Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

Where Minds meet and Ideas pop up !

New Arrivals (as on 30 Nov. 2010)

NEW ARRIVALS

(As on 30 November 2010)

CALL No

Author

Title

001  CHI-A

 Chitra Shastri

 All-rounder quiz book.1

001  SUJ-L

 Sujata Ray

 Literature quiz

001.076  RAM-N

 Ramasamy E S

 N.D.A. (National Defence Academy) Examinatiion

004.678  CRY-T

 Crystal, David

 Txtng

303.44  NIL-I

 Nilekani, Nandan

 Imagining India: ideas for the new century

303.66  STO-S

 Stohl, Rachel, et al

 Small arms trade

339  JHI-M

 Jhingan. M L

 Macroeconomic Theory

363.34  MOD-C

 Modh, Sathish

 Citizen’s guide ti disaster management: How to save your own life and help others

370.15  GRI-H

 Griffiths, Alex and Stephenson, Pauline

 Hundred and one essential lists on managing behaviour in the secondary school

370.78  CAL-G2

 Cale, Lorraine and Harris, Jo

 Getting the students fit

370.78  FAR-G2

 Farmery, Christine

 Getting the students into science

371.26  RAY-H

 Rayment, Tabatha

 Hundred and one essential lists on assignment

371.39  ARC-H

 Archer, Sharon

 Hundred ideas for teaching science

371.39  ARC-H

 Archer, Sharon

 Hundred ideas for primary supply teachers

371.39  BOW-H

 Bowkett, Stephen

 Hundred ideas for teaching creativity

371.39  COL-H

 Cole, George

 Hundred and one essential lists for using ICT in the classroom

371.39  COO-H

 Cooze, Angella

 Hundred ideas for teaching english

371.39  COW-G

 Cowley, Sue

 Getting the students be creative

371.39  COW-G

 Cowlex, Sue

 Gurilla guide to teaching

371.39  COW-G2

 Cowley, Sue

 Getting the students to think

371.39  DAV-H

 Davies, Ian

 Hundred ideas for teaching citizenship

371.39  MUR-H

 Murphy, Julia

 Hundred ideas for teaching history

371.39  OLL-H

 Ollerton, Mike

 Hundred ideas for teaching mathematics

371.39  RAI-T

 Rainu Gupta

 Teaching of commerce

371.4  WAL-H

 Walls, Susan

 How to get a job in television

421  CON-O

 Condrill, Jo and Bough, Bennie

 One hundred one ways to improve your communication skills instantly

421  DHA-E

 Dhanavel, S.P.

 English and soft skills

422  TRU-E

 Truss, Lynne

 Eats, shoots & leaves

425  GRA

 

 Graded English grammar, 8

4H5  MIS-A

 Misra, Mahendra Kumar

 Aavo vardhni sudharem (h)

523.1  LIF

 Dartnell, lewis

 Life in the universe

576.5072  LEV-C

 Levine, Aaron D.

 Cloning: A beginners guide

576.8  GUT-E

 Guttman, Burton S.

 Evolution: A beginner’s guide

577  SPI-B

 Spicer, John I.

 Biodiversity: A beginner’s guide

581  MOO-A

 Moore, Jo Ellen

 All about plants

660.6  CBS-T

 CBSE

 Text book of Biotechnology, Class XI

660.6  CBS-T

 CBSE

 Laboratory manual of of Biotechnology, Class XI

660.6  CBS-T

 CBSE

 Text book of Biotechnology, Class XI

660.6  CBS-T

 CBSE

 Laboratory manual of of Biotechnology, Class XI

660.6  CBS-T

 CBSE

 Text book of Biotechnology, Class XI

660.6  DUB-B

 Dubey, R.C

 Biotechnology with biotechnology practicals for class XII

702  NOR-F

 Norris, Jill

 Folk Art Projects

793.732  KAR-C

 Karuna Jha

 Crossword for everyone

793.732  KAR-C

 Karuna Jha

 Crossword for everyone

808.068  AJE-S

 Ajeya Row

 Unusual halloween & other adventures

808.068  AJE-S

 Ajeya Row

 Saving the old oak! & other adventures

808.068  DEE-M

 Deepika

 Me and my family

808.068  DIC-B

 Dickens, Charles

 Bleak house

808.068  DIC-D

 Dickens, Charles

 David Coperfield

808.068  DIC-G

 Dickens, Charles

 Grat expectations

808.068  DIC-G

 Dickens, Charles

 Christmas Carol

808.068  DUM-M

 Dumas, Alexandre

 Man in the iron mask

808.068  FAF-Y

 Fafa-Juno

 young ones’ yoga

808.068  FAM

 

 Famous tales of Tenali Raman

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the genie

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the mixed-up monster

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the demons

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the phoenix

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the royal tomb

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the big stinker

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi

808.068  FIL-G

 Filipek, Nina

 Goldilocks and the three bears

808.068  FIL-P

 Filipek, Nina

 Playing together – on the farm

808.068  FIL-T

 Filipek, Nina

 Three little pigs

808.068  FUN

 

 Fun with colour

808.068  GRI-G

 Grimm

 Grimm’s fairy tales

808.068  HAG-K

 Haggard, H Rider

 King Solomon’s mines

808.068  IND-S

 Indiana

 Sleeping beauty and other stories

808.068  KAM-T

 Kamal Sharma

 Tales of Panchtantra – 4

808.068  KAM-T

 Kamal Sharma

 Tales of Panchtantra – 5

808.068  KAM-T

 Kamal Sharma

 Tales of Panchtantra – 5

808.068  KAM-T

 Kamal Sharma

 Tales of Panchtantra – 4

808.068  KAV-W

 Kavita krishnamurthy

 Where is the missing wheat? & other stories

808.068  KAV-W

 Kavita krishnamurthy

 Walk away shoes & other stories

808.068  KAV-W

 Kavita krishnamurthy

 Where is the missing wheat? & other stories

808.068  KAV-W

 Kavita krishnamurthy

 Where is the missing wheat? & other stories

808.068  KOH-B

 Kohli K S

 Brownie Bean’s Christmas day

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Enormous turnip

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Enormous turnip

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Little red hen

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Sorcerer’s apprentice

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Brave little tailor

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Brave little tailor

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Brave little tailor

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Brave little tailor

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Three little pigs

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Thumbelina

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Three little pigs

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Enormous turnip

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Chicken licken

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Chicken licken

808.068  KOH-E

 Kohli, K S

 Thumbelina

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Goose girl

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Goose girl

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Elves and the shoemaker

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Princess and the frog

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Princess and the frog

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Elves and the shoemaker

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Gingerbread boy

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Princess and the pea

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Princess and the pea

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Gingerbread boy

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Gingerbread boy

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Elves and the shoemaker

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Elves and the shoemaker

808.068  KOH-G

 Kohli, K S

 Good Samaritan: Famous stories from the Bible

808.068  KOH-O

 Kohli, K S

 Old woman and her pig

808.068  KOH-O

 Kohli, K S

 Old woman and her pig

808.068  KOH-O

 Kohli, K S

 Old woman and her pig

808.068  KOH-O

 Kohli, K S

 Old woman and her pig

808.068  KOH-O

 kohli K S

 Our lovely pets

808.068  KOH-O

 Sukhjit Singh

 Little kittens

808.068  KOH-S

 kohli K S

 Sing along

808.068  KOH-S

 Kohli, K S

 Snow  white and the seven dwarfs

808.068  KOH-S

 Kohli, K S

 Sly fox and the little red hen

808.068  KOH-S

 Kohli, K S

 Snow  white and the seven dwarfs

808.068  KOH-W

 kohli K S

 World famous stories Vol. 5

808.068  KRI

 

 Krishna……..aaya natkhat nandlal: activity book

808.068  LIE-W

 Liela Seth

 We, the children of India:The preamble to our constitution

808.068  MEG-A

 Meghaa Shah

 At the happyville hospital & other adventures

808.068  OSB-M

 Osborne, Mary Pope

 Magic tree house: Dolphins at daybreak

808.068  OSB-M

 Osborne, Mary Pope

 Magic tree house, 20: Dingoes at dinnertime

808.068  OSB-M

 Osborne, Mary Pope

 Magic tree house, 16: Hour of the Olympics

808.068  PRA-L

 Pratibha Nath

 Learning for wisdom – 3

808.068  PRA-L

 Pratibha Nath

 Learning for life: Aesop’s fables – 3

808.068  PRA-L

 Pratibha Nath

 Learning for life: Aesop’s fables

808.068  PRA-L

 Pratibha Nath

 Learning for wisdom – 3

808.068  PRA-L

 Pratibha Nath

 Learning for life: Aesop’s fables

808.068  PRA-W

 Pratibha Nath

 World of fantasy(Grimm’s fairy tales)

808.068  PRA-W

 Pratibha Nath

 World of fantasy(Grimm’s fairy tales)

808.068  PRO-B

 Prole, Helen

 Busy bee…games

808.068  PRO-B

 Prole, Helen

 Busy bee…Learning

808.068  RAJ-B

 Rajiv,Compiler

 Best loved stories from Panchatantra 1

808.068  ROH-A

 Rohan Books

 Adventures of Kala Naag

808.068  ROH-B

 Rohan’s Books

 Birbal saves the day

808.068  ROH-M

 Rohan Books

 Moral stories for children

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 Wisdom of Vikram

808.068  ROH-W

 Rohan Books

 Wise Vikram and crafty Betal

808.068  SAN-G

 Santhini Govindan

 Great treasure hunt & the talking tree

808.068  SAN-G

 Santhini Govindan

 Grumpy Juno misses the fun & all for a peaceful nap

808.068  SAN-G

 Santhini Govindan

 Good night juno & Juno’s snuggly day

808.068  SAN-G

 Santhini Govindan

 Great treasure hunt & the talking tree

808.068  SAN-S

 Santhini Govindan

 Secret that slipped out & making something interesting happen

808.068  SAN-S

 Santhini Govindan

 Secret that slipped out & making something interesting happen

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa

 Children’s treasury of fairy tales – 3

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 1

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 2

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 3

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 4

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 4

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 5

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa Books

 Children’s treasury of fairy tales – 3

808.068  SHI-C

 Shilpa publishing

 Children’s treasury of Panchtantra stories 1

808.068  SHI-P

 Shilpa publishing

 Panchtantra ki kahaniyam (h)

808.068  SNI-S

 Snigdha Sah

 Science experiments with heat

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: My hairiest adventure

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: The blob that ate everyone

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: How I learned to fly

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Calling all creeps !

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Welcome to horrorland, a survival guide

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: The haunted mask

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Piano lessonscan be murder

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Monster blood II

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: The ghost next door

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Toy terror, batteries included

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: The curse of creeping coffin

808.068  STI-G

 Stine, R L

 Goosebumps: Vampire breath

808.068  SUK-A

 Sukhjit Singh

 Alphabet and number book

808.068  SUK-F

 Sukhjit Singh

 Five Minute Tales Volume II

808.068  SUK-F

 Sukhjit Singh

 Five Minute Tales Volume II

808.068  SUK-J

 Sukhjit Singh

 Jack the giant killer

808.068  SUK-W

 Sukhjit Singh

 Wizard’s needle

808.068  SUK-W

 Sukhjit Singh

 Wonderful world of lovable

823  ALC-L

 Alcott, Louisa May

 Little women

823  ANA-S

 Anand Mahadevan

 Strike

823  BLA-L

 Blackmore, R D

 Lorna Doone

823  BLY-S

 Blyton, Enid

 Sea of adventure

823  CAB-A

 Cabot, Meg

 Allie Finkle’s rules for girls

823  CHA-W

 Chang, Jung

 Wild swans: Three daughters of China

823  CHI-P

 Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

 Palace of illusions

823  DAH-B

 Dahl, Roald

 Best of Roald Dahl

823  DIX-H

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Hardy Boys

823  IBB-B

 Ibbotson, Eva

 Beasts of clawstone castle

823  KAH-C

 Kahlil Gibran

 Complete works of Kahlil Gibran

823  KHY-H

 Khyrunnisa, A.

 Howzzat butterfingers

823  LAK-P

 Lakshmi Devnath

 Poorva: Magic, miracles and the mystical twelve

823  PAR-W

 paro Anand

 Weed

823  ROO-T

 Roopa Pai

 Taranauts: The quest for the shyn emeralds

823  SAJ-S

 Sajita Nair

 She’s a jolly good fellow

823  SAR-B

 Saramago, Jose

 Blindness

823  SAR-D

 Saramoago, Jose

 Death at intervals

823  STI-W

 Stine, R.L.

 Werewolf in the living room

823  TWA-A

 Twain, Mark

 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

823  TWA-P

 Twain, Mark

 Pri nce and the pauper

823  VER-J

 Verne, Jules

 Journey to the centre of the earth

823  VER-R

 Verne, Jules

 Round the world in eighty days

823.01  CLE

 

 Clear blue sky: Stories and poems on conflict and hope

823.01  KOT-L

 Kottarathil Shankunni

 Lore and legends of Kerala: Aithihyamala

823.01  PUF-P

 Puffin

 Puffin book of spooky ghost stories

823.01  SEL-C

 Sell, Colleen, Ed.

 Cup of comfort for parents of children with special needs

823.01  SEL-C

 Sell, Colleen, Ed.

 Cup of comfort for teachers

823.01  SEL-C

 Sell, Colleen, Ed.

 Cup of comfort for friends

823.01  SEL-C

 Sell, Colleen, Ed.

 Cup of comfort for mothers and daughters

823.01  TOW-C

 Townsend, Susan B., Ed.

 Cup of comfort Big book of prayer

8H1  AJA-V

 Ajay Singhal

 Vaibhav-padh (h)

8H1  JOS-M

 Joshi, Bhola Datt

 Man ke geet

8H1  KAM-D

 Kamal ‘Sathyarthi’

 Dhoop-Jhang (Geet-sangrah0 (h)

8H1  MAN-B

 Manika Verma

 Boojho To Janey (paheliyan) (h)

8H1  PRE-S

 Premkishore, ‘Patakha’ and Ashok Anjum

 Shreshtha hasya-vyangya geet (h)

8H1  RAJ-H

 Rajkumar Sachan

 Ham sab bache banem mahan (h)

8H1  RIS-S

 Risha Sood

 Shalvika (h)

8H1  TAG-G

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Geetanjali(h)

8H1  VER-S

 Verma, Shambhunath

 Sukhi Jivan Jine ki kala (h)

8H2  CHA-K

 Chauhan,Lalbahadur Singh

 Khoob Lari Mardani Weh To….(h)

8H2  KAK-S

 Kaka Hatharasi; Giriraj Sharan

 Shreshta hasya-vyangya ekanki (h)

8H2  VER-H

 Verma, Ram Gopal

 Hasys-vyangya rang ekanki (A comedy drama) (h)

8H3  GUP-M

 Gupta, Shanti swarup

 Marathi ki pratinidhi hasya kahaniyan (h)

8H3  MAN-E

 Manu, Prakash

 Ekyavan bal kahaniyan (h)

8H3  MIS-P

 Mishra, Bhagwati Sharan

 Pratham purush (h)

8H3  MUK-M

 Mukesh Nadan

 Mulla Nasruddin ke kisse

8H3  RAK-B

 Rakesh Chakra

 Bachchon Ki Manoranjank Kahaniya  (h)

8H3  SAR-P

 Saral, Manmohan & Shri Krishnan

 Pratinidhi Hasys kahaniyan (h)

8H3  SHA-J

 Sharma, Ganga Prasad

 Jatak Kathayem

8H3  SHA-L.4

 Sharma, Manu

 Lakshagrah (Krishna ki Atmakatha Vol.IV) (h)

8H3  SHA-N

 Sharma, Manu

 Narad ki Bhavishyavani (Krishna ki Atmakatha Vol.1) (h)

8H3  SHA-T

 Sharma, Ganga Prashad

 Tenaliram ke Manoranjak Kissey (h)

8H3  SIN-S

 Singh, Rajbahadur

 Sundar kahaniyan (h)

8H3.08  GEE-B

 Geetika Goyal

 Birbal ki Manoranjak kahaniyan (h)

8H3.08  KAM-S

 Kamaleswar

 Solah Chathom ka ghar (Kahani sangrah) (h)

8H3.08  SAN-G

 Sanjeev

 Gali ke mot pe suna-sa koye darvajha (kahani-sangrah) (h)

8H3.08  SUR-N

 Surekha Bhargav

 Natkhad kahaniyam (h) bhag 5

8H3.08  SUR-N

 Surekha Bhargav

 Natkhad kahaniyam (h) bhag 4

8H3.08  SUR-N

 Surekha Bhargav

 Natkhad kahaniyam (h) bhag 3

8H3.08  SUR-N

 Surekha Bhargav

 Natkhad kahaniyam (h) bhag 2

8H3.08  SUR-N

 Surekha Bhargav

 Natkhad kahaniyam (h) bhag 1

8H4  MAH-D

 Mahesh, Ishan

 Dhani dharthi (h)

8H4  PUR-L

 Puri, Manohar

 Loktantra ke paye (h)

8H4  SED-A

 Sed, Indu Prabha

 Aur neki geeth gayi

8H4  SHA-P

 Sharan, Giriraj, ed.

 Police vyavastha par vyangya

8H4  SHA-P

 Sharan, Giriraj, ed.

 Parivarik Jeevan ke vyangya

8H4  SHA-S

 Sharan, Giriraj, ed.

 Samajik  vyavastha par vyangya

8H4  SHA-S

 Sharan, Giriraj, ed.

 Shiksha vyavastha par vyangya

8H4  SIN-L

 Singhvi L M

 Loktantra ki vidambana

8H4  TIK-M

 Tikaram, Parveen Prisila

 Man suganth(h)

8H4  VYA-S

 Vyas, Harichandra

 Siksha ki samskriti(h)

8H5  MIS-B

 Misra, Bharatendu

 Balayogi ashtavakra (Bal upanyas) (h)

8H7  HAT-S

 Hatharasi, Kaka and Sharan, Giriraj, ed.

 shreshtha hasya-vyangya kahaniyan (h)

8H7  SHA-B

 Shastri, Prithwonath and Lalla, Yogendra Kumar

 Bangla ki Prathinidhi Hasya Kahaniyan(Representative Humorous stories of Bangla) (h)

8H8  BHA-A

 Bhatnagar, Rajendra Mohan

 Anthim Sathyagrahi(h)

8H8  GEE-A

 Geetika Goyal

 Aao seekein gyan ki baetein (h)

8H8  HEM-I

 Hemant

 Is des mein jo Ganga Bahati Hai (h)

8H8  JOS-B

 Joshi, Bhola Datt

 Basad Mothi (h)

8H8  MIS-N

 Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

 Nobel puraskar se samanit vishav ki mahilayein (h)

8H8  OJH-U

 Ojha, D D

 Upagrahon ka rochak sansar (h)

8H8  PRE-D

 Prem, Ramesh Chandra

 Desh-videsh ki vichitra prathayen (h)

8H8  RIS-S

 Risha Sood

 Samchothana(h)

8H8  SAN-T

 Sankruthyayan, Rahul

 Tibet mem sava baras (h)

8H8  SEN-B

 Sengar, Shailendra

 Bharat gyan kosh : Bharatiya Sanskriti Evem Arthvyavastha Vol. 3 (h)

8H8  SHA-A

 Shankar, Kali & Shukla, Rakesh

 Antriksha ke rochak abhiyan

8H8  SHA-N

 Sharma, Pavitra Kumar

 Nari kabhi na Hari (h)

8H8  SHA-S

 Sharma, Pavitra Kumar

 Shiksha kaisi ho (h)

8H8  SUR-3

 Surti, Abid

 365 chutkule (h)

920  SIN-F

 Singh, Joginder

 Flying high with broken wings

920.02  GAG-N

 Gagan Jain

 Nobel prize winners for peace

920.02  GAG-N4

 Gagan Jain

 Nobel prize winners in chemistry

920.02  GAG-N4

 Gagan Jain

 Nobel prize winners in medicine

920.02  GAG-N4

 Gagan Jain

 Nobel prize winners in literature

920.02  GAG-N4

 Gagan Jain

 Nobel prize winners in physics

920.054  KEL-S

 Keller, Helen

 Story of my life

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.9

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.1

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.2

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.11

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.4

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.5

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.8

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.10

920.054  REM

 

 Remembering our leaders, Vol.7

923.144  LUD-N

 Ludwig, Emil

 Napoleon

923.154  JAW-J

 Jawaharlal Nehru

 Jawaharlal Nehru: The jewel of India

923.15491  BHU-B

 Bhutto, Benazir

 Benazir Bhuto: Daughter of the east, an autobiography

923.15491  BHU-S

 Bhutto, Fatima

 Songs of blood and sword: A daughter’s memoir

923.168  MER-B

 Meredith, Martin

 Biography of Mandela

923.273  X, -A

 X, Malcolm

 Autobiography of Malcolm  X

927.8  YES-M

 Yesudas, K.J.

 My life and my thoughts

927.91437  GOU-A

 Goutamam Bhaskaran

 Adoor Gopalakrishnan: A life in cinema

927.96  BUR-M

 Burns, Jimmy

 Maradona: The hand of God

927.96  CAI-M

 Caioli, Luca

 Messi: The inside story of a boy who became a legend

928  MOR-W

 Morais, Fernando

 Warrior’s life: A biography of Paulo Coelho

928  WIL-G

 Williams, L.F. Rushbrook

 Great authors and poet’s of India

928.1  MUL-A

 Mullin, Rita Thievon

 Ann Frank: Hidden hope

928.L

 Martin, Gerald

 Gabriel Garcia marquez: A life

944  DAV-F

 Davies, Peter

 French revolution: A beginners guide

954  SAR-S

 Sarkar, Jadunath

 Short history of Aurangazib

9H2   NAD-B

 Nadan, Mukesh

 Bharat ke veer balak(h)

H  004  SHA-I

 Sharma, Prahlad

 Internet aur pusthakalaya

H 004.03  SHA-C

 Sharma, Prahlad

 Computer sabdakosh(h)

H 507  USH-S

 Usha Taylor

 Science projects(h)

H 808.068  AGR-G

 Agrawal, Ankith

 Geetopdes ki kahaniyam (h)

H 808.068  AGR-G

 Agrawal, Ankith

 Geetopdes ki kahaniyam (h)

H 808.068  AGR-G

 Agrawal, Ankith

 Geetopdes ki kahaniyam (h)

H 808.068  AGR-P

 Agraval, Ankith

 Panchatantra ki kahaniyam(h)

H 808.068  JAT-J

 Jat, Nanuram

 Jal prapath (h)

H 808.068  MAN-H

 Manohar Prabhakar

 Hamare Thyohar(h)

H 808.068  MAN-J

 Maneesha Sharma

 Jatak kathayem(h)

H 808.068  MAN-N

 Manohar Varma

 Nani ki ghir(h)

H 808.068  PUS-A

 Pushpa Agrawal

 Aa Bile mujhe mar (h)

H 808.068  PUS-P

 Pushpa Agrawal

 Pathith-pavani Ganga (h)

H 808.068  PUS-P

 Pushpa Agrawal

 Pathith-pavani Ganga (h)

H 808.068  PUS-P

 Pushpa Agrawal

 Pathith-pavani Ganga (h)

H 808.068  RAC-P

 Rachana Goswami

 Paryavaran samasya aur samadhan (h)

H 808.068  RAC-P

 Rachana Goswami

 Paryavaran samasya aur samadhan (h)

H 808.068  RAJ-P

 Rajaneesh

 Paani bachavo (h)

H 808.068  RAJ-P

 Rajaneesh

 Paani bachavo (h)

H 808.068  RIT-J

 Rithupriya

 Jal samrakshan (h)

H 808.068  SEE-P

 Seema Sharma

 Polio rog(h)

H 808.068  SEE-P

 Seema Sharma

 Polio rog(h)

H 808.068  SUD-R

 Sudha Puri

 Rangoli Geethmala (h) bhag 2

H 808.068  SUD-R

 Sudha Puri

 Rangoli Geethmala (h) bhag 1

H 8H8  AMS-R

 Amsari, M A

 Rashtriya mahilaaayog aur bharatiya nari (h)

R  001  ASK

 Ferris, Julie, Ed

 Ask me anything

R  901.9  OVE-C

 Overy, Richard

 Complete history of the world

R  912  COL-C

 Collins

 Concise atlas of the world

R 001  SAN-K

 Sandvold, Lynnette Bret, Yamini and Perritano

 Knowledge encyclopedia

R 821.08  SIL-C

 Silberg, Jackie and Schiller, Pam

 Complete book of rhymes, songs,poems, fingerplays and chants

T  420.7  NCE-M.04.4

 NCERT

 Marigold, Book4: Textbook in English for class IV

T  420.7  SHA-L.03

 NCERT

 Learning English: Textbook for class III

T  420.7  SHA-L.03

 NCERT

 Learning English: Workbook for class III

T  420.7  SHA-L.05

 Shabnam Sinha, Ed.

 Learning English: A textbook for class V

T  4H0.7  PRA-B.08.3

 Pramodkumar Dubey, Ed.

 Bharathi, Bhag3: Kaksha 8 keliye Hindi ki padyapusthak (h)

T  530  NCE-P

 NCERT

 Physics Part I Textbook for Class XI

T  570  NCE-B.12

 NCERT

 Biology: Textbook for class XII

T 510  NCE-M.11

 NCERT

 Mathematics Textbook for Class XI

Filed under: New Book Alert

Inter School Literary Quiz: Winners

IMG_2059

IMG_2060

IMG_2061

National Library Week 2010

Inter School Literary Quiz Competition

27/11/2010

 

S.No.

Position

Name, Class & Div.

School

01

I

Salini Johnson, XII A

Neema K.Saji, IX C

KV Pattom

Shift-I

02

II

Aravind M.R., IX B

Ashita Vijay, VIII A

KV Pattom

Shift-II

Filed under: Winners of library competitions,

Meet the Poet@ your Library: Gireesh Puliyoor

clip_image002

 

clip_image003

 

 

 

 

At 11.15 a.m.

on 02 December 2010

in The Library

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Filed under: Library activities,

Book Jacket designing Contest: Winning entries

 IMG_2073 IMG_2076

 IMG_2077 IMG_2078

 IMG_2066  IMG_2068

 IMG_2071 IMG_2076

 IMG_2079 IMG_2080

IMG_2081 IMG_2069

 IMG_2070  IMG_2074

IMG_2075

Competition held in connection with the National Library Week 2010 on 26/11/2010

Filed under: Library activities,

Excessive Video Gaming Can Lead to Problematic Teen Behavior, Study Says

By Lauren Barack November 23, 2010

Playing video games excessively can lead to problematic behavior, especially for high school boys, says a new study from Yale University’s School of Medicine published in the current issue of Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Problematic gamers are defined as those who report trying to cut back or who have an overpowering need to play, as well as those who feel tension that can only be relieved by playing, the study says.

videogames(Original Import)However, researchers noted that problematic gaming instances were low for librarians and teachers incorporating educational video games into the classroom curriculum.

Nearly 5 percent of teens who consider themselves gamers reported an "irresistible urge to play," along with stress that only disappeared after they started playing, with 5.8 percent of boys falling into this category compared to just 3 percent of girls.

"The prevalence of problematic gaming is low but not insignificant, and problematic gaming may be contained within a larger spectrum of externalizing behaviors," says the article, "Video-Gaming Among High School Students: Health Correlates, Gender Differences, and Problematic Gaming." The report concludes that "more research is needed to define safe levels of gaming, refine the definition of problematic gaming, and evaluate effective prevention and intervention strategies."

The study comes just as the U.S. Supreme Court continues to mull a California law that’s being challenged over whether children should be banned from purchasing violent video games.

While the Yale University study doesn’t differentiate between the types of video games teens play, violent or otherwise, it does note that playing these games can become excessive.

Researchers anonymously surveyed 4,028 children, with 51.2 percent saying they play video games, and about 14 percent admitting to playing an average of three hours or more a day. The study’s authors noted that the number could even be higher since gamers often lose track of the amount of time they spend playing. Researchers also found associations between excessive gaming and "smoking, drug use, aggressive behavior and depression," they wrote.

Gaming is not likely to disappear from today’s culture. And the authors note that "given their popularity among youth," gaming requires a closer look at how it can continue without behavior problems developing.

 

Courtesy: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com

Filed under: Snippets

Book jacket Designing Contest

In connection with the National Library week 2010, a book jacket designing competition was held in the Library on 26/11/2010.

 IMG_2053

 IMG_2055

 IMG_2056

IMG_2058

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IMG_2050

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Filed under: Library activities

Book Review Writing Competition: Winners

National Library Week 2010

25 Nov. – 02 Dec.2010
Book review writing competition held on 25/11/2010
 

Results

Shift-I

S.No.

Group

Position

Name, Class & Div.

01

VI-VIII

I

Nithyasree VI D

02

II

Anjana S., VIII D

03

III

Jini S., VIII D

04

IX-XII

I

Salini Johnson, XII A

05

II

Neema K.Saji, IX C

06

III

Amritha G., X D

07

III

Mahima Unnikrishnan, X B

Shift-II

 Held on 23/11/2010

Juniors (Classes VI & VII)

Sl. No.

Name of students

 Class & division

      Result

 1

Varun. G

     VI  A

        I

 2

Rohin. R

      VI A

       II

 3

Nandana Suresh

     VII A

      III

 

Seniors (Classes VIII-X)

Sl. No.

Name of students

  Class & division

 Result

 1

Rahul Chandra

       IX  B

      I

 2

Serene Sidhique

       IX  A   

     II

 3

Arun Kumar S S

        X  A

    III

 

Filed under: Winners of library competitions

Meeting Readers Where They Are: Mapping the intersection of research and practice

By Carol Gordon

The reading patterns and habits of young and old are changing as reading migrates from the printed page to the computer screen. Now, new forms of expression such as remixes and mash-ups are emerging from interactive digital environments. How can school librarians help students read with understanding in dynamic digital environments? How can they anticipate the help young people need to successfully negotiate new forms of reading?

Examining current reading practices—and the underlying research-based beliefs that may or may not guide those practices—can not only help us improve our work today, but it can also help us create future practices. But are our current practices working? Some of our beliefs are mythical, while others are based on research. How can we tell the difference? Below are the seven most prevalent beliefs about reading examined in the light of previous research.

slj1110_gordon2(Original Import)

Illustration by Ken Orvidas

1. Young people get better at reading by reading, just as they learn by doing (Shin, 1998; Dewey, 1916).

Do we provide enough reading opportunities? For decades school librarians have assumed the role of reading motivator, arranging author visits, distributing bookmarks, delivering booktalks, creating reading lists and READposters. A statewide study of school libraries showed that most reading activities sponsored by school libraries are passive, rather than active (Todd and Heinstrom, 2006).

While passive activities create interest in reading, and possibly motivation, they are more effective when balanced with active reading through sustained silent reading. Those who participate in sustained silent reading programs show clear increases in the amount of free reading they do outside of school (Pilgreen and Krashen, 1993), and the effects appear to last years after the program ends (Greaney and Clarke, 1975). Despite these findings, sustained silent reading has declined in schools. Book clubs and summer reading programs also offer time to read, but they are extracurricular. They motivate reading because they create reading communities that extend reading into a social activity.

2. The social aspects associated with reading are motivational (Guthrie and Wigfield, 1997).

School librarians can reduce the isolation of reading through reading blogs, reading clubs, literature circles, and student reviews reported in podcasts and Voice Thread. These activities give reading a voice, making the experience of reading communal. Social networking tools are useful in bringing readers together, yet in many schools web 2.0 sites are blocked, cutting students off from the virtual worlds in which they spend a good deal of their time.

Even summer reading programs are rarely collaborative. There’s little opportunity for teens to connect reading with social interaction among their teachers, librarians, or peers. Reading in isolation is compounded by reading mandates that dictate texts that are simply not interesting to adolescents. Often the closest that reading comes to being a social activity is through competition rather than cooperation (Guthrie and Davis, 2003). Reading motivation programs that use competition and artificial measures of reading success, such as point systems, distort the reason for reading. They rob students of free choice by shifting the focus from what they want or like to read to what will earn them more points.

3. Free choice is a factor in reading motivation (Guthrie and Davis, 2003).

Do young people believe they have free choice? The decline in motivation of middle school students is accompanied by a decline in choices and an increase in teacher control (Guthrie and Davis, 2003). Studies of summer reading in Massachusetts (Gordon and Lu, 2008) and Delaware (unpublished) show that low-achieving students don’t think they have free choice, while their higher-achieving classmates feel they do. Since low achievers typically do not read voluntarily outside of school, most of their reading is mandated. These students express anger and defiance, as indicated by survey data. In many cases, low achievers don’t really hate to read—they hate to be told what to read.

Free choice is violated when schools give preference to books, especially for low achievers, and fail to validate alternative media such as magazines, newspapers, and websites (Gordon and Lu, 2008). Summer reading programs typically present graded lists that narrow choice to “recommended” books. The focus on reading books turns off reluctant readers who say they hate to read, but actually do read during the summer (ibid). Although they read alternative materials, they don’t think this kind of reading counts. Instead of encouraging students to read what they’re already enjoying, schools demotivate them by limiting their reading choices. Preferring books over other sources of reading not only fails to validate low achievers as readers, it invites low levels of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977). “Self efficacy refers to beliefs a person has about his or her capabilities to learn or perform behaviors at designated levels” (Schunk and Zimmerman, 1997). Low achievers begin to believe that they cannot read.

4. Free voluntary reading is as effective, or more effective, than direct instruction (Greaney, 1970; Krashen, 1989).

Free voluntary reading (FVR) is not only conducive to reading motivation, it actually works better than direct instruction. Fifty-one out of 54 students using FVR did as well or better on reading tests than students given traditional skill-based reading instruction (Krashen, 2004). In fact, young people who read have better comprehension, research tells us, and they write better, spell better, improve their grammar, and increase their vocabulary.

For example, one study (Saragi, Nation, and Meister, 1978) presented adult readers with copies of Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, a novel that contains 241 words of an artificial language called nadsat. Each artificial word is repeated an average of 15 times. In the study, the nadsat dictionary was removed from the books and readers were told they would be tested when they finished reading, but they didn’t know their vocabulary acquisition would be tested. They finished their books within three days and a few days later were given a multiple choice test covering 90 nadsat words. Scores ranged from 50 to 96 percent, with an average of 76 percent.

There’s also evidence that FVR benefits English-language learners as well. In three studies of 3,000 children, ages six through nine, children following a program that combined shared book experience, language experience, and free reading outperformed traditionally taught students on tests of reading comprehension, vocabulary, oral language, grammar, listening, and writing (Elley and Mangubhai, 1983).

5. People will read when they have access to reading materials (Krashen, 2004).

Access is the silver bullet for reading improvement. Krashen (2004) argues that there’s consistent evidence that those who have more access to books read more. Students who have more time for recreational reading demonstrate more academic gains in reading than “comparison students.” A lack of reading practice results in a decline in reading ability.

In Colombia, the government dramatically increased access to reading materials. Fundalectura, a government agency charged with promoting reading implemented a program called I Libri al Viento, or Books to the Wind. The country was flooded with inexpensive reprints of out-of-copyright novels, short stories, and poetry. Books were placed at bus stops, train stations, and markets—wherever there were people. As people read more, literacy rates improved.

6. It is important to design inclusive summer reading for all students (Gordon and Lu, 2008).

The “summer effect” on student achievement is well-researched: “The long summer vacation breaks the rhythm of instruction, leads to forgetting, and requires a significant amount of review when students return to school in the fall” (Cooper, 2003). Research findings have consistently reported that student learning declines or remains the same during the summer months and the magnitude of the change differs based on socioeconomic status (Malach and Rutter, 2003).

Family income emerged as the best predictor of loss in reading comprehension and word recognition loss (Cooper et al. 1996). Disadvantaged children showed the greatest losses, with a loss of three months of grade-level equivalency during the summer months each year, compared with an average of one month loss by middle-income children when reading and math performance are combined (Alexander and Entwisle, 1996). The difference between high- and low-income children’s reading scores on the California Achievement Test, as a percent of the standard deviation of scores, grew from 68 percent in first grade, to 98 percent in third grade, to 114 percent in eighth grade.

During the school year, learners’ gains are remarkably similar for students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds (Entwistle, Alexander, and Olson, 1997, 2000; Heyns, 1978; Murnane, 1975). However, when school is not in session during the summer, there are inequalities in educational opportunities and outcomes (Alexander, Entwisle, and Olson 2001; Cooper et al. 1996). Children with special educational needs (Sargent and Fidler, 1987) or those who speak a language other than English at home may experience a greater negative effect from an extended period without practice. It can be said that the achievement gap is a summer reading gap.

While summer reading is a good idea, it often violates research-based beliefs about free choice, the importance of access, and the social aspects of reading. Teacher- and librarian-authored reading lists often don’t include student input. The classics are emphasized, and choices are limited to books. There is no attention paid to reading across nonprint media formats, i.e., transliteracy. Despite what the research shows us, many educators insist that summer reading should be curricular and students should read “good” books.

Although research shows that stimulating tasks increase situational interest, which in turn increases reading motivation and comprehension (Guthrie, et al. 2006), summer reading programs often lack stimulating tasks. Instead, students are asked to write a report about what they read. Situational reading, or interest in a particular book at a particular time, requires intervention in the form of reading advisory that’s often absent during the summer months. Writing about what they read is not, for most students, a stimulating task that captures the excitement of situational reading. In fact, for reluctant and struggling readers, who are also reluctant and struggling writers, it’s punitive.

7. The pleasure hypothesis—reading is its own reward (Krashen, 2004).

Summer reading and other reading motivation initiatives are problematic when they offer extrinsic rewards for reading. Intrinsic motivation is found to be a predictor of the amount and breadth of reading more often than extrinsic motivation (Guthrie and Wigfield, 1997). Many reading initiatives use extrinsic motivation by offering points for reading or a grade for “book reports” or summaries presented to the English/ language arts teacher when students return to school after summer vacation. For aliterate and reluctant readers this translates to extrinsic punishment for not doing the written assignment, usually because they didn’t read books.

Extrinsic rewards, often combined with competition, suggest that young people are resistant to reading. This is, for the most part, not true when we broaden our view of what it means to read. Meeting readers where they are, rather than expecting them to meet us where we think they should be, is critical to reading motivation. In fact, it’s a key concept in opening doors to reading for adolescents because it’s related to self-efficacy. Reading is its own reward because it’s enjoyable—even for low achievers and reluctant readers. Reading is described as “perhaps the most often mentioned flow activity in the world” (Csikszentmihalyi, 1991).

What do successful reading motivation strategies have in common with why tweens and teens like being online? Whether teens are reading a book or blogging, they like interactive, hands-on experiences. They thrive on social interaction and inclusiveness. They are self-directed learners who know free choice is part of being creative. Teens expect access to books and computers. School librarians aren’t trapped by institutionalized beliefs about reading. Rather, school librarians are empowered to promote reading, not as a school subject that’s mandated, practiced, and tested, but as a personal experience that fulfills intellectual and emotional needs.

Carol Gordon (carol.gordon@rutgers.edu) is an associate professor in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University, and director of research for the Center for International Studies in School Libraries.

Courtesy: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com

Filed under: Article of the Week,

Do you know where your personal information is?

It’s time to take charge of our digital identity

By Christopher Harris — School Library Journal, 01/01/2010

It’s 2010. Do you know where your personal information is? Unless you rang in the New Year from some off-the-grid cave, much of your digital identity is out there floating freely around the Net. Going online requires a careful balancing act, in which users must weigh both privacy and participation, caution and convenience. Luckily, there are tools to help you.

The first step is gaining some understanding of privacy issues in the digital age. Sure, there’s a lot of fearmongering, but at the same time, don’t be naive about the realities of living a connected lifestyle. Your mobile phone, for instance, has GPS location services that track your every move. Sprint received more than eight million requests for location information from law enforcement in a year, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation. EFF has joined a lawsuit against the government in an effort to gain more information about how social networking data is being used. One major concern is the different level of protection enjoyed by a physical diary one keeps in a bedroom versus an online journal maintained on a blog or social network profile.

To help inform the public about digital privacy, the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom has launched a new Web site,PrivacyRevolution.org. Proudly declaring “I am not an open book” on its front page, the new site offers privacy-related news, as well as related tips and tools for libraries and patrons. The site is still evolving, but, already has a great selection of videos and content from “privacy allies,” such as author and blogger Cory Doctorow and the Freedom to Read Foundation. Then there’s Choose Privacy Week (May 2–8, 2010)—take advantage of the planning tools on PrivacyRevolution and get involved.

You can also take responsibility for your digital identity on a more personal level. As online citizens begin to demand more control of their privacy, technology companies are responding. Google recently announced a new service called Dashboard. The tool displays all of your personal information that Google holds across its many applications. So from one site, I can easily manage my two Google calendars, 13 profile entries, 387 contacts, and 10,238 email conversations. While the new service is a solid step forward, even more important is Google’s assertion that when you delete something from its services, the content is, in fact, gone (to the extent that something can generally be considered deleted; forensic analysis of a hard drive will reveal traces of data).

So how do we make 2010 the year we take back our privacy? An essential step—and our biggest challenge—will be education. We have to find the right tone for discussing privacy with students. Lecture too severely and we risk alienating a population that we know is going to be online anyway. Engendering fear won’t work either; yet students must understand the consequences of poor digital choices.

From social network profiles that share too much information to the moe potential for harm posed by sexting, privacy is the next frontier of our explorations online.


Author Information

Christopher Harris (infomancy@gmail.com) is coordinator of the school library system of the Genesee Valley (NY) BOCES.

Courtesy: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com

Filed under: Online safety Tips,

National Library Week 2010

clip_image002

Contest

Who can participate?

Date & Time

Venue

Details

Book Review writing competition

Class

VI-VIII

IX-XII

25/11/2010

10.30 a.m.

Library

Write a review on your favourite fantasy books

(Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl, Eragon, Eldest, Twilight, etc)

Book jacket designing competition

Class

VI-VIII

IX-XII

26/11/2010

10/30 a.m.

Library

Design a jacket for Twilight/Artemis Fowl book

Inter School Literary Quiz (Preliminary)

VI-XII

(Two teams will be selected)

27/11/2010

10.30 a.m.

Library

Quiz on Books, Writers, Awards and events

Inter School Literary Quiz (Final)

VI-XII

29/11/2010

10.30 a.m.

Library

Quiz on Books, Writers, Awards and events

Register your names at the Library.

Filed under: Library activities,

Archives

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Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8004 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

Population Stabilization in India Toll Free Helpline

Dial 1800-11-6555 for expert advice on reproductive, maternal and child health; adolescent and sexual health; and family planning.

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com