s Wolf Totem. That novel is currently being adapted for the screen by French director Jean-Jacques Annaud.

Last year’s prize was won by Filipino writer Miguel Syjuco’s novel Ilustrado.

Exlpore More: www.manasianliteraryprize.org

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KV Pattom Library Blog chosen to the “Hall of Fame: Selected Virtual School Libraries” by skolebibliotek (Norway)

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This School Library Blog of Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom is selected to the “Hall of Fame: Selected Virtual School Libraries” by Skolebibliotek (Norway).

The Blog is included in the Other World session, the only one from India.

The blog is commented as “ Advanced use of Web 2.0 on a wordpress blog- good structure”

Visit the site here http://skolebibliotek.ning.com/group/virtuellskolebibliotek/forum/topics/hall-of-fame-selected-virtual

Short url : http://z.pe/t9D

Congrats to All !

Filed under: Snippets,

A Fine Balance: Book review

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A Fine Balance

by

Rohinton Mistry

Perhaps the first thing that catches your eye about A Fine Balance penned by the veteran author Rohinton Mistry, recipient of many accolades and whose books have been shortlisted for the Booker Prize many a time, would be the chunkiness of the book, what with the story spreading out to more than six hundred pages. A Fine Balance is undoubtedly a meticulously written novel, rich in superfluous detail, which is set mainly in the 1975 India. It has a certain charm and rawness entwined to it that would make sure that the reader sticks on to its pages which are overflowing with the naiveté of the proletariat.

The novel literally maintains a fine balance between the stories of the four protagonists who meet at one point of the book, during and after which their lives are altered beyond imaginable ways but mostly ending up at heartbreaking crossroads. At first comes Dina Shroff, a girl based in the then Bombay in a well-to-do Parsi family. Her narrative revolves mainly around her family who was shattered by the passing away of her father which culminates in her mean brother, with his hypocritical ideals, taking the control of the house. This finally leads to an abrupt end to Dina’s education. Later, she meets Rustom Dalal and turns into Mrs. Dina Dalal as she is known throughout the rest of the story. Her husband, who is too good to be real, dies in a freak hit-and-run accident at the night of their third wedding anniversary, which leaves a traumatized Dina behind. She was determined enough for a young widow to say an outright no to a second marriage and to refuse a place under her brother’s roof, probably ending up as an unpaid servant for life! But instead she strived to fend for herself with help from one of her childhood friends.

Parting with Dina’s narrative for now, the pages take us to “In a village by a river” where we are introduced to Ishvar, Narayan, later Om and the story of their ancestors. This area of the book is ostensibly nothing but a tale of woe sometimes taking on a harsher version reducing us to tears. It deals with the caste system and the outrageous brutality of the loathsome landlords who deserve to be ripped apart. The effectual and overpowering account rendered by Rohinton Mistry in his fluid flow of language enrages the reader to act against the despicable acts of the so-called upper caste men upon the destitute.

Then again as life moves on, we move on to Maneck Kohlah, a boy leading quite a carefree life up in the mountains inhaling lungful of fresh, pure air each morning, absolutely oblivious to the lives down in the cities. In this part of the novel, we are treated to the frivolities of the families in the mountains, co-existing in complete harmony and wrapped up in their personal worlds of blithe. Ishvar and Om as tailors and Maneck as a paying guest find themselves at Dina’s house. Gradually they steer clear of their prejudices and make quite a company! But nothing too good stays for long. And so the merciless hands of fate unclenched apart their bonds of intimacy and friendship and strewed them across for their own destinies to devour them.

A Fine Balance does a lot of talk on the Internal Emergency declared in India during the setting of the novel. It does compel the reader to put your thinking cap on and frown. The author is visibly taking a harsh and cut-and –dried stand against the then Prime Minister, even making a complete mockery of her at one instance of the plot. But, all the same, the opinion whether biased or not all depends on the mindset of the reader. But one thing we can never deny is the fact that Rohinton Mistry has once again proved his sinuous style of unfolding the chronicles of the hoi polloi with such passion, rawness, simplicity and candor that it is next to impossible not to keep the pages turning and finally reach 614th page!

Reviwed by

Salini Johnson

Class: XI-A (Shift-I)

Filed under: Book Reviews, ,

101 Books Every Woman Should Read

Posted by sinlung on Nov 9th, 2009

Courtesy: http://www.sinlung.com

 

(Here is a selection of 101 books that everyone (not only women) should read)

With so many books available, it can be difficult to decide which books you want to add to your reading list. This listing of 101 books every woman should read will make that task a bit easier. Browse through these categories, which include classics; children’s literature; books that were made into movies; literature that highlights families, the strength of women, and coming of age; recent literature; books about incredible women and their accomplishments; and important non-fiction books written by women.

Classics

These classic books tell tales of love, strong characters, painful lessons learned, and family. These classics are not to be missed.

  1. The Awakening by Kate Chopin. Feeling trapped and unhappy with the way her life has turned out, Edna reaches for a different path and ultimately finds her freedom in a tragic form.
  2. Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger. A story in two parts, the first story is about Franny as she experiences an existential crisis and has a sort of breakdown. The second half is told from her brother, Zooey’s, point of view as he helps her get through her crisis.
  3. Frankenstein by Mary Shelly. Mary Shelly’s classic tale of the desire to control nature and the personal responsibility that comes with such actions is a must-read for everyone.
  4. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. A massive book, this one will require some dedication, but is worth reading for the strong characters Rand created and her theory of objectivism played throughout the story.
  5. Howards End by E.M. Forester. The sisters in this novel set in early twentieth century England guide the reader through an exploration of class as their relationships evolve.
  6. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The life lessons young Scout learns in this book teach her to see the good in humanity despite the ugliness people can often show.
  7. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Atwood explores a world where women are stripped of their rights and forced into lives of slavery based on their skills and abilities, specifically following the story of Offred who has been selected to provide a baby for the infertile Commander and his wife.
  8. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak. This popular story of true love between man and woman is just one of the heart-stirring tales of fidelity and relationships in this classic.
  9. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Not only is this story a captivating tale of morals and society full of rich characters that has lived on for generations, the fact that Jane Austen was able to publish the book as a woman at the turn of the 19th century is remarkable.
  10. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. The gorgeous writing for which Woolf is so famous meshes beautifully with the theme of this story about finding and appreciating the beauty in life as the reader follows Mrs. Dalloway through one day of her life as she prepares for a party.
  11. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. Learn about the strength of a woman who can see the goodness of a man others cannot in this beloved tale.
  12. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck. This story chronicles the life of Chinese farmers Wang Lung and his wife O-lan and their devotion to each other and their family.
  13. Middlemarch by George Eliot. This classic book tells the story of a strong woman and an ambitious young doctor who live in a community full of richly-drawn characters.
  14. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. This epic of love and fidelity is a classic–don’t depend on the movie to truly know this story.

Children and Young Adult Literature

If you didn’t get a chance to read these as a child, or even if you did, put them on your list of inspirational and touching stories.

  1. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. This timeless tale of sisters who embrace their family despite hard times is a story to be appreciated by all women.
  2. Pippi Longstockings by Astrid Lindgren. Pippi is a little girl with a lot of pep. She stretches the truth and makes life seem fun even when faced with rules.
  3. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum. Talk about a leading lady, Dorothy guides this famous troop through Oz, stands up to the Wizard, and gets everyone what they need.
  4. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Where would Wilber be without the love and guidance of the nurturing spider, Charlotte? This classic tale of unconditional love will win your heart.
  5. Five Children and It by E. Nesbit. Five children who have recently moved from the city to the country discover a magical sand-fairy who grants their wishes each day. The misunderstanding of the wishes brings even more adventure.
  6. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson. Friendship and imagination lifts these two children out of their everyday lives, until tragedy strikes. This story is based on a real-life friendship between the author’s son and his friend, Lisa.
  7. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. This classic tale of adventure has Alice traveling through a topsy-turvy world where nothing is what it seems.
  8. Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell. The resourcefulness of the young Karana who is stranded on an island is inspirational for girls of all ages.
  9. Matilda by Roald Dahl. The spunky, precocious Matilda learns to use her special talents for good as she finds unconditional love with a special teacher in a story that is true to the imaginative writing style of Dahl.
  10. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O’Brien. A story of both community and technology vs. nature, this tale will surely make a place in your heart long after you’ve finished the book.
  11. Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingles Wilder. The story of Mrs. Wilder growing up in a time long past in the midst of a family full of love and the joy of life has made this book a classic enjoyed by many.
  12. Heidi by Johanna Spyri. Heidi’s sweet nature that wins over her grandfather’s heart will also win yours as you read about this vivacious young girl who creates a family full of love in the Alps.
  13. Aunt Maria by Diana Wynne Jones. After the death of their father, Mig and Chris are sent to live with Aunt Maria–but things aren’t what they seem there. Mig is the bold girl who braves the controlling aunt and her cronies and their magical powers.

Books Made into Movies

These books have all been made into movies, but be sure to read the books, too, for a more in-depth perspective that can’t always be portrayed on the big screen.

  1. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. Even if you want to discount this book because of the time travel aspect, don’t. This book is all about love, life, and making do with what the universe throws your way.
  2. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd. A young woman overcomes a traumatic childhood and finds love among the three women who take her in and teach her about family.
  3. Brick Lane by Monica Ali. A Bangladeshi woman moves to London to marry her husband in an arranged marriage. The story of Nazneen and her struggles to live a domesticated life beyond her control are paralleled with that of her sister, living as a social outcast back home.
  4. The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje. Ondaatje’s lyrical writing develops the characters of the novel and delivers them into an enchanting tale of love, loyalty, and war.
  5. Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe by Fannie Flagg. This book, some might say, has been overshadowed by the popularity of the movie, but don’t miss reading this one to really understand the relationships and adventure of these two friends.
  6. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. Enter the secret world of the geisha in pre-WWII Japan in this story that follows Sayuri as she grows up groomed to be a geisha and her life as a woman in a society ruled by men.
  7. Beloved by Toni Morrison. Follow the story of Sethe and her daughter Denver as they try to escape the haunting effects of slavery in this novel loosely based on the story of a real slave.
  8. Girl with the Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier. A young woman comes to the house of Dutch painter Vermeer and inadvertently becomes an inspiration for him.
  9. The Color Purple by Alice Walker. Celie learns to overcome her difficult life as a black woman in the south through a magnificent friendship that gives her the gift of inner strength.
  10. Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen. Karen Blixen, writing as Isak Dinesen, relates her life in colonial Nairobi where she falls in love the the land and the people who live there.
  11. The Constant Gardener by John le Carre. The story of Justin investigating his wife, Tessa’s murder and his revelations about their relationship and Tessa as a woman are beautiful and inspiring and are set against the backdrop of intrigue.

Books Featuring Familial Relationships

Parents, siblings, and daughters: these books all offer a look at the interactions that make or break a family.

  1. The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. A beautiful story of family secrets and quiet love, The Joy Luck Club tells the story of a young woman discovering the woman who was her mother.
  2. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver. Family relationships parallel the political climate of one corner of Africa in this powerful story.
  3. Midwives by Chris Bohjalian. Told from the perspectives of both the midwife’s journal and her daughter, this story tells of a family strained by an incident that is far from clear-cut to anyone involved.
  4. A Gesture Life by Chang-rae Lee. Franklin Hata struggles with his past as he attempts to reconcile with his daughter and forge a life more meaningful.
  5. The Memorykeeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards. A powerful secret creates and destroys families in this story of love conquering all.
  6. The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. This is a story of family and secrets, and how a sister and brother are affected throughout their lives.
  7. Splendor of Silence by Indu Sundaresan. Star-crossed lovers who face cultural differences lead this story about family, politics, and freedom.
  8. Away by Jane Urquhart. This lyrical Irish tale begins with a mystical love four generations earlier and finds great-granddaughter Esther searching for answers in her family history.
  9. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel. Tita must follow family tradition and is not allowed to marry her love in this enchanting and delicious story.

Books Celebrating the Strength of Women

While many of the books on this list celebrate the strength of women, these especially highlight how women can persevere through anything.

  1. Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood: A Novel by Rebecca Wells. Mothers, daughters, and friends are mixed and mingled in this story of sisterhood among the women in this novel.
  2. Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. Loosely based on a real village that isolated itself from the rest of the world during the plague, the heroine of the story loses much to the plague, yet perseveres in her attempt to save others.
  3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Jane Eyre is an independent woman with principles she stands by–despite living in an unenviable situation.
  4. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Battling depression, the protagonist in this story finds a way to fight for her happiness and come through on top.
  5. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorn. Hester bears the scorn of society as a result of a love affair, but she carries on and demonstrates a strength and humanity above that of her lover.
  6. Chocolat by Joanne Harris. Vianne and her daughter settle in to a small French village where they shake things up with their unconventional ways.
  7. Green Grass, Running Water by Thomas King. Get to know the female spirits that rule this Native American world and the human women who have a unique strength of their own in this book that will take you on a fun journey.
  8. Babette’s Feast by Isak Dinesen. The amazing Babette, who arrives unexpectedly in a remote village in Denmark, has amazing skills and a secret that, when revealed, shows her fortitude and adaptability.

Current Literature

These books offer some of the more recent offerings from the literary world that women will surely enjoy reading.

  1. The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani. This story of a 17th century young woman in Iran who, upon the death of her father, is forced into a new life–and one in which she discovers her autonomy through her skill as a rug maker.
  2. Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri. This beautiful collection of short stories highlights women and their relationships, with each story featuring a woman and her parents, husband, sibling, or lover.
  3. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory. Fidelity, infidelity, and political intrigue are the major themes of this story that tells the tale of King Henry VIII and the Boleyn family.
  4. The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery. Two women of different backgrounds and different generations both learn to find meaning in their lives in this captivating book.
  5. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen. This tale of a man joins the circus after he discovers his father’s veterinary business is going under is a beautifully written account of the animals and people in the circus–and based on research Gruen did from actual circuses.
  6. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson. This compelling mystery will reel you into the plot, but the characters (one of which is based on the author’s imagining who Pippi Longstocking would be as an adult) will keep you reading to the end.

Books about Finding Oneself

Coming of age is the major theme of these books that show young women struggling to find out who they are as adults.

  1. Bee Season by Myla Goldberg. A young girl who never stood out in life suddenly finds a hidden talent, and then stumbles upon a way to enhance that talent. As her family falls apart, she must make a choice that will affect how others perceive her.
  2. Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy. This true story documents Lucy’s battle against a rare form of cancer that leaves her face disfigured from an early age.
  3. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. A moving story, Middlesex starts with the family history that leads to the protagonist, Cal, living a life as a hermaphrodite.
  4. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende. A young woman leaves her life in Chile to travel to the US in search of her lover and finds herself along the way in this adventurous story.
  5. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. Despite loneliness and isolation, the characters in this book find a way to find push through.
  6. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. Offered in vignettes, this tale documents a young woman coming of age in the Latino district in Chicago.

Stories of Real Women

These biographies and autobiographies tell the story of amazing women, from Maya Angelou to Marie Antoinette to Amelia Earhart.

  1. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. This autobiographical story of Angelou’s life as a young girl growing up in a time of segregation.
  2. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein. Posed as an autobiography of Stein’s lover, Alice Toklas, this book is truly about the life of Stein herself.
  3. Florence Nightingale by Cecil Woodham-Smith. Florence Nightingale was a woman who made extraordinary changes for the field of nursing, bringing it from a disreputable job to the honorable one it is today.
  4. Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. While most people know who Anne Frank is, many have not had the pleasure of reading her journal documenting her family’s time in hiding from the Nazis. Do yourself a favor and read this one.
  5. The Story of My Life by Helen Keller. Read about the amazing accomplishments Helen Keller made over her lifetime in this truly inspirational book.
  6. Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America by Elliot J. Gorn. Learn about this powerful woman who organized and agitated for the sake of the American labor movement.
  7. Marie Antoinette: The Journey by Antonia Fraser. This book helps readers see beyond the public perceptions of Marie Antoinette and learn about the real woman.
  8. Personal History by Katharine Graham. From a childhood of privilege, Graham grew into a role of a powerful publisher of the Washington Post, but along the way faced a number of challenges.
  9. Amelia: A Life of the Aviation Legend by Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon. Find out about who Amelia Earhart really was–not just about her disappearance–in this biography.
  10. Portrait of an Artist: A Biography of Georgia O’Keeffe by Laurie Lisle. Learn about this amazing artist and woman who broke all the rules.

Non-Fiction

These non-fiction books have been written by women and provide insight on a range of topics that shouldn’t be missed.

  1. Fire in the Lake by Francis Fitzgerald. This interpretation of the Vietnam war is considered one of the best. Fitzgerald was a journalist in Vietnam, and she studied the culture at Yale prior to going there. Her experience and craft combine to make a powerful book.
  2. Pilgram at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard. Annie Dillard wrote about the nature of nature in this classic book.
  3. A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. Learn what Woolf has to say about why women write differently from men.
  4. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson. Carson’s popular book brought environmental justice to the American consciousness.
  5. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey. Detailing the establishment of a gorilla research center in Rwanda and fighting for conservation and against poaching are the bulk of this popular book published just two years before her murder in Rwanda.
  6. On Death and Dying by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. This book lead the way to reduce the fear and silence surrounding death in the medical community and remains an important work today.
  7. Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert. Learn how Gilbert found herself after one year of traveling to attain some of her life goals.
  8. Twenty Years at Hull-House,With Autobiographical Notes by Jane Addams. Addams started the first settlement house and worked tirelessly to provide for and educate the poor.
  9. The Language of the Night by Ursula K. Le Guin. Le Guin writes about writing in this masterful book that demonstrates why she stands as one of the most important writers of the 20th century.
  10. Is There No Place on Earth for Me? by Susan Sheehan. This book by a former New York Times investigative journalist won the Pulitzer Prize for its documentation of the plight of a woman called Sylvia Frumkin who suffered from schizophrenia and went in and out of the mental health system.
  11. Rescuing Sprite: A Dog Lover’s Story of Joy and Anguish by Mark Levin. This touching story is about the love a family can have for a dog, what the dog can bring to that family, and how to say goodbye.
  12. Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin. This true story of a man who has taken on the Taliban by building schools and providing education for girls.

Courtesy: http://www.sinlung.com

Read more: http://www.sinlung.com/lighter-side/art-theatre/101-books-every-woman-should-read.html#ixzz0XJicpRQP

Filed under: Book of the week,

New Arrivals (03/11/2009)

New Arrivals

(03/11/2009)

Call No.

Author

Title

001  O’B-D

 O’Brien, Derek

 Derek’s Picks: The best quizzes of Derek O’Brien

004.678  KIL-W

 Kilian, Crawford

 Writing for the Web

011  PEA-M

 Pearl, Nancy

 More book lust

028.9  SHA-B

 Shashi Tharoor

 Bookless in Baghdad

155.25  COV-E

 Covey, Stephen R

 Eighth habit: From effectiveness to greatness

155.25  YAG-S

 Yager, John

 Self motivation

181.4  KRI-C

 Krishnamurti, J

 Commentaries on living, Third series

291  RAD-E

 Radhakrishnan S

 Essays on religion, science & culture

300.1  AMA-I

 Amartya Sen

 Idea of justice

302  TAP-W

 Tapscott, Don, Williams, Anthony D.

 Wikinomics

303.4  ARU-L

 Arundhati Roy

 Listening to grasshoppers

303.44  DEV-B

 Devi Sridhar

 Battle against hunger: Choice, circumstances, and the world bank

303.44  NAN-I

 Nandan Nilekanki

 Imaging India: Ideas for the new century

303.44  NAR-B

 Narayanamurthy, N R

 Better india a better world

330.954  DHI-Q

 Dhillon, Surjeet R

 Question bank: Indian economy

338.5  AGA-M7

 Agarwal, H S

 Microeconomic theory

339  JHI-M

 Jhingan, M L

 Macro-economic theory

339  MIT-M

 Mithani, D M

 Macroeconomics

346  ALK-C

 Alka Chawla

 Copyright and related rights: National and international perspectives

355.450954  GUR-I

 Gurmeet Kanwal

 Indian Army Vision 2020

371.4  WAL-H2

 Walls, Susan

 How to get a job in television

420.7  PET-S

 Peterson, Jim

 Self help to english conversation

423.1  KHU-D

 Khurana, Shashi

 Dictionary of quotations

425  BOU-E

 Bourke, Kenna

 English verbs and tenses

425  HAN-A

 Hanif Kanjer

 All the right answers

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 4 (Class VII & VIII)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 3 (Class V & VI)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Jumbled letters: Marrs exercise book, Category 2 (Class III & IV)

425  MAR-J

 Marrs

 Identify the correct spelling exercise book, Category 1 (Class I & II)

425  NIL-P

 Nileena M.

 Picture crosswords

502  NAR-S

 Narlikar, Jayant V

 Scientific edge

510  MAN-M

 Manjeet Singh

 Mathematics, Class X

520  SIV-M

 Sivaram, C and Kenath Arun

 Modern  astronomy: Startling facts

650  AND-L

 Anderson, Chris

 Long tail: How endless choice is creating unlimited demand

650  HUF-H

 Huffmire, Donald W. and Holmes, Jane D.

 Handbook of effective management

658.4  ASH-E

 Asha Kaul

 Effective presentation

796.358  SHA-S

 Shashi Tharoor

 Shadows across the playing field

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Time to get up

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Time to get up

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Mystery of the buried treasure

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 In the garden

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 In the tent

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Down in the grass

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 At the zoo

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Rocket to the moon

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Mystery of the buried treasure

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Trouble with dinosaurs

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Jamuna

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Jamuna

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Big game

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Trouble with dinosaurs

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Playing with friends

808.068  BAR-J

 Barnett, Stephen

 Where are my socks

808.068  CHE-S

 Cheryl Rao

 Stories of Vikram and vetal

808.068  DAH-D

 Dahl, Roald

 Dirty Beasts

808.068  DAH-D

 Dahl, Roald

 Dirty Beasts

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: The secret of the unicorn

808.068  KAM-T

 Kamal Sharma, Abridged

 Tales of Panchatantra; Part V

808.068  PRA-W

 Pratiba Nath, Retold

 World of fantasy (Grimm’s Fairy Tales – 4)

808.068  PRA-W

 Pratiba Nath, Retold

 World of fantasy (Grimm’s Fairy Tales – 2)

808.068  PRA-W

 Pratiba Nath, Retold

 World of fantasy (Grimm’s Fairy Tales)

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Puss in boots

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Puss in boots

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Sleeping beauty

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Cinderella

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Cinderella

808.068  REA-C

 Reader’s World

 Puss in boots

808.068  REA-H

 Reader’s World

 Hansel and Gretel

808.068  REA-H

 Reader’s World

 Hansel and Gretel

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 3 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 4 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for life 5 (Aesop’s fables)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 3 (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 5

808.068  REA-L

 Reader’s World

 Learning for wisdom 3 (stories from Arabian nights)

808.068  ROH-F

 Rohan Books

 Fairy Tales: Snow White and the seven dwarfs

808.068  ROH-F

 Rohan Books

 Fairy Tales: Puss in boots

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-N

 Rohan Books

 Nursery rhymes 1

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Moral stories-The Miller’s son and the ass

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Snow white and the seven dwarfs

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Sleeping Beauty

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 World famous stories: Abu Hassan, The sleeper

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part IV

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part III

808.068  SHA-E

 Sharma, Kamal, Abri.

 Evergreen Tales of Panchatantra Part IV

808.068  SUP

 

 Super 100 activities

808.068  TWA-T

 Twain, Mark

 Tom Sawyer

821  CBS-B

 CBSE

 Book of english poems

821.08  AVA-P

 Avanti Maluste and Sudeep doshi, ed.

 Poem for cry: Favourite poems of famous Indians

823  ANA-T

 Ananda Pai, A

 Their longest night: based on sri valmiki ramayana

823  ANA-T

 Ananda Pai, A

 Their longest night: based on sri valmiki ramayana

823  BIB-M

 Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay

 Making a mango whisle

823  BLY-F

 Blyton, Enid

 Famous five: Five go off to camp, Five get into trouble, Five fall into adventure

823  BLY-F

 Blyton, Enid

 Famous five: Five run away together

823  BLY-G

 Blyton, Enid

 G0 ahead Secret seven

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Six o’ clock tales

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Secret seven mystery

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Secret seven win through

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Secret seven

823  BLY-T

 Blyton, Enid

 Three Cheers, Secret seven

823  BON-D

 Bond, Ruskin

 Delhi is not  far away: A novel

823  BRO-L

 Brown, Dan

 Lost symbol

823  CHA-A

 Chatterji, Bankim Chandra

 Anandamath

823  CHA-E

 Chatterjee, Upamanyu

 English, August: An Indian story

823  COE-W

 Coelho, Paulo

 Winner stands alone

823  COL-A

 Colfer, Eoin

 Airman

823  COL-A

 Colfer, Eoin

 Artemis Fowl

823  COL-A

 Colfer, Eoin

 Artemis Fowl and the time paradox

823  COL-S

 Colfer, Eoin

 Supernaturalist

823  COO-L

 Cooper, James Fenimore, Retold

 Last of the Mohicans

823  COO-W

 Coolidge, Susan

 What Katy did next

823  DAH-W

 Dahl, Roald

 Wonderful story of henry sugar and six more

823  DOY-V

 Doyle, Arthur Conan

 Valley of fear

823  HUG-L

 Hugo, Victor

 Les miserables

823  KIP-A

 Kipling, Rudyard

 Adventures of Mowgli

823  KUZ-L

 Kuzneski, Chris

 Lost throne

823  MEY-B

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Breaking dawn

823  MEY-E

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Eclipse

823  MEY-H

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Host

823  MEY-H

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Host

823  MEY-N

 Meyer, Stephenie

 New moon

823  MEY-T

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Twilight

823  MEY-T

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Twilight

823  MON-H

 Monica Pradhan

 Hindi bindi club

823  NAM-S

 Namita Gokhale

 Shakuntala: the play of memory

823  NAR-R

 Narayan, R K

 Ramayana

823  ORW-A

 Orwell, George

 Animal farm

823  PAM-W

 Pamuk, Orhan

 White Castle

823  PRE-M

 Preston, Douglas

 Monster of Florence

823  RON-W

 Rong, Jiang

 Wolf Totem

823  SAS-G

 Sashi Tharoor

 Great Indian novel

823  SAS-S

 Sashi Tharoor

 Show business: A novel

823  SAT-U

 Satyajit Ray

 Unicorn expedition and other stories

823  SHA-D

 Shashi Deshpande

 Dark holds no terrors: A novel

823  STE-T

 Stevenson, Robert Louis

 Treasure island

823  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Creature teacher

823  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Fright camp

823  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps:The werewolf in the living room

823  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: You’re pant food

823  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Escape from camp run for your life

823  VER-A

 Verne, Jules

 Around the world in eighty days

823  VIK-T

 Vikram Seth

 Two lives

823.01  MUL-S

 Mulkraj Anand

 Selected short stories

823.08  GOP-B

 Gopa Majumdar, Tr.

 Best of satyajit Ray

823.08  PAM-O

 Pamuk, Orhan

 Other Colours: essays and a story

825.08  RAB-L

 Rabindranath Tagore

 Lectures and addresses

826  JAW-L

 Jawaharlal Nehru

 Letters from a father to his daughter

827.08  BON-B

 Bond, Ruskin

 Book of humour

828  TAL-B

 Taleb, Nassim Nicholas

 Black swan: the impact of the highly improbable

920  PAD-K

 Padmanabhan, Anil

 Kalpana chawla: a life

921  MAK-S

 Makarand Paranjabe, Ed

 Swami Vivekananda Reader

923.173  KAU-B

 Kaushal Goyal and Hideya Nakamura

 Barack Obama: Dreams come true

923.20532  LUT-L

 Luther, Eric and Henken, Ted

 Life and work of Che Guevara

923.254  CHA-F

 Chandralekha Mehta

 Freedom’s child: Growing up during satyagraha

925  AMR-V

 Amrita Shah

 Vikram Sarabhai

927.96  DEV-S

 Devendra Prabhudesai

 SMG: A biography of Sunil Manohar Gavaskar

928.2  CHR-A

 Christie, Agatha

 Agatha Chrisie:  An Autobiography

R  330.03  BLA-D

 Black, John, Ed.

 Dictionary of economics

R  912  DK-C

 DK

 Concise atlas of the world: Digital mapping for the 21st century

T  294.3  MAN-S.08

 Manik Govind Chaturvedi

 Samshipt budhacharith: Class 8 (h)

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S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com