Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

Where Minds meet and Ideas pop up !

“Don’t be addicted to Net”: Dr.George Onakkoor

The internet should supplement student’s reading and an addiction to it will hamper their physical and mental development, said Dr. George Onakkoor. The technology should support the acquisition of knowledge which will later be transformed into wisdom. The students should represent the diverse cultures of the country  and at the same time be proud to be an Indian, he said.

Onakkoor was attending the “Meet the Author” session organized by the Library Media Centre of Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom. He interacted with the children and also distributed the prizes to the winners of various competitions held in the library.

IMG_2612

 IMG_2614

IMG_2589

 IMG_2591

 IMG_2592

 IMG_2593

IMG_2594

IMG_2611

 IMG_2595

IMG_2596

 IMG_2597

 IMG_2598

 IMG_2599

IMG_2600

 IMG_2601

 IMG_2602

IMG_2604

 IMG_2605

IMG_2606

IMG_2607

 IMG_2608

IMG_2609

IMG_2610 

 DSC09961

DSC09962

DSC09963

DSC09964

DSC09965

DSC09966

DSC09967

DSC09968

DSC09969

DSC09970

DSC09971

DSC09972

DSC09973

 DSC09974

 DSC09975

DSC09976

DSC09977

DSC09978

 DSC09979

DSC09980

 DSC09981

DSC09982

 DSC09984

 DSC09985

DSC09986

DSC09987

 DSC09988

DSC09989

DSC09990

DSC09994

DSC09995

DSC09996

DSC09997

 DSC09998

DSC09999

DSC00001

Filed under: Library activities, Reader's Club, , , , , ,

Breeze through your exams

 

As exams draw near, both parents and students experience rising stress levels. Here are a few tips that will help you stay tension-free in this most stressful period.

As the exam countdown begins, students start experiencing stress, in many cases rising to alarming levels. Stress can manifest as headaches, stomach pain, vomiting, dysentery and even dizziness. Students with a previous history of (or vulnerable to) epilepsy can develop a seizure and those with migraine can develop migraine headaches due to severe stress.

Stress can also manifest as poor concentration, memory, attention, calculation and comprehension. Stress can affect their mood: this can make them cry, get irritable or angry or very unpleasant. A simple request to study can lead to a ruckus; losing many hours in the emotional outburst and spoiling moods for the rest of the day, if not a week! Students can experience stress due to academic and non-academic issues: preparation for the exams, confidence vs. self-doubt, pressure from people around, restrictions by parents and most importantly performance in the exams.

What you should do

A comprehensive preparation with multiple revisions is vital for outstanding performance. It may not be a good idea to study in the last minute for such major exams; but if someone is in such a situation then it could be prudent to study selectively depending on the time available, than to exhaust oneself with the entire portion.

The effect of good preparation is high confidence levels. The reverse is also true. Many students, despite preparing well, will report poor confidence levels. Such students must develop a habit of basing their judgment on a test, results of model exams or ability to recite answers. Arbitrarily developing opinions about how well they have studied can have an adverse effect on their confidence and consequently performance.

Some teachers have infamous ways of motivating students: they give lower marks than the student deserves, the logic being the student only then will not develop overconfidence and continue to study well. It would be better to have a realistic self-evaluation based on their past performance and present efforts.

Tips for parents

Parents, teachers, siblings, friends, relatives, neighbours, visitors and even casual acquaintances advise the students on the need to score high marks. The overall focus is to make the student score as much as possible; preferably above 95 per cent, being oblivious to both the capacity and previous performances! If a student is already stressed out, these external pressures can become overwhelming. This can affect the student’s motivation and ability to study, so do not over-advise children on the need to study.

If a student is found not studying during the exams, what they require is not elaborate advice but assistance and supervision. A parent or sibling may have to be physically present, give them selected portion to study within a time period and then make them write the answers after 24 hours, which will show if they have retained what they learnt.

Some parents do not allow their children to have adequate sleep; they expect them to wake up in the early hours and study. The student is more likely to waste time sleeping over an open book than learning constructively. Without sufficient rest, the brain’s learning centres will not be activated. So a lot of time will be spent learning very little. If a student goes without sufficient sleep, there is a high risk of going totally blank in the examination hall.

Allot time carefully

Parents impose restrictions on television, telephones, movies, friends, social network sites. Allotting time for study and recreation is a better idea than totally denying. Frame a schedule and see it is kept. This will enable the child to maintain time discipline and also know that during his study time he would be better off studying.

Exams are held to evaluate the knowledge of the students in various subjects. Depending on their ability to score marks they will be eligible for various opportunities. However high or low the marks are there are plenty of opportunities in this world for everyone. It is very important to be aware that exams are not a life and death situation. Scoring little less or failing does not mean the end; a few compromises need to be made to move on in life.

Sit, Relax, Write and Enjoy

Sit: Get seated comfortably. Organise your pen, pencil, marker, eraser etc.

Relax: Read through the question paper a couple of times; understand the question clearly. Do not worry about knowing or not knowing the answers.

Write: As the answers come to your mind, even if you do not remember everything, you can put together an answer based on your knowledge.

Enjoy: Writing an exam is a life time event, enjoy every moment of it. Naturally the best in you will come out.

Useful techniques

Preparation: Read and understand, memorise, recall by writing a self-test after 24 hours, read the missing points and then revise repeatedly.

Mood: Do not wait to get into a mood to study, build it up by focussing on how much you want to score and how much you need to study.

Confidence: Have an objective way of developing confidence.

Sleep: Very important to sleep well to feel fresh to study and to write the exams.

Memory: Do not check your memory by arbitrarily recalling some answer. With model tests, class tests and revisions it is unlikely you will forget everything.

Coping with stress

Identify stressful situations and develop strategies to overcome it.

Encourage yourself; do not look for encouragement from outside. Say to yourself ‘I can recall all that I read’, ‘I will do very well in the exams’ and ‘I can score high marks’.

Utilise study time to study and avoid unnecessary conflicts with parents.

Do not think of study as drudgery or be tense, enjoy the preparation process and challenges of taking the exam.

By Ravi Samuel

The writer is a Chennai-based Cognitive Psychotherapist. Email:rsam_67@yahoo.co.uk

Courtesy: The Hindu

Filed under: Snippets,

Meet the Author: Dr. George Onakkoor

Meet  the famous Malayalam writer Dr. Geoge Onakkoor at 11.00 a.m. on 26 February 2011 in the Library.

 

Dr. George Onakkoor

George Onakkoor is a famous malayalam novelist born on 16 November 1941, at Moovattupuzha, in northern Travancore. Malayalam professor for over three decades at Mar Ivanios College, Trivandrum, Kerala.

Dr. George Onakkoor is well acknowledged in various capacities as novelist, short-storywriter, critic, script and travel writer. He was the former Director of Kerala State Institute of Children’s Literature, State Institute of Encyclopaedic Publications and Kerala State Literacy Council. He also served as the first Non-official Chairman of the State Resource Centre.

The awards he received include The Jawaharlal Nehru Award for his excellent service as Chief Editor of the Children’s Encyclopaedia; the award for the best research thesis submitted in Indian Universities in the field of Art and Literature, the Kesava Dev Centenary Memorial Award, Thakazhi Sahithya Award, Mother Theresa Award, KCBC Award, Kerala Shree Award, Kesava Dev Award etc. He has been honoured by the Government of Kerala for his contributions to Language and Literature. The Award for the outstanding Indian writer given by the Euro-American Expatriate Literary Association was yet another laurels he received. The Kerala Sahithya Academy Award has been conferred on Dr. George Onakkoor twice for his novel (Illam in 1980) and travelogue (Adarunna Akaasham).

Some of his writings are: Akale Akasham, Uzhavuchalukal, Ulkkadal, Illam, Kalthamara, Kamana, Ezhuthapurangal, Samathalangalkkappuram, Hridayathiloru Vaal, Parvathangalile Kaattu (Novels), Orchid, The Sword in the Soul, The Wind in the Mountains (Translations of his three novels)etc.

Publications, Literary

Literary Critic and Novelist Author of Thirty One books

1. Akale Akasam (Novel)- 1972 2. Ulkkadal (Novel)- 1975 3. Kalthamara (Novel)- 1977 4. Ezhuthappurangal (Novel)- 1978 5. Illam (Novel)- 1979 6. Kamana (Novel)- 1981 7. Kamana (Novel, English Edition)- 1981 8. Uzhavuchalukal (Novel)- 1985 9. Nalu Poochakkuttikal (Stories)- 1985 10. Njan Kathirikkunnu (Novel)- 1986 11. Njan Oru Kaioppu Matram (Stories)- 1988 12. Rachanayude Rahasyam (Children’s Literature)- 1989 13. Thapovanathile Sooryan (Children’s Literature)- 1989 14. Olivumarangalude Nattil (Travelogue)- 1989 15. Marubhumiyude Hridayam Thedi (Travelogue)- 1990 16. Maria Goretti (Children’s Literature)- 1991 17. Mahatma Gandhi (Biography)- 1994 18. M. P. Paul, Kalapathinte Thiruseshippukal (Biography)- 1994 19. Nadu Neengunna Neram (Stories)- 1995 20. Samathalangalkkappuram (Novel)- 1996 21. Arshajnanathinte Pravachakan (Biography)- 1999 22. Samaya Soochikal Nischalam (Stories)- 2005 23. Hrudayathil Oru Wal (Novel)- 2005 24. Kuttikalude Sampoorna Bible (Children’s Literature)- 2007 25. Parvathangalile Kattu -2007 (Based on the life on Mrs. Indira Gandhi) 26. Pranaya Kathakal -2009

Publications, Academic

27. Kerala Bhasha Ganga (Literary Criticism)- 1963 28. Yuga Prathibha (Literary Criticism)- 1963 29. Sahitya Sameepanam (Literary Criticism)- 1968 30. Ithihasa Pushpangal (Literary Criticism)- 1969 31. Nayakasankalpam Malayala Novelil (Thesis)- 1986

Cinema

• Contributed, Story, Screenplay and Dialogue for nine feature films in Malayalam: 1. Aradhana 2. Ente Neelakasam 3. Leyam 4. Katha Parayum Kayal 5. Johny 6. Kaithappoo 7. Ulkkadal 8. Kilikonchal 9. Yamanam • Contributed Script for Twelve Documentary films. • The Film ‘Ulkkadal’ won number of Awards in 1979. • The Film ‘Yamanam’ won the Indira Gandhi Award for the best thematic content.

Awards

  • The novel ‘illam’ won the Kerala Sahitya Academy Award in 1980 for the Best Novel written during the period from 1977 to 1979.
  • The novel ‘Kamana’ won the Mar Ivanios Cultural Award in 1984.
  • The Ph.D. thesis ‘Nayakasankalpam Malayala Novelil’ won the first K.M. George Sapthathi Award for the best thesis produced in Indian Universities in Language, Literature and Culture during the period from 1980 to 1985.
  • The Film Critics Award for the Best Story Writer in 1991; Film ‘Yamanam’ based on the novel ‘Kamana’.
  • The film ‘Yamanam’ won the National Award for the Best Social Theme in 1992.
  • Honoured with Jawaharlal Nehru Award, instituted by the Mathrubhumi Study Circle, for the outstanding contributions to Children’s Literature in 1993.
  • ‘Akale Akasam’ and ‘Illam’ were prescribed as textbooks for the Degree Examinations of the University of Kerala.
  • ‘Orchid’—the translation of the novel ‘Kalthamara’—was prescribed as a textbook in the Clerk Atlanta University, Georgia, U.S.A.
  • ‘M. P. Paul: Kalapathinte Thiruseshippukal’ won the Sahodaran Ayyappan Award for the best Biography in 1996.
  • The biography ‘Arshajnanathinte Pravachakan’ won the Delhi Malankara Association Bi-Decennial Literary Award in 1999.
  • Darsana Award for the outstanding contribution to the field of culture in 2000.
  • Milan Award (Michigan Malayalee Literary Association of North America Award) for the unique contribution in Art, Literature and Culture in 2002.
  • Kesava Dev Birth Centenary Award for the total contribution to the Malayalam Novel in 2003.
  • The travelogue “Adarunna Akasam” won the Kerala Sahitya Academy Award in 2005.
  • First Euro-American Pravasi Award for the outstanding Indian Writer in 2005.
  • ‘STATE HONOUR’ by the Govt. of Kerala for the Distinguished Contributions to the Language & Literature (2005).
  • The Novel ‘Hrudayathil Oru Wal’ won the K.C.B.C. Award , the prestigious Thakazhi Award and Kerala Sree Award(2006).
  • Kesava Dev Award for the Novel ‘Parvathangalile Kattu’ in 2009.

Administrative Experience

  • Chairman, State Resource Centre, Kerala: 3 years
  • Director, The State Institute of Encyclopaedic Publications: 2 years
  • Director, The Kerala Saksharatha Samithi: 2 years
  • Director, The State Institute of Children’s Literature: 5 years
  • Head of the Department of Malayalam, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram: 29 years
  • Member, Director Board & Executive Committee of Sahitya Pravarthaka Cooperative Society, Kottayam: 3 years
  • Member, Managing Committee, Kerala Sahitya Academy: 2 years
  • Member, Managing Committee, ‘Thonnackal Asan Smarakam’:3 years
  • President, Kerala Film Critics Association: 4 years

Positions in Academic, Cultural Bodies

  • Member of the Kerala Sahitya Academy General Council and Finance Committee from 1974 to 1977 and from 1981 to 1984 and member of the Managing Committee from 1984 to 1986.
  • Member of the Kerala University Senate from 1984 to 1988 (Government nominee representing the authors).
  • Member of the Business Advisory Committee of the Kerala University Senate from 1984 to 1988.
  • Member of the Board of Studies in Malayalam, Gandhiji University, Kottayam from 1984 to 1987.
  • Member of the Board of Studies in Malayalam, University of Kerala from 1984 to 1990.
  • Member of the Advisory Board of the Correspondence Course, University of Kerala from 1977 to 1981.
  • Member of the Advisory Board, Department of Publications, University of Kerala from 1985 to 1988.
  • Member of the Director Board and Executive Committee of the Sahitya Pravarthaka Co-operative Society from 1980 to 1983.
  • Member of the Advisory Panel of the Regional Film Censor Board from 1984 to 1989.
  • Member of the ‘Thonnackal Asan Smarakam’ from 1985 to 1988.
  • Member of the School Syllabus Reforms Committee in 1983.
  • Member of the School Library Committee from 1983 to 1988.
  • Member of the Thiruvananthapuram Public Library Committee from 1982 to 1986.
  • Member of the Media Committee, Kerala Saksharatha Samithi from 1991 to 1993.
  • Member of the National Executive of Encyclopaedia Makers.
  • Member of the Language Advisory Committee of the Encyclopaedic Publications, Govt. of Kerala.
  • Member of the Judging Committee for State Award, Professional Dramas.
  • Chairman of the State Award Committee for the Best Book on Cinema.
  • Member of the Selection Committee for Sponsored Programs, Doordarshan.
  • Member of Language Committee, Bharatiya Jnanapith Award.
  • Member of the Script Selection Committee of the National Film Development Corporation.
  • Member of the Book Selection Committee, Operation Black Board Scheme.
  • Member of Kerala State Pre-primary Education Advisory Board.
  • Member of the Kerala State Curriculum Committee.
  • Member of the Swadeshabhimani Memorial Trust.
  • Vice-President of the Indo-Ukrainian Friendship Society, Kerala Chapter.
  • Vice-President of the C. Achutha Menon Foundation, Thiruvananthapuram Chapter.
  • Expert Member of the Official Language Commission, Govt. of Kerala.
  • Member of the Raja Ram Mohun Roy Library Foundation of India.
  • Member of the Programme Advisory Committee, Prasar Bharathi.
  • Chairman of the Publication Committee, Sahitya Pravarthaka Co-operative Society.
  • Member of the Senate – CUSAT (Cochin University of Science & Technology ) 2007 –
  • (Nominated by the Chancellor of the University – Governor – State of Kerala, representing the authors).
  • President of the C.V. Raman Pillai National Foundation

 

CONTACT

‘Sudarsana,’ Nalanchira

Thiruvananthapuram 695 015

Kerala, India

Tel: +91 471 2531135

Mobile: +91 94475 21162

Email: georgeonakkoor@rediffmail.com

Filed under: Library activities,

Ask the CBSE about Class X and XII Exams

I am a Class X CBSE student from Tamil Nadu. The system followed here to allocate seats for professional (both medical/engineering) colleges favours the students passing through the State board syllabus. The State board students find it comparatively easier to get the colleges of their choice compared to CBSE students. Is there any pattern for levelling of scores obtained in CBSE exams with the State board?

Anisha

You may like to address this question to the State Board concerned.

In Class XII English, for the question on report and article writing (10 marks each), should we limit our answer to the given count of words or can we exceed it? How are the marks given?

Sadana A.C.

Try to restrict your answer within the word limit denoted in the question paper. However, if you exceed the word limit, you will not be penalised.

Report and article will be evaluated as per the scheme given below:

Format: Title, Reporter’s /Writer’s name 1 mark; Content 4 marks; Expression 5 marks; Grammatical accuracy, appropriate words and spelling 2 and 1/2 marks; Coherence and relevance of ideas and style 2 and 1/2 marks

My daughter is a Class IX CBSE student intending to switch over to State higher secondary course for Class XI. Please advise: a) Whether she has to appear for the CBSE Class X exam to get the transfer certificate?

Transfer certificate can be obtained whenever a student wishes to move out of the school. However, clearing Class X examination is the basic requirement for admission to Class XI.

b) If so, should she register for the CBSE X exam 2012 before March 2011?

Philips Varkey

A student has to attend classes regularly for appearing in Class X CBSE board examination and registration for the examination is done through the school during the academic session which will begin on 1.2.2011.

What will be the percentage of HOTS questions in the Summative Test-II in Science? What about the skill test in subjects where question papers already contain multiple-choice questions on practicals?

Bhagirathi Behera, HoD Science, Shantiniketan Vidyalaya, Shamirpet, Hyderabad

In the question paper of Summative Examination no clear-cut demarcation for HOTS question have been made.

But in general, the question paper would have 15 per cent of the questions of higher difficulty level. Also 16 questions in the question paper of 80 marks will be practical skill-based MCQs and rest of the 25 questions will be based on theory.

I am in Class X. I have opted for school-based Summative Assessment II. Is Percentile Rank calculated at the school level or national (board) level? Is it calculated on the basis of grade point or actual mark?

Nikhil, MES School, Kuttippuram, Kerala

No percentile rank will be given in the grade sheet and the school-based assessment certificate to be issued by the Board.

Last year, in Kerala, the CBSE results were published after the State examination results were declared and the students from the CBSE board who wanted to migrate to the State stream could not do so. Will this be addressed this year?

P. Venugopalan

CBSE is making its earnest efforts to declare the results of the Summative Examinations II at the earliest possible time.

However for your information, the Chennai Regional Office of the Board is one of the first regional offices to declare its results.

The Class X certificate is considered an important document for the purpose of further education, employment, etc. But with the Board having made the Class X board examination optional, will the Class XII certificate be enough for such purposes?

P. Vijai Kanth

The School-based Evaluation Certificate will be issued by the Board only to all the students irrespective of their appearing for Summative Examination II conducted by the School or by the Board.

I am a Class X student. According to the new CCE system, if a student wants to continue in the CBSE stream and does not write the Board exams, which is more important for him — Class XII or Class X?

Vijai Kanth

For the students, Class X is as important as Class XII. Class X gives the base for senior secondary and Class XII for higher education.

My son Aman VP applied for Class XII examination (2011) as a private candidate (for improvement) on September 18, 2010. We have not yet received the Admit Card. Please inform me regarding despatch of Admit Cards to private candidates or the status of the Application Form No. 381.

Veerankutty

Please contact the CBSE Regional Office concerned with the details for obtaining the Admit Card for the examination.

I am in Class X and have opted for the School-conducted exam. Do I still have the option of moving out of the school and seek admission in another school?

NGR Srikanth

Even those students who have opted for School-Conducted summative assessment can move out of the school and seek admission in the school of their choice based on their performance reflected in the school- based assessment certificate and the admission policy of the school.

My ward is writing the school-based exam for Class X. Is it possible to change to the State-board stream for Class XI?

Murali

As the certificate at the end of Class X is going to be issued by the CBSE, there should not be any problem for you in getting admission in Class XI, as there is equivalence between Class X of different Boards.

However as per the Scheme, a child should opt for the Board-Conducted examination, if he wishes to move out of CBSE system after Class X.

I am in Class X. I have opted for the Board-conducted exam. Can I continue in the same institution next year?

Karthik A.S.

The school may admit students to Class XI in the subjects offered as per the merit of the students and its admission policy.

I am in Class X. I have opted for the internal exam. Can I opt for other State boards for Class XI?

Pavan Shankar

Any student who has cleared Class X in CBSE can seek admission for Class XI of any other recognised Board as there is equivalence between Class X of different Boards. However as per the Scheme, a child should opt for the Board-Conducted examination, if he wishes to move out of the CBSE system after Class X.

I am a Class XII Commerce student appearing for Board exam this March. For Business Studies and Accountancy, which book do I need to refer to and which chapters do I need to revise thoroughly. For practising, which of the following should I prefer — CBSE Sample Papers or previous year’s Board exam papers? How many points do I need to write for the following categories of questions — 1 mark, 3 marks, 4 marks, 5 / 6 marks?

Seshan

The Class XII Board Examination will be based on the syllabus prescribed by the Board.

The CBSE has recommended NCERT textbooks for Business Studies and Accountancy, but you can supplement and enrich your answers by using inputs provided in other standard books available in the market.

Please refer to the syllabus in Business Studies and Accountancy prescribed by the Board which also indicates weightage of marks assigned to different Units of the syllabus.

You can use the Board’s Sample Question Papers and last few years’ question papers for your preparation and practice.

Generally the questions specify the number of points to be given in the answer. However, some long answer questions are also assessed as a whole.

Hence you must read the question thoroughly to decide the type of answer to be written.

Filed under: Ask the CBSE, , ,

Anant Pai (Uncle Pai)

The creator of ‘Indian comics’ and founder of Amar Chitra Katha on which generations of Indians grew up.

Anant Pai, (17 September 1929 – 24 February 2011) popularly known as Uncle Pai, was a renowned educationalist and creator of Indian comics, in particular the Amar Chitra Kathaseries in 1967, along with the India Book House publishers, and which retold traditional Indian folk tales, mythological stories, and biographies of historical characters. In 1980, he launchedTinkle, a children’s anthology, which was started under Rang Rekha Features, India’s first comic and cartoon syndicate, that lasted till 1998, with him as the Managing Director

Anant Pai suffered a massive heart attack and passed away on 24th Februay 2011 at 5 pm.

Today, Amar Chitra Katha, sells about three million comic books a year, in English and more than 20 Indian languages, and has sold about 100 million copies since it inception in 1967 by Anant Pai, and in 2007 was taken over by ACK Media.

Early life and education

Born in Karkala, Karnataka to Venkataraya and Susheela Pai, he lost his parents at the age of two. At the age of twelve, he came to Mumbai, where he studied in Orient School, Mahim. He studied chemistry, physics and chemical technology at the University of Bombay Department of Chemical Technology (UDCT now UICT) and was a dual degree holder from the University of Bombay.

Early career

Endowed with a passion for publishing and comics, his failed attempt at creating a children’s magazine (Manav, 1954) was followed by a career as a junior executive in the Times of India books division, putting him in the thick of affairs when Indrajal comics was launched by the Times Group.

The Amar Chitra Katha years

The idea behind starting a comicbook series devoted to Indian culture and history came to Pai from a quiz contest aired on Doordarshan in February 1967, in which participants could easily answer questions pertaining to Greek mythology, but were unable to reply to the question "In the Ramayana, who was Rama’s mother?".

He left his job and started Amar Chitra Katha the same year, with the help of late G. L. Mirchandani of India Book House, when most other publishers from Allied Publishers to Jaico had rejected the concept. Later, he took on the role of writer, editor and publisher. The series went on to become a publishing milestone for the Indian comic book scene, selling over 86 million copies of about 440 titles.

In 1969, Anant Pai founded Rang Rekha Features, India’s first comic and cartoon syndicate, and started the children’s magazine Tinkle in 1980. His involvement with the above, and the rapport he shared with his readers earned him the title "Uncle Pai".

Other works

Ramu and Shamu, Kapish, Little Raji, Rekha, Fact Fantasy, Funland and Funtime are some of the comic strips created by Pai, most of which continue to appear in newspapers and magazines. He has written and produced two video films, Ekam Sat (the Vedic Concept of God) and The Secret of Success, in English and Hindi.

Pai’s other works include a number of books on personality development for children and teenagers, ("How To Develop Self-confidence", "How to Achieve Success", "How To Develop A Super Memory", UBS Publishers) and a series of audio book versions of Amar Chitra Kathastories, "Storytime with Uncle Pai" (Universal Music India, Dec 2001), where he plays the role of narrator-storyteller.

Awards

  • Lifetime Achievement Award – at the First Indian Comic Convention, New Delhi (Feb 19, 2011 – just 6 days before his death) was given to him by Pran, Creator of Chacha Chaudhury
  • Karpoorchand Puraskar of Uttar Pradesh Bal Kalyan Sansthan (1994)
  • Yudhvir Memorial Award in Hyderabad (1996)
  • Maharashtra Rajya Hindi Sahitya Academy Award (1996)
  • Dr. T. M. A. Pai Memorial Award in Manipal (1997)
  • University of Bombay Department of Chemical Technology’s Distinguished Alumnus Award (1999)
  • Millennium Konkani Sammelan Award, Illinois, U.S.A (2000)
  • Raja Rammohan Roy Library Foundation’s Award (2001)
  • Priyadarshni Academy Award (2002)
  • Vishwa Saraswat Sammaan (2003)

Personal life

He was a resident of Prabhadevi, Mumbai. He died on February 24 2011.He is survived by his wife, Lalita Pai.

 

Amar Chitra Katha

Amar Chitra Katha (Hindi: अमर चित्र कथा, amar citra kathā ?, "Immortal Captivating (or Picture) Stories") (Amar Chitra Katha PL)is one of India‘s largest selling comic bookseries, with more than 90 million copies sold in 20 Indian languages. Founded in 1967, the imprint has more than 400 titles that retell stories from the great Indian epics, mythology, history, folklore, and fables in a comic book format. It was created by Anant Pai, and published by India Book House. In 2007, the imprint and all its titles were acquired by a new venture called ACK Media. On September 17, 2008, a new website by ACK-media was launched.

Creation and creators

The comic series was started by Anant Pai in an attempt to teach Indian children about their cultural heritage. He was shocked that Indian students could answer questions on Greek and Roman mythology, but were ignorant of their own history, mythology and folklore. It so happened that a quiz contest aired on Doordarshan in February 1967, in which participants could easily answer questions pertaining to Greek mythology, but were unable to reply to the question "In theRamayana, who was Rama‘s mother?".

Writers like Kamala Chandrakant, Margie Sastry, Subba Rao, Debrani Mitra and C.R Sharma joined the creative team of Amar Chitra Katha, with Anant Pai taking on the role of editor and co-writer on most scripts. The notable illustrators, other than Ram Waeerkar, wereDilip Kadam, Sanjeev Waeerkar, Souren Roy, C.D Rane, Geoffrey Fowler and Pratap Mullick.

The comics

The original printings of Amar Chitra were not in full colour—because of budgetary constraints, the panels were printed using yellow, blue and green. Subsequent issues, however, changed to full colour. All Amar Chitra Katha books stuck to a monthly (later fortnightly) 30-page format, with emphasis on lucid, entertaining storylines. In addition to the ‘singles’ format the stories are also available as hardcover 3-in-1 and 5-in-1 bundles. There are special editions of the epics like the Mahabharata which is available in a 3 volume 1300+ pages set.

Occasionally there were "bumper" issues with 90 pages, most collecting stories of a similar type from individual issues( Example: Monkey Stories From The Hitopadesha, Tales of Birbal and some being longer stories The Story of Rama). As the epic stories became more popular, the team began to publish stories based on Indian history, of men and women belonging to different regions and religions and also on stories based on Sanskrit as well as regional classics. The continuous popularity of the comics led to reprints being issued frequently, which ensured that the back-issues remained in print throughout the seventies and the eighties. At the height of its popularity, in the mid-eighties, it had been translated into Bengali, Marathi, Assamese, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Sanskrit and Urdu and selling half a million copies a month. Some titles were also translated into French, Spanish, German, Swahili, Fijian, Indonesian, and Serbo-Croat.

Towards the mid-nineties, the original comics were reprinted in sleeker and more durable editions, with thick cardstock covers and better colour separations. Today, Amar Chitra Katha has a national footprint across all major book retailers, hundreds of small bookstores, and tens of thousands of vendors. It is the best-selling children’s publication in most large format stores.

In 2007, the publisher created a new online store that offers all the titles with shipping worldwide. The titles are divided in following categories

  1. Fables & Folktales (e.g. Panchatantra)
  2. Mythology (e.g. The Ramayana)
  3. The Epics (e.g. The Ramayana)
  4. Humour & wit
  5. Biographies (e.g. Mahatma Gandhi)
  6. Literary Classics
  7. 3 in 1 Titles
  8. 5 in 1 Titles
  9. Special Issues

Cultural significance

Amar Chitra Katha was launched at a time when Indian society was slowly moving away from the traditional joint family system, because of (among other things) socio-economic constraints and urbanization. In a joint family system, grandparents would regale the children of the household with tales from folklore and the epics, and the Amar Chitra Katha series served to fill the void left by grandparents in the smaller nuclear families in urban areas. The choice of English as the primary language led it to reach the majority of children who studied in English medium schools.

Later, when the comic added historical topics, it proved very helpful to students. For most, Indian history, a jumble of names and dates, came alive as stories. The detailed research of architecture, costumes, regional flavours and facts ensured that the comics were widely accepted into the mainstream, both parents and teachers using them as educational aids. To an extent, these books, with their homogenized and unbiased character descriptions went a long way in promoting national integration and increasing inter-provincial awareness throughout the country.

It should be mentioned that the series steered clear of controversy, taming down content and violence and adhering to strict self-censorship.

In popular culture

In the film Gulaal, a major character, Rananjay Singh express his disapproval of traditional patriarchal rajput machoism by saying that he does not want to live in Amar Chitra Katha but real world.

Modernisation

Amar Chitra Katha has evolved over times. Now it is available as a digital media in more means from online access to mobile phones. ACK-Media has recently partnered with iRemedi Corp of Atlanta, GA to deliver Amar Chitra Katha comics on the iPhone platform. Popular Amar Chitra Katha Comics were launched on the iPhone platform by iRemedi and Apple on 5th December, 2009. Amar Chitra Katha comics have been adapted for the iPhone platform for readers to enjoy panel by panel reading experience on the iPhones and iPod touches on iRemedi’s ETHER MEDIA viewer solution. More information can be found at iRemedi’s website.

Popular ACK Titles may be found directly in Apple’s iTunes Appstore.

Criticism

The stories are often simplistic and sometimes rely on authentic but singular sources for the script. This has led to the criticism that they should not be considered as "history". The illustrations in Amar Chitra Katha created a generation of Indians who could visualize historical and mythological characters only through these. These were often not very thoroughly researched and true picturisations, but were later emulated in TV series like ‘Mahabharata’ and ‘Ramayana’. A lot of these were derivatives of artist Raja Ravi Varma’s paintings and depictions. The simplistic portrayal of characters as villains and heroes (much like the ones in mainstream Hindi movies) betrayed an association with certain ethnic stereotypes. For example, all demons were portrayed with dark complexion.

Though some of these criticisms held valid in some comic series, many of the critics themselves are often politically motivated by the ideologies of their religion or academic institution; prejudice itself frequently forms the basis of some criticisms.

 

Courtesy: Wikipedia and various sources on Internet

Filed under: Author of the week, , ,

Meet the Poet at his residence: Prof.O.N.V. Kurup

Reader’s Club members met the famous Malayalam poet and winner of 2007 Gnanpith Award, Prof. O.N.V. Kurup at his residence in Thiruvananthapuram on 24 February 2010. They interacted with him on language, literature, reading and books. A memorable event !

IMG_2584

IMG_2587

 IMG_2545

 IMG_2549

IMG_2550

 IMG_2553

IMG_2555

IMG_2556

 IMG_2557

IMG_2558

IMG_2559

IMG_2560

IMG_2561

IMG_2562

 IMG_2563

 IMG_2564

IMG_2566

IMG_2567

IMG_2568

IMG_2569

 IMG_2571

 IMG_2572

IMG_2574

IMG_2575

IMG_2576

 IMG_2577

IMG_2579

IMG_2580

 IMG_2581

Filed under: Library activities, Reader's Club, , , , , , , , ,

New Arrivals (20 Feb.2011)

CALL No

Author

Title

Imprint

001  O’B-B

 O’Brien, Derek

 Book of knowledge. Vol. 1-3

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

001  O’B-B

 O’Brien, Derek

 Book of knowledge. Vol. 4-6

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

001  O’B-B

 O’Brien, Derek

 Book of knowledge. Vol. 7-9

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

001  O’B-B

 O’Brien, Derek

 Book of knowledge

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

001  SPI-O

 Spider Books

 Over 500 incredible facts

 Spider Books, Chennai

001  SPI-O

 Spider Books

 Over 500 magnificent facts

 Spider Books, Chennai

001  SPI-O

 Spider Books

 Over 500 stunning facts

 Spider Books, Chennai

001  SPI-O

 Spider Books

 Over 500 fabulous facts

 Spider Books, Chennai

100  DAL-F

 Dalai Lama

 Four noble truths

 Harper  Collins, London

300  IRA-I

 Ira Pandey, Ed.

 India 60: Towards a new paradigm

 Harper  Collins, New Delhi

310  GRI-H

 Griffiths, Dawn

 Head First Statistics

 Shroff publishers & Distributers pvt. Ltd. Mumbai

310  HOO-I

 Hooda R P

 Introduction to Statistics

 Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, Delhi

330  BAS-C

 Basu, Kaushik and Maertens, Annemie

 Concise oxford companion to economics in India

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

330  BIS-E

 Bishop, Matthew

 Economics: an A – Z guide

 Profile Books, London

330  DRE-I

 Dreze, Jean and Sen, Amartya

 India: developoment and participation

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

330  HOA-I

 Hoaj, Arleen J and Hoaj John H

 Introductory Economics

 World Scientific, Chennai

330.954  CHO-U2010

 Chopra, J K

 Unique quintessence of Indian economy (2009 – 10)

 Unique Publishers, New Delhi

338.5  MAN-M11

 Mansfield, Edwin and Peoples, James

 Microeconomic problems: case studies and exercises for review

 Viva books, New Delhi

338.5  SAL-P5

 Salvatore, Dominick

 Principles of Microeconomics

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

338.6  ATH-L

 Athukorala, Prema-chandra and Rajapatirana, Sarath

 Liberalization and industrial transformation : Sri Lanka in International perspective

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

338.62  OLS-P

 Olsen,Jan Abel

 Principles in health economics and policy

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

339  SIK-P

 Sikdar, Soumyen

 Principles of macroeconomics

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

370.11  VID-T2

 Vidyasagar, MVR

 Thoughts and reflections (A treatise in value education)

 Print Services, Bangalore

370.11  VID-T2

 Vidyasagar, MVR

 Thoughts and reflections (A treatise in value education)

 Print Services, Bangalore

370.11  VID-T2

 Vidyasagar, MVR

 Thoughts and reflections (A treatise in value education)

 Print Services, Bangalore

370.11  VID-T2

 Vidyasagar, MVR

 Thoughts and reflections (A treatise in value education)

 Print Services, Bangalore

370.11  VID-T2

 Vidyasagar, MVR

 Thoughts and reflections (A treatise in value education)

 Print Services, Bangalore

4S0  NAM-S

 Namboodhiri, D Sreeman

 Samskruthaprakasika: an encyclopedia on Sanskrit language

 Sahithi Books, Thrissur

580  TUD-S

 Tudge, Colin

 Secret life of trees: How they live and why they matter

 Penguin Books Inc., London

658.3  FOR-H

 Forsyth, Patrick

 How to motivate people

 Kogan Page India Private Limited, New Delhi

658.4  GUT-T

 Gutmann, Joanna

 Taking minutes of the meeting

 Kogan Page India Private Limited, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories:3

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories:3

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories:3

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories:8

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories: 2

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories: 1

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories: 1

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  AAK-P

 Aakanksha, ed.

 Panchatantra stories: 2

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  ANA-M

 Anant Pai, Ed.

 Mahabharata: on the battlefield of Kurukshetra vol. 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  ANA-M

 Anant Pai, Ed.

 Mahabharata: The Pandavas in exile. vol.2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  ANA-M

 Anant Pai, Ed.

 Mahabharata: The Kuru princess 3 vols.  – vol.1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  AND-L

 Andersen, Hans Chrisitian

 Little mermaid

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  ANG-A

 Angus Maciver, Retold

 Ali Baba and other stories

 Hodder Gibson, London

808.068  APA-R

 Aparna Nambiar

 Rama stories: Vali and Sugriva

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  APA-R

 Aparna Nambiar

 Rama stories: Vali and Sugriva

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  APA-R

 Aparna Nambiar

 Rama stories: Vali and Sugriva

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  APA-R

 Aparna Nambiar

 Rama stories: Vali and Sugriva

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  APA-R

 Aparna Nambiar

 Rama stories: Vali and Sugriva

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  AST-M

 Asthana. Girija Rani

 Mouse learns a lesson

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  AUS-P

 Austen, Jane

 Pride and prejudice

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

808.068  AUS-R

 Austen, Jane

 Robinhood and his merry men

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

808.068  BHA-M

 Bhanot T R

 Moral stories for children

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  BHA-M

 Bhanot T R

 Moral stories for children

 Shanti publications,Delhi

808.068  BHA-M

 Bhanot T R

 Moral stories for children

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  BHA-M

 Bhanot T R

 Moral stories for children

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Busy Little Noddy

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Busy Little Noddy

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Noddy’s Unlucky day

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Busy Little Noddy

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Noddy’s Unlucky day

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Noddy’s Unlucky day

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Noddy’s Unlucky day

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Noddy’s Unlucky day

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Busy Little Noddy

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BLY-N

 Blyton, Enid

 Busy Little Noddy

 Euro Books, London

808.068  BRO-J

 Bronte, Charlotte

 Jane Eyre

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  CHR-S

 Christie, Agatha

 Secret of chimneys

 Euro Books,Mumbai

808.068  DEE-W

 Deepa Agarwal

 Walking Tree

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  DEF-R

 Defoe, Daniel

 Robinson Crusoe

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  DIC-B

 Dickens, Charles

 Bleak house

 DC Books, Kottayam

808.068  DIC-B

 Dickens, Charles

 Bleak house

 DC Books, Kottayam

808.068  DIC-C

 Dickens, Charles

 Christmas Carol

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-C

 Dickens, Charles

 Christmas Carol

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Dickens, Charles

 David Copperfield

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Dickens, Charles

 David Copperfield

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: The roll of the dice

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: The great war

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: How it all began

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: The roll of the dice

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: How it all began

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-D

 Vyasa, Veda

 Mahabharata: The great war

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-G

 Dickens, Charles

 Great expectations

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DIC-G

 Dickens, Charles

 Great expectations

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  DUM-T

 Dumas, Alexander

 Three Musketeers

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the forbidden room

 Viva Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the genie

 Viva Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  FIE-T

 Fienberg, Anna

 Tashi and the big stinker

 Viva Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  GEE-S

 Geeta Menon, ed.

 Schooldays: a collection of 16 stories

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Aladdin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Ali Baba

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Aladdin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Ali Baba

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Alice in Wonderland

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-A

 Har-Anand

 Alice in Wonderland

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-B

 Har-Anand

 Beauty and the beast

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-B

 Har-Anand

 Beauty and the beast

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-C

 Har-Anand

 Cinderella

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-C

 Har-Anand

 Cinderella

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-D

 Har-Anand

 Donkey Skin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-D

 Har-Anand

 Donkey Skin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-E

 Har-Anand

 Emperor’s New clothes

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-E

 Har-Anand

 Emperor’s New clothes

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-H

 Har-Anand

 Hen and the Golden eggs

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-H

 Har-Anand

 Happy Prince

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-H

 Har-Anand

 Happy Prince

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-H

 Har-Anand

 Hen and the Golden eggs

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-J

 Har-Anand

 Jungle Book

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-J

 Har-Anand

 Jungle Book

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Match Seller

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Thumb

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Thumb

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Match Seller

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Mermaid

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Mermaid

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Red Riding Hood

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-L

 Har-Anand

 Little Red Riding Hood

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-M

 Har-Anand

 Maid and the Milk Pail

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-M

 Har-Anand

 Maid and the Milk Pail

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Princess and the Pea

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Pinocchio

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Pinocchio

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Pied Piper of Hamelin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Puss in Boots

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Pied Piper of Hamelin

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Princess and the Pea

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-P

 Har-Anand

 Puss in Boots

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Snow White

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Snow White

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Snow Queen

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Sindbad the Sailor

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Steadfast Tin Soldier

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Snow Queen

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Sindbad the Sailor

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-S

 Har-Anand

 Steadfast Tin Soldier

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-T

 Har-Anand

 Tortoise and the hare

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-T

 Har-Anand

 Tortoise and the hare

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-T

 Har-Anand

 Three Little Pigs

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-T

 Har-Anand

 Three Little Pigs

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-U

 Har-Anand

 Ugly Duckling

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HAR-U

 Har-Anand

 Ugly Duckling

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin:The broken ear

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: Red rackham’s treasure

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: Red rackham’s treasure

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: The castaflore emerald

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: The crab with the golden claws

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: Tintin in America

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: The blue lotus

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: Cigars of the pharaoh

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  HER-A

 Herge

 Adventures of Tintin: Explorers on the moon

 Egmont Books Ltd., London

808.068  IND-E

 Indira,C V

 Elephant & the Ant and other story….

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-E

 Indira,C V

 Elephant & the Ant and other story….

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-H

 Indira,C V

 Honest Raja and other story….

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-H

 Indira,C V

 Helpful Tanay and other story…

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-H

 Indira,C V

 Helpful Tanay and other story…

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-H

 Indira,C V

 Honest Raja and other story….

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-L

 Indira, C V

 Lazy Rahul and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  IND-L

 Indira, C V

 Lazy Rahul and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  IND-R

 Indira ananthakrishnan

 Rama and the squirrel

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  IND-T

 Indira,C V

 Tom the careful boy and other story…..

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-T

 Indira,C V

 Tom the careful boy and other story….

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  IND-W

 Indira Ananthakrishnan

 Washerman the donkey and the lion

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  JAN-P

 Jane Austen

 Pride and prejudice

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  JAY-C

 Jayashree Bhatt

 Chinni and the three cheats

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  JAY-K

 Jayashree Bhatt

 Krishna and the Yamalaarjuna Trees

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  KIP-J

 Kipling, Rudyard

 Treasure island

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  KIP-J

 Kipling, Rudyard

 Jungle Book

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  KOH-F

 Kohli, K S

 Famous tales of Tenali Raman

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  LIS-G

 Lisa Gammel

 Gujjars

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  LIT-A

 Litta Jacob

 Andersen’s : The emperor’s new clothes

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  LIT-A

 Litta Jacob

 Andersen’s : The emperor’s new clothes

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  LIT-A

 Litta Jacob

 Andersen’s : The emperor’s new clothes

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  LIT-A

 Litta Jacob

 Andersen’s : The emperor’s new clothes

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  LIT-A

 Litta Jacob

 Andersen’s : The emperor’s new clothes

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  MAC-C

 Macaw Books

 Cinderella: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-C

 Macaw Books

 Country Mouse & the Town Mouse: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-C

 Macaw Books

 Country Mouse & the Town Mouse: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-C

 Macaw Books

 Cinderella: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-E

 Macaw Books

 Elves & the shoemaker: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-E

 Macaw Books

 Elves & the shoemaker: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-E

 Macaw Books

 Elves & the shoemaker: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-F

 Macaw Books

 Frog Prince:Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-G

 Macaw Books

 Goldilocks & the Three Bears: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-G

 Macaw Books

 Gingerbread Man: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-G

 Macaw Books

 Goldilocks & the Three Bears: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-G

 Macaw Books

 Goldilocks & the Three Bears: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-H

 Macaw Books

 Hansel & Gretel: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-H

 Macaw Books

 Hare & the Tortoise: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-H

 Macaw Books

 Hansel & Gretel: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-L

 Macaw Books

 Little Red Riding hood: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-P

 Macaw Books

 Princess & the Pea: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-P

 Macaw Books

 Princess & the Pea: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-R

 Macaw Books

 Rumpelstiltskin: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-R

 Macaw Books

 Rumpelstiltskin: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 sky fox & the Little Red Hen: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 1

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 Sleeping beauty: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 Sleeping beauty: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 Snow White & the seven dwarfs: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 Snow White & the seven dwarfs: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-S

 Macaw Books

 Snow White & the seven dwarfs: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-U

 Macaw Books

 Ugly Duckling: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 3

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-W

 Macaw Books

 Wolf & the seven little kids: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-W

 Macaw Books

 Wolf & the seven little kids: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAC-W

 Macaw Books

 Wolf & the seven little kids: Tinkle Treasure Graded Readers – Level 2

 Amar Chitra Katha pvt. Ltd., Mumbai

808.068  MAU-R

 Maurier, Daphne

 Rebecca

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  MEE-1

 Meena Sharma, ed.

 140 famous grandpa’s tales

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  MEE-F

 Meena, Comp.

 Fairy Tales for children

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  MEE-F

 Meena, comp.

 Famous Classic Tales

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  MEE-F

 Meena, Comp.

 Famous stories of Tenali Raman

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  MEE-F

 Meena, Comp.

 Famous Jataka Tales

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  MRI-T

 Mrinalini Srivastava

 Tiger and the mosquito

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  RAD-A

 Radha Nair

 Appu stories: Appu and the circus

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  RAD-A

 Radha Nair

 Appu stories: Appu and the circus

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  RAD-A

 Radha Nair

 Appu stories: Appu and the circus

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  RAD-A

 Radha Nair

 Appu stories: Appu and the circus

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  RAD-A

 Radha Nair

 Appu stories: Appu and the circus

 DC Books, Bangalore

808.068  RAI-M

 Rainbow Books

 Moral Stories

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  RAI-M

 Rainbow Books

 Moral Stories

 Rainbow  Books, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-A

 Shakespeare, William

 As you like it

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanti publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanti publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanti publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanti publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanti publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanthi publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-C

 Shanthi publications

 Chimpu and the red cap and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-E

 Shanti publications

 Elephant and the ant and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-F

 Shanti publicatilons

 Famous stories of Akbar Birbal

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  SHA-F

 Shanti publicatilons

 Famous stories from Arabian nights

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  SHA-G

 Shanti publications

 Greeny and guava and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-G

 Shanti publications

 Greeny and guava and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shakespeare, William

 Julius Caesar

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shakespeare, William

 Macbeth

 Har-Anand Publicaions Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shanti publicatilons

 Moral stories for children

 Shanthi publications, Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shanthi publications

 Mickey & his toys and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shanthi publications

 Mickey & his toys and other story…..

 Shanthi publications,Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shakespeare, William

 Macbeth

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shankar

 Mitra ki parakh (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-M

 Shakespeare, William

 Merchant of Venice

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shankar

 Treasury of Indian Tales Book I

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shakespeare, William

 King Lear

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shankar

 Treasury of Indian Tales Book II

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shakespeare, William

 The Tempest

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shakespeare, William

 Twelfth Night

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-T

 Shakespeare, William

 The tempest

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHA-W

 Shakespeare, William

 Winter’s tale

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHI-S

 Shiv Kumar, Retold

 Stories from Panchatantra Book I

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Mutthu and the magical bowls

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Ass become a qazi

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Jayamala becomes the elephant queen

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Jhumru makes mechanical birds

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Kochunni the forgotten keys

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Clever Suyyan the lauging fish

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Rat whi bargains all the time

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Narayan the magical gem

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Bopoluchi the robber

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-N

 Shradha Anand, Retold

 Nishi boys the demons

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: Clothes make a man

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: The miserly carpenter

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: The miserly carpenter

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: Clothes make a man

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: The fragrant breeze

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SHR-S

 Shree Books

 Stories of Tenali Raman: The fragrant breeze

 Shree Book Centre, Mumbai

808.068  SPY-H

 Spyri, Johanna

 Heidi

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  SRI-Z

 Srinivasan, Harini Gopalaswami

 Zoo duck

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  SWA-M

 Swati Bhattacharjee

 Monkeys come to village

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

808.068  TWA-H

 Twain, Mark

 Huckleberry Finn

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  VER-A

 Verne, Jules

 Around the world in 80 days

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  VER-A

 Dickens, Charles

 Great expectations

 Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi

808.068  VIJ-C

 Vijita Mukherjee

 Chaalu plays a trick

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  VIJ-S

 Vijita Mukherjee

 Star – Blossom tree

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.068  VIJ-S

 Vijita Mukherjee

 Star – Blossom tree

 Amar Chitra Katha, Mumbai

808.84  BRY-N

 Bryson, Bill

 Notes from a big country

 Transworld Publishers, London

808.85  PRU-G

 Pruthi, R K, Ed.

 Great speeches: Including Nobel peace prize acceptance address

 Indiana Publications, New Delhi

821.08  DE -P

 De Souza, Eunice and Silgardo, Melanie

 Puffin book of poetry for children 101 poems

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

821.08  WOR-S

 Wordsworth, William

 Selected poems

 Hachette India, London

823  ANA-C

 Anand, Paro

 Classic stories for boys

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  ANI-F

 Anita Desai

 Fasing feasting

 Random House India, New Delhi

823  ANI-F

 Anita Desai

 Fire on the mountain

 Random House India, New Delhi

823  ANI-J

 Anita Desai

 Journey to ithaca

 Random House India, New Delhi

823  ANI-L

 Anita Nair

 Lessons in forgetting

 Harper  Collins, New Delhi

823  ANU-I

 Anu Kumar

 In the country of gold digging ants

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  ART-T

 Arthur, Robert

 Three investigators: The mystery of the green ghost

 Random House, New York

823  BAG-A

 Bagchi, Amitabha

 Above average

 Harper  Collins, New Delhi

823  BAN-B

 Banerjee, Anjali

 Bringing Back Grandfather

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  BAU-W

 Baum, L Frank

 Wizard of oz

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-A

 Bond, Ruskin

 A season of ghosts

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-N

 Bond, Ruskin

 Notes from a small room

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-R

 Bond, Ruskin

 Rusty and the leopard

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-R

 Bond, Ruskin

 Room on the roof

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-S

 Bond, Ruskin

 Strangers in the night : Two novellas

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  BON-W

 Bond, Ruskin

 When darkness fallsand other stories

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  CAR-A

 Carroll, Lewis

 Alice’s adventures in wonderland and Through the looking glass and what Alice found there

 Everymans Library, London

823  CHR-B

 Christie, Agatha

 Big four

 Harper  Collins, New Delhi

823  CHR-P

 Christie, Agatha

 Poirot’s early cases

 Harper, London

823  CHR-P

 Christie, Agatha

 Taken at the flood

 Harper, London

823  CHR-S

 Christie, Agatha

 Seven dials mystery

 Harper, London

823  CHR-T

 Christie, Agatha

 They came to Bagdad

 Harper Collins Publishers, London

823  COL-W

 Colfer, Eoin

 Wish list

 Puffin Books, London

823  DAH-A

 Dahl, Roald

 Ah, sweet mystery of life

 Penguin Books India Ltd., New Delhi

823  DAH-B

 Dahl, Roald

 Boy Tales of Childhood

 Puffin Books, England

823  DAH-D

 Dahl, Roald

 Danny the champion of the world

 Puffin Books, London

823  DIX-D

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Double deception # 27

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-D

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Dangerous transmission # 184

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-E

 Dixon, Franklin W

 End of the trail # 162

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-G

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Ghost stories

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-H

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Hardy boys: Deprivation house

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-H

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Hardy Boys, No.139: The search for the snow leopard

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  DIX-H

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Hardy Boys, No.17: Murder at the mall

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  DIX-H

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Hardy Boys, No.160: A game called chios

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  DIX-I

 Dixon, Franklin W

 In plane sight # 176

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-M

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Motocross madness # 190

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-M

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Mystery of the black rhino # 178

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-N

 Dixon, Franklin W

 No way out # 187

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-S

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Secret of the soldier’s gold # 182

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-S

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Search for the snow leopard # 139

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DIX-T

 Dixon, Franklin W

 Training for trouble # 161

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  DUM-T

 Dumas, Alexander

 Three Musketeers

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  DUR-A

 Durrell, Gerald

 Ark’s anniversary

 Westland books, Chennai

823  DUR-B

 Durrell, Gerald

 Bafut beagles

 Westland Books Pvt. Ltd., Chennai

823  DUR-C

 Durrell, Gerald

 Catch me a colobus

 Westland Books, Chennai

823  DUR-D

 Durrell, Gerald

 Drunken Forest

 Westland Books Pvt. Ltd., Chennai

823  DUR-R

 Durrell, Gerald

 Rosy is my relative

 Westland books, Chennai

823  DUR-S

 Durrell, Gerald

 Stationary Ark

 Westland Books Pvt. Ltd., Chennai

823  DUR-W

 Durrell, Gerald

 Whispering Land

 Westland Books Pvt. Ltd., Chennai

823  GAA-O

 Gaarder, Jostein

 Orange girl

 Phoenix, London

823  GAA-R

 Gaarder, Jostein

 Ringmaster’s daughter

 Phoenix, London

823  GAA-S

 Gaarder, Jostein

 Solitaire mystery

 Phoenix, London

823  HAG-K

 Haggard, H Rider

 King Solomon’s mines

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  JAC-F

 Jacobson, Howard

 Finkler Question

 Bloomsbury Books, London

823  JAY-S

 Jayashree Misra

 Secrets and lies

 Harper  Collins, New Delhi

823  JUN-W

 Jung, Saad Bin

 Wild tales from the wild

 Roli Books,New Delhi

823  KEE-A

 Keen, Carolyn

 Action # 6

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-B

 Keene, Carolyn

 Bad times, big crimes # 14

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-D

 Keene, Carolyn

 Dressed to steal # 22

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-E

 Keene, Carolyn

 En Garde # 17

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-F

 Keene, Carolyn

 False Notes # 3

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-H

 Keen, Carolyn

 High risk # 4

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-L

 Keene, Carolyn

 Lights, camera… # 5

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 8  Lights, camera…cats!

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 12 Valentine’s Day Secret

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew #2 Scream for ice cream

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 17 Wedding day disaster

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew:Trails of treachery # 25

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 7 The circus scare

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew #22 unicorn uproar

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 1sleepover sleuths

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 16 Thanksgiving thief

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew Framed # 15

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keene, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew, No.13: Chick-napped

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keene, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew, No.10: Ticket trouble

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keene, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew, No.14: The zoo crew

 Aladdin Paperbacks, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew: Trade wind danger # 13

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-N

 Keen, Carolyn

 Nancy Drew and the Clue crew # 3 Pony problems

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-O

 Keene, Carolyn

 Orchid thief # 19

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-P

 Keene, Carolyn

 Pit of vipers # 18

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-R

 Keene, Carolyn

 Riverboat ruse # 11

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-S

 Keene, Carolyn

 Scarlet Macaw Scandal # 8

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-S

 Keene, Carolyn

 Stolen relic # 7

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-T

 Keene, Carolyn

 Taste of danger – 174

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KEE-U

 Keene, Carolyn

 Uncivil acts  # 10

 Aladdin Books, New York

823  KIN-R

 Kinsella, Sophie

 Remeber me !

 Transworld Publishers, London

823  KIN-S

 Kinsella, Sophie

 Shopaholic abroad

 Transworld Publishers, London

823  KIN-T

 Kinsella, Sophie

 TwentieShopaholic and sister

 Transworld Publishers, London

823  KIN-T

 Kinsella, Sophie

 Twenties girl

 Transworld Publishers, London

823  LAR-G

 Larsson, Stieg

 Girl with the dragon tattoo: Millennium I

 Quercus, London

823  LAR-G

 Larsson, Stieg

 Girl who played with fire: Millennium II

 Quercus, London

823  LEE-T

 Lee, Harper

 To kill a mocking bird

 Arrow Books Ltd., London

823  LES-G

 Lessing, Doris

 Golden NoteBook

 Harper Perennial, London

823  LEW-C

 Lewis C S

 Chronicles of Narnia

 Harper  Collins, London

823  MAD-L

 Madhavan, N S

 Litanies of Dutch battery

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  MAD-V

 Madhavan Kutty

 Village before time

 India Ink, New Delhi

823  MAR-L

 Marquez, Gabriel Garcia

 Leaf storm

 Penguin Books India Ltd., New Delhi

823  MEN-B

 Menon, Anil

 Beast with nine billion feet

 Young Zuban, New Delhi

823  MEY-S

 Meyer, Stephenie

 Short second life of bree tanner: an eclipse novella

 Atom Books, London

823  NAR-S

 Narayan, RK

 Salt & Sawdust

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823  PAR-C

 Paro Anand

 Classic stories for boys

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  PUF-C

 Puffin

 Classic stories for girls

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  PUF-F

 Puffin Books

 Favourite Stories for Boys

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823  REH-A

 Rehman, Habib and Singh, Kishore

 A home for Gori

 Roli Books, New Delhi

823  RIO-P

 Riordan, Rick

 Percy Jackson

 Puffin Books, England

823  SAR-E

 Saramago, Jose

 Elephant’s journey

 Harvill Secker, London

823  SAR-S

 Saramoago, Jose

 Stone raft

 Harvell Press, London

823  SAR-Y

 Saramoago, Jose

 Year of the death of Richardo Reis

 Harvell Press, London

823  SEB-G

 Sebastian, Pradeep

 Groaning Shelef

 Hachette India , Gurgaon

823  SPY-H

 Spyri, Johanna

 Heidi

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  SWI-G

 Swift, Jonathan

 Gulliver’s travels

 Indiana Publishing House, New Delhi

823  TAG-G

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Grain of sand: Chokher Bali

 Penguin Books India Ltd., New Delhi

823  TAG-H

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Home and the world

 Wisdom tree, New Delhi

823  TAG-P

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Post office

 Wisdom tree, New Delhi

823  TAG-P

 Tagore, Rabindranath

 Collected stories

 Wisdom tree, New Delhi

823  TOL-B

 Tolkien, JRR

 Book of Lost Tales- Part-2

 Harper collins,London

823  TOL-B

 Tolkien J R R

 Book of lost Tales Part 1

 Harper Collins Publishers, London

823  TOL-F

 Tolkien, J R R

 Lord of the rings: Part 2; The two towers

 Harper  Collins, London

823  TOL-F

 Tolkien, J R R

 Lord of the rings: Part 2; Return of the king

 Harper  Collins, London

823  TOL-F

 Tolkien, J R R

 Fellowship of the ring Part 1: Lord of the rings

 Harper  Collins, London

823  TOL-H

 Tolkien J R R

 Hobbit

 Harper  Collins, London

823  VAS-B

 Vasudevan Nair, M T

 Bear with me, mother: memoirs and stories

 Viva Books , New Delhi

823  WEL-I

 Wells, H G

 invisible Man

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  WEL-T

 Wells, H G

 Time Machine

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  WEL-W

 Wells, H G

 War of the worlds

 Inner pages; Adarsh enterprises, New Delhi

823  WOD-H

 Wodehouse, P G

 Hot water

 Arrow Books Ltd., London

823.01  DAH-G

 Dahl, Roald

 Great automatic grammatizator and other stories

 Puffin Books, London

823.08  BON-N

 Bond, Ruskin

 Night train at Deoli and other stories

 Penguin Books, New Delhi

823.08  BON-R

 Bond, Ruskin

 Room on the roof

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

823.08  PUF-F

 Puffin Books

 Favourite stories for boys

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

828.08  CAR-C

 Carrol, Lewis

 Complete Illustrated  works of Lewis Carroll

 Bounty Books, Londoan

828.08  WIL-C

 Wilde, Oscar

 Complete Illustrated  works of Oscar Wilde

 Bounty Books, Londoan

920  KAM-A

 Kamala Das

 A childhood in Malabar; a Memoir

 Penguin Books India Ltd., New Delhi

920.02  RAD-L

 Radhakrishnan, S

 Living with a purpose

 Orient Paperbacks, New Delhi

920.054  SUB-A

 Subhadra Sen Gupta

 Ashoka: The great and compassionate king

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

923.1  LAM-F

 Lama, Dalai

 Freedom in exile: The autobiography of his Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet

 Abacus, London

923.154  ADI-J

 Aditi De

 Jawaharlal Nehru: The jewel of India

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

923.154  SUB-M

 Subhadra Sen Gupta

 Mahatma Gandhi: The father of the nation

 Puffin Books, New Delhi

928  CHR-A

 Christie, Agatha

 Autobiography

 Harper  Collins, London

H 808.068  ALA-B

 Alaka Sankar

 Bahadur boofy (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ALA-D

 Alaka Sankar

 Dost banaye naye-naye(h)

 Children’s Book Trust India, New Delhi

H 808.068  ALA-S

 Alaka Sankar

 Sonali ka mitra (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  AMI-K

 Amit Pandey

 Kisne khaye malpuye (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-L

 Asha Nehemiya

 Lurhkta pahiya (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-L

 Asha Nehemiya

 Lurhkta pahiya (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-L

 Asha Nehemiya

 Lurhkta pahiya (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-N

 Asha Nehemiya

 Nirale uphaar (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-R

 Asha Nehemiya

 Raja ki moochhen (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-R

 Asha Nehemiya

 Raja ki moochhen (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-R

 Asha Nehemiya

 Raja ki moochhen (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  ASH-S

 Asha Nehemiah

 Shrimati oonwala ke ajeeb sweater (h)

 Children’s Book Trust India, New Delhi

H 808.068  AST-E

 Asthana, Girija Rani

 Ek dost saanp (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  DEE-N

 Deepa Agarwal

 Naya Mitra(h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  DEE-N

 Deepa Agarwal

 Naya Mitra(h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  DEV-D

 Devika Rangachari

 Duniya rang birangi (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  HEM-C

 Hemlatha Deepak

 Chooha party zindabad (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  IND-K

 Indira ananthakrishnan

 Kichu kechua (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  MRI-T

 Mrinalini Sreevastav

 Titu ne dekhi aatishbaazi (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  PHU-A

 Phular, Louis Hamilton

 Adiyal gaay (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  PHU-C

 Phular, Louis Hamilton

 Chhota Sher Bada Sher (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  PHU-C

 Phular, Louis Hamilton

 Chhota Sher Bada Sher (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  RUP-N

 Rupa Gupta

 Naya khilari(h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  RUP-P

 Rupa Gupta

 Pedh ki kritangyata (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SEN-O

 Sen, Benitha

 Oly aur poly (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-A

 Shankar

 Amma sabki pyari amma (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-N

 Shankar

 Natkhat bandar va ek aur kahani (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-N

 Shankar

 Natkhat bandar va ek aur kahani (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-S

 Shankar

 Sunahara Hiran (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-S

 Shankar

 Sunahara Hiran (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHA-S

 Shankar

 Sunahara Hiran (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SHI-M

 Shivkumar

 Marna kya na karta (h)

 Children’s Book Trust India, New Delhi

H 808.068  SRE-A

 Sreevastav, Sigaroon

 April Fool (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SRE-A

 Sreevastav, Sigaroon

 April Fool (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SRE-C

 Sreenivasan, Harini Gopalaswami

 Chidiyaghar ki battakh (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SRE-K

 Sreevastav, Mrinalini

 Kaun bada (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SRE-K

 Sreevastav, Mrinalini

 Kaun bada (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SUB-C

 Subadra Malavi

 Chandamama ka pajama: kavitha sangrah (h)

 Children’s Book Trust India, New Delhi

H 808.068  SUB-C

 Subadra Malavi

 Chutarputar ki chhalaang avam anya kahaniyan (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SUB-M

 Subadra Malavi

 Moonchhen Taane Pahunche Thaane: Kavitha sangrah (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  SUB-M

 Subadra Malavi

 Moonchhen Taane Pahunche Thaane : Kavitha sangrah (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  THA-S

 Tharun Cherian

 Sooraj ka roomal (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  VAL-B

 Valter Luther

 Binu bhalu (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H 808.068  VAL-B

 Valter Luther

 Binu bhalu (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

H808.068  SAN-K

 Sangeetha Gupta and Vineeta Krishna

 Kach-kach (h)

 Childrens Book Trust, New Delhi

R 330.03  BLA-D

 Black, John, Hashimzade, Nigar and Myles, Gareth

 Dictionary of economics

 Oxford University Press, New Delhi

Filed under: New Book Alert

Book Exhibition on Tagore and Mother Teresa

Mother Teresa: Birth centenary

Tagore: 150th Birth Anniversary

22-26 February 2011 @ The Library

Filed under: Exhibitions,Displays, ,

Tools for Learning: Connected and Engaged

By Victor Rivero – Posted Jan 1, 2011

Continuing proliferation of social learning platforms, mobile devices, and new apps ease students into real learning.

Online. Blended. Mobile. 21 st-century. Collaborative. Project-based. Any way you label it, learning is changing. After an initial explosion of new technologies, we’re now beginning to pick up the pieces, sort things out, and settle into an exciting new paradigm of connected, engaged learning like we’ve never had.

Online growth is clicking upward at 30% per annum according to the International Association for K-12 Online Learning.

Blended, the new norm (Google “blended learning” and witness 1.8 million results and rising) adds a rich concoction of online benefits to traditional classrooms.

Mobile learning is moving the “class” out of the “room,” where academic use of e-readers, handhelds, iPhones, iPods, iPads, and Androids are signaling a mad rate of growth that is expected to drop-call the PC to become the most popular path onto the web within 5 years according to the ITU.

For those considering a classroom cell phone ban, listen up: Analysts observed that at 2009’s end, nearly 520 million mobile device users browsed the web—and by 2010, mobile subscribers had surpassed 5 billion—that’s more than 70% of the world’s population connecting to the web via cells. Can you hear me now?

As for collaborative learning, witness Edmodo’s Facebook-like growth as it chats its way across 10,000 schools in less than 2 years passing a 500,000-user mark, making it the fastest-growing social network for education.

Or how about Blackboard chalking up the acquisition of Wimba and Elluminate to present the most advanced virtual classroom offerings ever, spanning more than 2,600 K–12 and higher education institutions?

In October 2010, Google added some more zeros to its length in announcing that its Google Apps Education Edition topped 10 million users—glutted with nearly 2 million new ones in the brief 2 weeks before school started.

Project-based is the de facto modus operandi for all of education these days; players such as Discovery Education haven’t missed the point as they continue producing enough offerings to begin replacing basal curriculums for entire states, while smaller homegrown players such as Khan Academy get thumbs up for maintaining 92,764 Facebook likes and more than 28 million lessons delivered.

Not to mention Apple-inspired education apps—these little learning gems aren’t going away any time soon. If ever there were a treasure trove of ways to make learning fun—of presenting a school subject in its most fascinating form—well then, students and teachers are striking it rich in this area. Online, blended, mobile, 21 st-century, collaborative, and project-based learning are all rolled into one when you consider the nonstop line of iPad-, iPhone-, iPod touch- and android-compatible applications dropping into learners’ hands.

Whether or not we all feel it (according to the Right to Succeed foundation, more than 50% of our kids are dropping out of high school; in 10 years more than 65 million kids will not be able to sustain themselves and are headed for either welfare or jail; seehttp://righttosucceed.org), there has been a bit of a delayed phenomenon of technology development finally catching up to once nascent academic-minded great intentions, where—if it’s not already too late—a new technology-assisted Golden Age of education is yet possible.

The missing keys that will turn the lock and open up the treasure are our own individual and subsequently combined efforts in making it happen.

Take a look at the sites, services, and resources we’ve noted right here in this article. With these and so many other shining examples of what’s already working, it’s not a mystery of how to get there, but only a matter of will and focus. We’ll remove the barriers that might stand in our way. May these technology tools assist you in moving forward and good luck!

Contact Victor at victor@VictorRivero.com.

Three Heavyweights

Edmodo. This is an academic networking site (akin to Facebook and Twitter) for teachers and students. Check out the homepage for a recently posted brilliant, funky-cool cartoonish video. Using a biology class osmosis analogy, the Edmodo summary employs some irony in defining a new phenomenon in education called “Internet/Social Networking Osmosis,” explaining: “A process that Francesca (McFarsight, fictional classroom teacher) likes to break down like this: the way that students and teachers interact with technology outside of the classroom is driving change within the classroom, and in a good way, for the benefit of learning—if the filter/membrane part works properly. Of course, the best example of this positive phenomenon is Francesca’s favorite new educational tool called Edmodo, the trusted Web 2.0 environment where teachers can safely share ideas, files and assignments with their students and other teachers in real time.” So, yep, it’s social learning for classrooms. And soon enough, possibly even now—this will all feel as tired as a how-Facebook-works lecture.

Glogster. Say that out loud! Feels clunky and sweet, like the Monsters, Inc. movie from Pixar a few years back but offers much more to keep kids engaged in school. A mashup of “graphical blog”—Glogster helps students create interactive posters demonstrating their own personal passions, interests, and knowledge. A virtual version of a student’s very own science fair table, it’s not science-exclusive but accommodates any subject. You’ve used Google as a verb, so try this on: “Edmodo this Glog.” Figure that one out (your students won’t even flinch at what that means) and you are doing all right. Create cool stuff, collaborate on class projects, manage them, search for activities, and align it all to national standards. Glog now at http://edu.glogster.com.

Discovery Education on iPad. With an initial offering of more than 33,000 video items, this mobile version of the traditional PC-based counterpart recently launched for the iPad. Targeted keyword searches, visual browsing by subject, and video are all there. Advanced search and touchscreen navigation exist now; additional video content, images, audio clips, PDFs, and encyclopedia articles will expand the collection—one of the most immersive and well-done learning experiences you’ll find anywhere.

Top 10 Coolest Apps for Education

For any age and any subject, apps help to present new concepts in their simplest and most interesting form or to offer a treasure trove of tools that would be otherwise impossible to carry around in one’s pockets. Calculators, periodic tables, dictionaries, face-to-face collaboration tools, literary learning guides, art gallery flashcards, math drills, and more make up some of the most attractive and useful learning tools ever assembled for use on a single device. Most of these are iPhone-, iPod touch-, Android- and (some are) iPad-compatible. This list comprises a few of the coolest apps we’ve seen for educational use, but understand that there are new ones coming out every day. The phrase “there’s an app for that” stretches both the educator’s and the developer’s imaginations. Read about them here, but experience them for yourself and write to us with your own favorites!

>> 10

Art. From Picasso, Dali, Warhol, and Matisse to O’Keeffe, Kahlo, Pollock, and more, students can view high-quality images of famous works of art and artist biographies. They can even collect their own pieces by saving pictures to browse through, improving their knowledge of art and art history. With more than 200 artists, more than 6,000 pictures in portrait and landscape modes and even a “who’s the artist?” quiz, this app is a masterpiece you can’t stop looking at.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/art/id298808100?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D6

>> 9

Blackboard Mobile Learn. Works with Blackboard’s web-based teaching and learning software, but your school must enable it before you get started as it provides access to important and secure information. Once enabled, it’s free. Grades, announcements, discussion boards, course blogs, and course content are all here. That’s the really cool part. It’s simply what you’d expect: intuitive and easy to use, and you can post stuff, read assignments, find out what’s new, and take it all with you. The “dog ate my homework” excuses might transform to “forgot all about it because my phone crashed,” but even that’s a “likely” story.

www.blackboard.com/Mobile/Mobile-Learn.aspx

>> 8

PocketCAS Lite. A free graphic calculator, there’s no longer any need to go out and purchase that fancy scientific one you need. Input your formulas and take advantage of the highest number of available mathematical functions anywhere; you’ll be solving every math problem you can imagine. Helpful tutorials guide you through. Contextual help is also available, providing an abundance of examples. Graphs are easily scrolled and zoomable. Being the “lite” version is app-speak meaning the free version, which implies that a pro version is also available for a cost.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/free-graphic-calculator-pocketcas/id333261649?mt=8

>> 7

SkyORB. We’d give this five stars, but it offers so many more. Not just a simple map, it’s actually a 3D planetarium, search engine, and sun clock. Using GPS automatic detection technology, you can fine-tune your observation location, and sunrise, sunset, moonrise, and moonset times are all computed as well. Rotate freely in 360 degrees at 60 frames per second and observe moons, planets, and other celestial bodies. After some use, you’ll begin to understand that you’re standing on a planet and what this particular app offers is all around you.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/skyorb/id338051358?mt=8

>> 6

Math Drills Lite. Sure, they’ve been called drill and kill because of potentially tiresome effects on a student who repetitively uses them, but this math driller is graphically rich and fun to use. Number lines, wooden block, facts and hints, as well as the option to work with up to 10 students makes this an entirely enticing experience. Take tests, earn high scores and awards, and turn math into less of a chore and more of a video game. Teachers can visually track student progress with accuracy and speed graphs.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/math-drills-lite/id302881372?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D2#

>> 5

Shmoop—To Go. The talented and witty writers at Shmoop invite you to “put a Ph.D. in your pocket.” They’re not kidding, but don’t get the wrong idea. This experience is anything but esoteric and boring. Shmoop is Yiddish for “to move something forward” and that’s exactly what they do for literature, poetry, Shakespeare, best-selling books, U.S. History, civics, economics, biographies, music, and even prealgebra. There are also groovy college application guides, AP exams, and PSAT and SAT help. Not many sites out there have on display such an infectious passion for learning oozing through the words on the site. Read Shmoop eBooks and apps “on a plane, under a tree, in a canoe” and have an absolutely great time!

www.shmoop.com/iphone-ipod-apps

>> 4

FaceTime. What Skype has done for videoconferencing over the computer, FaceTime is doing for iPhone users. The usefulness of this app cannot be overstated, but it may require some added creativity from students and teachers in terms of just what they are supposed to do with such an opportunity. Project collaboration, field trips to museums and parks, talks with zoo staff, and on-the-spot make-up for physically absent children now virtually present are some of the uses that can be applied with FaceTime.

www.apple.com/iphone/features/facetime.html

>> 3

Dictionary.com – Dictionary & Thesaurus. The world of learning is open to those who speak the language—but you’ve got to know the words. Carrying around a million of them is no longer a phone-book sized burden, and finding the precise one is as easy as typing it in. There’s also room for 90,000 synonyms and antonyms, and the audio pronunciations are especially nice. For most of the options, you don’t even need an internet connection once you have the app. An interesting gimmick: Shake the device to see a randomly selected word.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dictionary-com-dictionary/id364740856?mt=8

>> 2

The Elements: A Visual Exploration. In describing the hardcover book version that this app is based on, one author so eloquently stated: “This glorious book is more than just a guide to the elements; it will fundamentally deepen your appreciation of the substances that make up our world.” Now, that glorious book has been brought alive through one of the most stunning apps ever to walk the halls of a high school. Considering the “toughest class” reputation so often bestowed upon chemistry, this is a clear case of presenting a subject in its simplest and most interesting form in order to elicit its clear and thorough comprehension. No, it’s not the students who were “stupid”—they just lacked the proper Elements—more than 500 freely rotatable live objects one can examine from all sides, leaving no stone unturned.

http://periodictable.com/ipad

>> 1

Read Me Stories. Picture books that talk—isn’t that just the cutest thing in the world? Practical too. Drive, shop, or have a coffee while your child takes in new concepts and ideas and learns how to pronounce and read the words that go along with them. There’s a free trial; get a new talking picture every day you use this app. Keep track of your child’s favorites, and if you really can’t get enough, click directly over to Amazon to purchase the print versions. Enjoy them (your young child and these early-reader books) while you still can!

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/read-me-stories-childrens/id362042422?mt=8

 

Courtesy: http://www.internetatschools.com

Filed under: Article of the Week,

Booking to the Future

Paper or electronic? Futurists have been pushing one option for years—but do we have to choose?

It’s no secret that librarians like books. For decades, those pages sandwiched between rectangles of cardboard have been the primary reason librarians sought and secured employment. As methods of communication and information sharing evolve, however, books have begun to transform, sparking a debate not only among book publishers and readers but librarians as well.

In response to a hot-button issue in the library profession nationwide, the Library Research Service (LRS), a unit of the Colorado State Library, conducted a survey to check current library professionals’ predictions for the future of the paper book. It’s probably no surprise that respondents thought the trend would be toward electronic formats. But for a variety of reasons, paper books refuse to die a quiet death.

In December 2009, LRS posted an eight-question survey titled “The Future of the Book” on the homepage of its website and sent the link to multiple state, regional, and national library-related discussion lists. Survey questions asked respondents whether they owned an e-reader; whether or when they thought paper books would disappear; what format they currently used and expected to use in 10 years to read fiction, nonfiction, and textbooks; and what they predicted libraries would circulate in 10 years. Respondents were offered 2–5 answer options to these questions.

Over the course of a month, 1,326 respondents, representing all 50 states and 24 countries, completed the survey. A third of respondents worked in public libraries, a quarter in academic, and almost one out of five in school libraries. More than seven out of 10 survey respondents left comments to an open-ended question about their thoughts on the future of the book.

LRS staff evaluated the comments—ranging in tone from philosophical to passionate to practical—and collectively identified the six most frequently mentioned factors in the paper-versus-electronic-format debate: the existence of multiple formats, technological advantages, emotional/aesthetic appeal, content, cost, and time/generational change. After coding each comment according to which topics it addressed, LRS staff were able to analyze how the comments related to other survey responses.

Looking into the crystal ball

Overall, almost two out of three (63%) respondents claimed that paper books would never disappear, and half that number (33%) predicted their demise in from 21 to 100 or more years (see Chart 1). The remaining 4% anticipated that paper books would vanish within the next two decades. These numbers shifted when the 16% of respondents who reported owning an e-reader were singled out: E-reader owners were nearly three times as likely as non-owners to predict that paper books would disappear by 2030.

Despite the overwhelming conviction that paper books would not become extinct in the immediate future, the question remains as to what extent libraries will circulate them in, say, 10 years. Of the entire survey group, 43% of respondents predicted that libraries would circulate about the same amount of physical and electronic materials, and slightly fewer (39%) anticipated more electronic than physical. Less than half that percentage (16%) thought physical materials would continue to be more common. The prediction that libraries would increasingly favor electronic resources did not extend to a sentiment that libraries were growing irrelevant or would become completely virtual; less than 1% of survey respondents thought libraries would not exist or would circulate only electronic materials in 10 years.

Survey respondents’ predictions of their personal format choices also revealed a substantial drift toward electronic. In 10 years, the number of respondents who read fiction, nonfiction, and textbooks electronically could escalate from three to six times their current percentages, while paper use would decrease accordingly.

  Although these increases may appear drastic, use of electronic formats is starting from a point that leaves almost nowhere to go but up. Respondents’ current use of electronic formats was still relatively low–just 5% for fiction, compared with the 88% who opted for paper–and the majority expected paper to continue to be their preferred format for fiction and nonfiction. The most drastic changes were anticipated in the textbook business, with estimates that electronic use would increase from 10% to 59%, cutting use of paper textbooks to less than half–just 40%–by 2020 (see Charts 3 and 4).

Two sides of the same coin

Despite the apparent consensus that much textbook use would migrate to electronic formats, survey respondents’ comments revealed contradictory opinions about this inevitability. Some respondents argued that electronic formats could be much more affordable and convenient for students, while others identified e-books’ subpar note-taking capabilities and the lack of color for scientific charts as reasons that paper remains a better option for academics.

This type of back-and-forth debate was no less animated for other types of reading. Format preference for fiction inspired ardent remarks from respondents, many of whom touted the emotional or aesthetic appeal of reading a paper book. As some put it, curling up in front of a fire with a cup of cocoa and an electronic machine just didn’t sound as cozy as feeling the textured paper and smelling the faint musty odor of a favorite old paperback. One respondent remarked, “Who wants to read their kid a bedtime story using a Kindle?”

Interestingly, survey respondents used similar points to argue both sides of an issue. For example, fans of both paper and electronic books claimed that their preferred format was more desirable because it was conveniently portable. Each format offers specific technological advantages to recommend it, but six in 10 survey respondents who commented on the subject found more to like about paper books’ durability, freedom from battery or electric power, and ease on the eyes. Only one in four had such positive things to say about e-books’ convenience or various enhancements (see Chart 5).

In addition to technological advantages, survey respondents cited lower cost as a benefit for both e-books and paper books. Here again, paper books seemed to win the argument: Two out of three comments said paper books were cheaper, while one in four argued that e-books were more cost effective. Furthermore, one in 10 of the respondents who commented on cost or technological advantages did not specify whether e-books or paper books held the upper hand.

More survey respondents agreed with the idea that multiple formats would coexist in the future, that it’s not an either-or debate. Nearly half of survey comments (46%) referenced previous format changes or identified potential for increased accessibility through alternative formats. “If a book interests people it will be published and ‘read,’ regardless of format, and regardless of whether ‘reading’ actually means reading, viewing, listening, or participating, or all four,” one respondent said.

Similarly, many survey respondents saw electronic books as simply one more way to make information available. In fact, one in five comments (18%) emphasized content over format, articulating one of two beliefs, best expressed in respondents’ own words: “Content, not containers! It’s not about the book–it’s about what’s inside of it” and “Different formats work for different audiences and purposes.”

Several survey respondents noted that children’s literature and art books would be the last, if ever, to migrate to electronic formats because of the superior quality and aesthetic appearance of print illustrations. Many comments conveyed the thought that electronic formats were most conducive to presenting news and informational reading–shorter texts, perhaps–while pleasure reading also would remain largely in print. That said, a number of survey respondents claimed the opposite, that some informational material, especially in academic categories, might be better absorbed and assimilated by reading paper books and that “throwaway” fiction or quick pleasure reads could be more compatible with transient electronic formats.

In addition to those influences on format choice, one in 10 comments expressed the thought that only time would tell. As younger, digital-oriented generations age, their preference for electronic gadgets may lead to a greater shift away from paper at the same time improvements to the technology become more frequent.

Future is still fuzzy

At the merest prompt, a discussion of the future of the book sends librarians and avid readers into zealous debate, with one group defending paper, a second advocating for electronic formats, and yet another scratching their heads in undecided confusion. Contributing to the chaotic conversation are reports trumpeted by companies such as Amazon, which announced this summer that Kindle e-book sales had surpassed those of hardcover books. While neither hardcover nor electronic book sales can hold a candle to paperbacks, electronic books are clearly emerging as a significant market share in the publishing industry. E-reading devices are becoming more affordable–at the time of this writing, the latest rendition of the Kindle, with free 3G wireless, was going for $189–and new devices such as the iPad offer free applications that bring together previously incompatible e-book formats (and in color, too!). These developments, which occurred after LRS conducted this survey at the end of 2009, have already addressed some of the respondents’ concerns about e-books; even so–or perhaps as a result–it is still difficult to judge how electronic books and reading devices will change in the coming year, let alone the next decade.

If nothing else, the 71% of survey respondents who left additional comments indicated that the book’s future is indeed a topic of fervent concern. An important point to note, however, is that 86% of survey respondents reported working in a library. Compared with casual patrons and users, most librarians are likely to have more ardent feelings about the traditional book or book formats in general. Yet no matter what librarians think, it is library users who will guide the future demand for format options in books and libraries. Perhaps this demographic should be surveyed next, to try to get a clearer view of their expectations.

One thing the survey does make clear is that many factors influence format choice for any type of book. Cost, technology, emotional/aesthetic appeal, content, and even the passage of time all will play a role in whether, when, and how the traditional paper book will change. “The book in some form will always be around,” one survey respondent sagely remarked. “We just may not recognize the form our grandkids or great-grandkids call a ‘book.’”

JAMIE E. HELGREN, an MLIS student at the University of Denver, is a research fellow at the Library Research Service, a unit of the Colorado State Library.

Courtesy: http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Filed under: Article of the Week, ,

Nomad by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

by

Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Free Press, London

Library Call No: 303.4  ALI-N

(Visit the Library to read the Book)

If there were a “Ms. Globalization” title, it might well go to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Somali woman who wrote the best-­selling memoir“Infidel.” She has managed to outrage more people — in some cases to the point that they want to assassinate her — in more languages in more countries on more continents than almost any writer in the world today.

Now Hirsi Ali is working on antagonizing even more people in yet another memoir. “Nomad” argues that Islam creates dysfunctional families — like her own — and adds that these distorted families constitute “a real threat to the very fabric of Western life.” Western countries, she says, should be less tolerant of immigrants who try to preserve their lifestyles in their new homelands. It might seem presumptuous to write another memoir so soon, but Hirsi Ali is a remarkable figure who has plenty of memories to record.

She was born in Somalia in 1969. Her family fled to avoid political repression, and she grew up in Kenya, Ethiopia and Saudi Arabia, collecting languages the way some kids collect postage stamps. For a time, she was a fervent Muslim, but when her father ordered her to marry a stranger, she struck out on her own, disgracing the family and shocking herself, and settled in the Netherlands.

Hirsi Ali studied political science — she is clearly intellectually brilliant — and ended up as a member of the Dutch Parliament. If the rapid transformation of a Somali girl into an outspoken black, female, immigrant member of Parliament seems extraordinary, it was just the beginning. Soon her critique of Islam was leading to death threats, her citizenship was threatened by Dutch officials and she moved to a new refuge in the United States. Even now, she needs bodyguards.

That’s partly because she is by nature a provocateur, the type of person who rolls out verbal hand grenades by reflex. After her father’s death, Hirsi Ali connects by telephone with her aging and long-estranged mother living in a dirt-floor hut in Somalia. Hirsi Ali asks forgiveness, but the conversation goes downhill when her mother pleads with her to return to Islam. Near tears, her mother asks: “Why are you so feeble in faith? . . . You are my child and I can’t bear the thought of you in hell.”

“I am feeble in faith because Allah is full of misogyny,” Hirsi Ali thinks to herself. “I am feeble in faith because faith in Allah has reduced you to a terrified old woman — because I don’t want to be like you.” What she says aloud is: “When I die I will rot.” (For my part, I couldn’t help thinking that perhaps Hirsi Ali’s family is dysfunctional simply because its members never learned to bite their tongues and just say to one another: “I love you.”)

Since Hirsi Ali denounces Islam with a ferocity that I find strident, potentially feeding religious bigotry, I expected to dislike this book. It did leave me uncomfortable and exasperated in places. But I also enjoyed it. Hirsi Ali comes across as so sympathetic when she shares her grief at her family’s troubles that she is difficult to dislike. Her memoir suggests that she never quite outgrew her rebellious teenager phase, but also that she would be a terrific conversationalist at a dinner party.

She is at her best when she is telling her powerful story. And she is at her worst when she is using her experience to excoriate a variegated faith that has more than one billion adherents. Her analysis seems accurate in its descriptions of Somalis, Saudis, Yemenis and Afghans, but not in her discussion, say, of Indonesian Muslims — who are more numerous than those other four nationalities put together.

To those of us who have lived and traveled widely in Africa and Asia, descriptions of Islam often seem true but incomplete. The repression of women, the persecution complexes, the lack of democracy, the volatility, the anti-Semitism, the difficulties modernizing, the disproportionate role in terrorism — those are all real. But if those were the only faces of Islam, it wouldn’t be one of the fastest-growing religions in the world today. There is also the warm hospitality toward guests, including Christians and Jews; charity for the poor; the aesthetic beauty of Koranic Arabic; the sense of democratic unity as rich and poor pray shoulder to shoulder in the mosque. Glib summaries don’t work any better for Islam than they do for Christianity or ­Judaism.

Where Hirsi Ali is exactly right, I think, is in her focus on education as a remedy. It’s the best way to open minds, promote economic development and suppress violence. In the long run education is a more effective weapon against terrorists than bombs are.

Because she is an immigrant, Hirsi Ali emphasizes the difficulties that immigrants, particularly Muslims, have in adjusting to life in Western societies. In the course of telling her own story, she identifies three central problems. First is Islam’s treatment of women. “The will of little girls is stifled by Islam. . . . They are reared to become submissive robots who serve in the house as cleaners and cooks.”

Second is the lack of experience that many Muslim immigrants have had with money and credit. Hirsi Ali recounts how, after her arrival in the Netherlands, she received an apartment through the government with the option of a loan of up to $4,000 to furnish it and pay utilities. A Dutch friend offered to take her to a discount furniture store, but Hirsi Ali had dreamed of something upscale. So she and her Somali roommate, Yasmin, went to a high-end store and bought wall-to-wall carpeting and wallpaper — and that used up almost the entire loan.

“The money was worth nothing here. Was the whole loan about just a carpet? We quickly decided it was God’s will. There was no need to quarrel: Allah had willed it thus.” Soon Hirsi Ali was thousands of dollars in debt, and she argues that many foreigners have similar troubles with Western credit and finance.

The third problem is a propensity to violence in the family, as well as in religious vocabulary and tradition. “I don’t want to create the impression that all people from Muslim countries or tribal societies are aggressive,” she writes — and then she proceeds to do just that. She declares: “Islam is not just a belief; it is a way of life, a violent way of life. Islam is imbued with violence, and it encourages violence. Muslim children all over the world are taught the way I was: taught with violence, taught to perpetuate violence, taught to wish for violence against the infidel, the Jew, the American Satan.”

This is the kind of exaggeration that undermines the book. If the points about women and money are largely true, the point about violence seems to me vastly overstated. Yes, corporal punishment is common in madrassas, as it was in the rural Oregon schools where I grew up, and as it continues to be in Texas. Beatings may be regrettable, but they don’t typically turn children into terrorists.

During a recent trip to Sudan, I was speaking to a Muslim Arab in Khartoum. When I said I was from the United States, he looked quite shocked and said worriedly: “Oh! It is very violent there.” I’ve had similar experiences in Yemen, Somalia, Pakistan and Afghanistan, with people in those countries expressing concern about my safety in violent New York. They generalize too much from American movies.

It’s true that public discussion in some Muslim countries has taken on a strident tone, full of over-the-top exaggerations about the West. Educated Muslims should speak out more against such rhetoric.

In the same way, here in the West, we should try to have a conversation about Islam and its genuine problems — while speaking out against over-the-top exaggerations about the East. This memoir, while engaging and insightful in many places, exemplifies precisely the kind of rhetoric that is overheated and overstated.

 

Reviewed by

Nicholas D. Kristof is an Op-Ed columnist at The Times and the author, with Sheryl WuDunn, of “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.”

Courtesy: http://www.nytimes.com

Filed under: Book of the week, ,

Inspiring Talks (Videos)

Filed under: Inspiring Talks (Videos)

Library Podcasts

http://boos.audioboo.fm/swf/fullsize_player.swf

Filed under: Snippets

THE INFORMATION

How the Internet gets inside us.

by Adam Gopnik

When the first Harry Potter book appeared, in 1997, it was just a year before the universal search engine Google was launched. And so Hermione Granger, that charming grind, still goes to the Hogwarts library and spends hours and hours working her way through the stacks, finding out what a basilisk is or how to make a love potion. The idea that a wizard in training might have, instead, a magic pad where she could inscribe a name and in half a second have an avalanche of news stories, scholarly articles, books, and images (including images she shouldn’t be looking at) was a Quidditch broom too far. Now, having been stuck with the library shtick, she has to go on working the stacks in the Harry Potter movies, while the kids who have since come of age nudge their parents. “Why is she doing that?” they whisper. “Why doesn’t she just Google it?”

That the reality of machines can outpace the imagination of magic, and in so short a time, does tend to lend weight to the claim that the technological shifts in communication we’re living with are unprecedented. It isn’t just that we’ve lived one technological revolution among many; it’s that our technological revolution is the big social revolution that we live with. The past twenty years have seen a revolution less in morals, which have remained mostly static, than in means: you could already say “fuck” on HBO back in the eighties; the change has been our ability to tweet or IM or text it. The set subject of our novelists is information; the set obsession of our dons is what it does to our intelligence.

The scale of the transformation is such that an ever-expanding literature has emerged to censure or celebrate it. A series of books explaining why books no longer matter is a paradox that Chesterton would have found implausible, yet there they are, and they come in the typical flavors: the eulogistic, the alarmed, the sober, and the gleeful. When the electric toaster was invented, there were, no doubt, books that said that the toaster would open up horizons for breakfast undreamed of in the days of burning bread over an open flame; books that told you that the toaster would bring an end to the days of creative breakfast, since our children, growing up with uniformly sliced bread, made to fit a single opening, would never know what a loaf of their own was like; and books that told you that sometimes the toaster would make breakfast better and sometimes it would make breakfast worse, and that the cost for finding this out would be the price of the book you’d just bought.

All three kinds appear among the new books about the Internet: call them the Never-Betters, the Better-Nevers, and the Ever-Wasers. The Never-Betters believe that we’re on the brink of a new utopia, where information will be free and democratic, news will be made from the bottom up, love will reign, and cookies will bake themselves. The Better-Nevers think that we would have been better off if the whole thing had never happened, that the world that is coming to an end is superior to the one that is taking its place, and that, at a minimum, books and magazines create private space for minds in ways that twenty-second bursts of information don’t. The Ever-Wasers insist that at any moment in modernity something like this is going on, and that a new way of organizing data and connecting users is always thrilling to some and chilling to others—that something like this is going on is exactly what makes it a modern moment. One’s hopes rest with the Never-Betters; one’s head with the Ever-Wasers; and one’s heart? Well, twenty or so books in, one’s heart tends to move toward the Better-Nevers, and then bounce back toward someplace that looks more like home.

Among the Never-Betters, the N.Y.U. professor Clay Shirky—the author of “Cognitive Surplus” and many articles and blog posts proclaiming the coming of the digital millennium—is the breeziest and seemingly most self-confident. “Seemingly,” because there is an element of overdone provocation in his stuff (So people aren’t reading Tolstoy? Well, Tolstoy sucks) that suggests something a little nervous going on underneath. Shirky believes that we are on the crest of an ever-surging wave of democratized information: the Gutenberg printing press produced the Reformation, which produced the Scientific Revolution, which produced the Enlightenment, which produced the Internet, each move more liberating than the one before. Though it may take a little time, the new connective technology, by joining people together in new communities and in new ways, is bound to make for more freedom. It’s theWired version of Whig history: ever better, onward and upward, progress unstopped. In John Brockman’s anthology “Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?,” the evolutionary psychologist John Tooby shares the excitement—“We see all around us transformations in the making that will rival or exceed the printing revolution”—and makes the same extended parallel to Gutenberg: “Printing ignited the previously wasted intellectual potential of huge segments of the population. . . . Freedom of thought and speech—where they exist—were unforeseen offspring of the printing press.”

Shirky’s and Tooby’s version of Never-Betterism has its excitements, but the history it uses seems to have been taken from the back of a cereal box. The idea, for instance, that the printing press rapidly gave birth to a new order of information, democratic and bottom-up, is a cruel cartoon of the truth. If the printing press did propel the Reformation, one of the biggest ideas it propelled was Luther’s newly invented absolutist anti-Semitism. And what followed the Reformation wasn’t the Enlightenment, a new era of openness and freely disseminated knowledge. What followed the Reformation was, actually, the Counter-Reformation, which used the same means—i.e., printed books—to spread ideas about what jerks the reformers were, and unleashed a hundred years of religious warfare. In the seventeen-fifties, more than two centuries later, Voltaire was still writing in a book about the horrors of those other books that urged burning men alive in auto-da-fé. Buried in Tooby’s little parenthetical—“where they exist”—are millions of human bodies. If ideas of democracy and freedom emerged at the end of the printing-press era, it wasn’t by some technological logic but because of parallel inventions, like the ideas of limited government and religious tolerance, very hard won from history.

Of course, if you stretch out the time scale enough, and are sufficiently casual about causes, you can give the printing press credit for anything you like. But all the media of modern consciousness—from the printing press to radio and the movies—were used just as readily by authoritarian reactionaries, and then by modern totalitarians, to reduce liberty and enforce conformity as they ever were by libertarians to expand it. As Andrew Pettegree shows in his fine new study, “The Book in the Renaissance,” the mainstay of the printing revolution in seventeenth-century Europe was not dissident pamphlets but royal edicts, printed by the thousand: almost all the new media of that day were working, in essence, for kinglouis.gov.

Even later, full-fledged totalitarian societies didn’t burn books. They burned some books, while keeping the printing presses running off such quantities that by the mid-fifties Stalin was said to have more books in print than Agatha Christie. (Recall that in “1984” Winston’s girlfriend works for the Big Brother publishing house.) If you’re going to give the printed book, or any other machine-made thing, credit for all the good things that have happened, you have to hold it accountable for the bad stuff, too. The Internet may make for more freedom a hundred years from now, but there’s no historical law that says it has to.

Many of the more knowing Never-Betters turn for cheer not to messy history and mixed-up politics but to psychology—to the actual expansion of our minds. The argument, advanced in Andy Clark’s “Supersizing the Mind” and in Robert K. Logan’s “The Sixth Language,” begins with the claim that cognition is not a little processing program that takes place inside your head, Robby the Robot style. It is a constant flow of information, memory, plans, and physical movements, in which as much thinking goes on out there as in here. If television produced the global village, the Internet produces the global psyche: everyone keyed in like a neuron, so that to the eyes of a watching Martian we are really part of a single planetary brain. Contraptions don’t change consciousness; contraptions are part of consciousness. We may not act better than we used to, but we sure think differently than we did.

Cognitive entanglement, after all, is the rule of life. My memories and my wife’s intermingle. When I can’t recall a name or a date, I don’t look it up; I just ask her. Our machines, in this way, become our substitute spouses and plug-in companions. Jerry Seinfeld said that the public library was everyone’s pathetic friend, giving up its books at a casual request and asking you only to please return them in a month or so. Google is really the world’s Thurber wife: smiling patiently and smugly as she explains what the difference is between eulogy and elegy and what the best route is to that little diner outside Hackensack. The new age is one in which we have a know-it-all spouse at our fingertips.

But, if cognitive entanglement exists, so does cognitive exasperation. Husbands and wives deny each other’s memories as much as they depend on them. That’s fine until it really counts (say, in divorce court). In a practical, immediate way, one sees the limits of the so-called “extended mind” clearly in the mob-made Wikipedia, the perfect product of that new vast, supersized cognition: when there’s easy agreement, it’s fine, and when there’s widespread disagreement on values or facts, as with, say, the origins of capitalism, it’s fine, too; you get both sides. The trouble comes when one side is right and the other side is wrong and doesn’t know it. The Shakespeare authorship page and the Shroud of Turin page are scenes of constant conflict and are packed with unreliable information. Creationists crowd cyberspace every bit as effectively as evolutionists, and extend their minds just as fully. Our trouble is not the over-all absence of smartness but the intractable power of pure stupidity, and no machine, or mind, seems extended enough to cure that.

The books by the Better-Nevers are more moving than those by the Never-Betters for the same reason that Thomas Gray was at his best in that graveyard: loss is always the great poetic subject. Nicholas Carr, in “The Shallows,” William Powers, in “Hamlet’s BlackBerry,” and Sherry Turkle, in “Alone Together,” all bear intimate witness to a sense that the newfound land, the ever-present BlackBerry-and-instant-message world, is one whose price, paid in frayed nerves and lost reading hours and broken attention, is hardly worth the gains it gives us. “The medium does matter,” Carr has written. “As a technology, a book focuses our attention, isolates us from the myriad distractions that fill our everyday lives. A networked computer does precisely the opposite. It is designed to scatter our attention. . . . Knowing that the depth of our thought is tied directly to the intensity of our attentiveness, it’s hard not to conclude that as we adapt to the intellectual environment of the Net our thinking becomes shallower.”

These three Better-Nevers have slightly different stories to tell. Carr is most concerned about the way the Internet breaks down our capacity for reflective thought. His testimony about how this happened in his own life is plangent and familiar, but he addles it a bit by insisting that the real damage is being done at the neurological level, that our children are having their brains altered by too much instant messaging and the like. This sounds impressive but turns out to be redundant. Of course the changes are in their brains; where else would they be? It’s the equivalent of saying that playing football doesn’t just affect a kid’s fitness; it changes the muscle tone that creates his ability to throw and catch footballs.

Powers’s reflections are more family-centered and practical. He recounts, very touchingly, stories of family life broken up by the eternal consultation of smartphones and computer monitors:

Somebody excuses themselves for a bathroom visit or a glass of water and doesn’t return. Five minutes later, another of us exits on a similarly mundane excuse along the lines of “I have to check something.”. . . Where have all the humans gone? To their screens of course. Where they always go these days. The digital crowd has a way of elbowing its way into everything, to the point where a family can’t sit in a room together for half an hour without somebody, or everybody, peeling off. . . . As I watched the Vanishing Family Trick unfold, and played my own part in it, I sometimes felt as if love itself, or the acts of heart and mind that constitute love, were being leached out of the house by our screens.

He then surveys seven Wise Men—Plato, Thoreau, Seneca, the usual gang—who have something to tell us about solitude and the virtues of inner space, all of it sound enough, though he tends to overlook the significant point that these worthies were not entirely in favor of the kinds of liberties that we now take for granted and that made the new dispensation possible. (He knows that Seneca instructed the Emperor Nero, but sticks in a footnote to insist that the bad, fiddling-while-Rome-burned Nero asserted himself only after he fired the philosopher and started to act like an Internet addict.)

Similarly, Nicholas Carr cites Martin Heidegger for having seen, in the mid-fifties, that new technologies would break the meditational space on which Western wisdoms depend. Since Heidegger had not long before walked straight out of his own meditational space into the arms of the Nazis, it’s hard to have much nostalgia for this version of the past. One feels the same doubts when Sherry Turkle, in “Alone Together,” her touching plaint about the destruction of the old intimacy-reading culture by the new remote-connection-Internet culture, cites studies that show a dramatic decline in empathy among college students, who apparently are “far less likely to say that it is valuable to put oneself in the place of others or to try and understand their feelings.” What is to be done? Other Better-Nevers point to research that’s supposed to show that people who read novels develop exceptional empathy. But if reading a lot of novels gave you exceptional empathy university English departments should be filled with the most compassionate and generous-minded of souls, and, so far, they are not.

One of the things that John Brockman’s collection on the Internet and the mind illustrates is that when people struggle to describe the state that the Internet puts them in they arrive at a remarkably familiar picture of disassociation and fragmentation. Life was once whole, continuous, stable; now it is fragmented, multi-part, shimmering around us, unstable and impossible to fix. The world becomes Keats’s “waking dream,” as the writer Kevin Kelly puts it.

The odd thing is that this complaint, though deeply felt by our contemporary Better-Nevers, is identical to Baudelaire’s perception about modern Paris in 1855, or Walter Benjamin’s about Berlin in 1930, or Marshall McLuhan’s in the face of three-channel television (and Canadian television, at that) in 1965. When department stores had Christmas windows with clockwork puppets, the world was going to pieces; when the city streets were filled with horse-drawn carriages running by bright-colored posters, you could no longer tell the real from the simulated; when people were listening to shellac 78s and looking at color newspaper supplements, the world had become a kaleidoscope of disassociated imagery; and when the broadcast air was filled with droning black-and-white images of men in suits reading news, all of life had become indistinguishable from your fantasies of it. It was Marx, not Steve Jobs, who said that the character of modern life is that everything falls apart.

We must, at some level, need this to be true, since we think it’s true about so many different kinds of things. We experience this sense of fracture so deeply that we ascribe it to machines that, viewed with retrospective detachment, don’t seem remotely capable of producing it. If all you have is a hammer, the saying goes, everything looks like a nail; and, if you think the world is broken, every machine looks like the hammer that broke it.

It is an intuition of this kind that moves the final school, the Ever-Wasers, when they consider the new digital age. A sense of vertiginous overload is the central experience of modernity, they say; at every moment, machines make new circuits for connection and circulation, as obvious-seeming as the postage stamps that let eighteenth-century scientists collaborate by mail, or as newfangled as the Wi-Fi connection that lets a sixteen-year-old in New York consult a tutor in Bangalore. Our new confusion is just the same old confusion.

Among Ever-Wasers, the Harvard historian Ann Blair may be the most ambitious. In her book “Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age,” she makes the case that what we’re going through is like what others went through a very long while ago. Against the cartoon history of Shirky or Tooby, Blair argues that the sense of “information overload” was not the consequence of Gutenberg but already in place before printing began. She wants us to resist “trying to reduce the complex causal nexus behind the transition from Renaissance to Enlightenment to the impact of a technology or any particular set of ideas.” Anyway, the crucial revolution was not of print but of paper: “During the later Middle Ages a staggering growth in the production of manuscripts, facilitated by the use of paper, accompanied a great expansion of readers outside the monastic and scholastic contexts.” For that matter, our minds were altered less by books than by index slips. Activities that seem quite twenty-first century, she shows, began when people cut and pasted from one manuscript to another; made aggregated news in compendiums; passed around précis. “Early modern finding devices” were forced into existence: lists of authorities, lists of headings.

Everyone complained about what the new information technologies were doing to our minds. Everyone said that the flood of books produced a restless, fractured attention. Everyone complained that pamphlets and poems were breaking kids’ ability to concentrate, that big good handmade books were ignored, swept aside by printed works that, as Erasmus said, “are foolish, ignorant, malignant, libelous, mad.” The reader consulting a card catalogue in a library was living a revolution as momentous, and as disorienting, as our own. The book index was the search engine of its era, and needed to be explained at length to puzzled researchers—as, for that matter, did the Hermione-like idea of “looking things up.” That uniquely evil and necessary thing the comprehensive review of many different books on a related subject, with the necessary oversimplification of their ideas that it demanded, was already around in 1500, and already being accused of missing all the points. In the period when many of the big, classic books that we no longer have time to read were being written, the general complaint was that there wasn’t enough time to read big, classic books.

Blair’s and Pettegree’s work on the relation between minds and machines, and the combination of delight and despair we find in their collisions, leads you to a broader thought: at any given moment, our most complicated machine will be taken as a model of human intelligence, and whatever media kids favor will be identified as the cause of our stupidity. When there were automatic looms, the mind was like an automatic loom; and, since young people in the loom period liked novels, it was the cheap novel that was degrading our minds. When there were telephone exchanges, the mind was like a telephone exchange, and, in the same period, since the nickelodeon reigned, moving pictures were making us dumb. When mainframe computers arrived and television was what kids liked, the mind was like a mainframe and television was the engine of our idiocy. Some machine is always showing us Mind; some entertainment derived from the machine is always showing us Non-Mind.

Armed with such parallels, the Ever Wasers smile condescendingly at the Better-Nevers and say, “Of course, some new machine is always ruining everything. We’ve all been here before.” But the Better-Nevers can say, in return, “What if the Internet is actually doing it?” The hypochondriac frets about this bump or that suspicious freckle and we laugh—but sooner or later one small bump, one jagged-edge freckle, will be the thing for certain. Worlds really do decline. “Oh, they always say that about the barbarians, but every generation has its barbarians, and every generation assimilates them,” one Roman reassured another when the Vandals were at the gates, and next thing you knew there wasn’t a hot bath or a good book for another thousand years.

And, if it was ever thus, how did it ever get to be thus in the first place? The digital world is new, and the real gains and losses of the Internet era are to be found not in altered neurons or empathy tests but in the small changes in mood, life, manners, feelings it creates—in the texture of the age. There is, for instance, a simple, spooky sense in which the Internet is just a loud and unlimited library in which we now live—as if one went to sleep every night in the college stacks, surrounded by pamphlets and polemics and possibilities. There is the sociology section, the science section, old sheet music and menus, and you can go to the periodicals room anytime and read old issues of the New Statesman. (And you can whisper loudly to a friend in the next carrel to get the hockey scores.) To see that that is so is at least to drain some of the melodrama from the subject. It is odd and new to be living in the library; but there isn’t anything odd and new about the library.

Yet surely having something wrapped right around your mind is different from having your mind wrapped tightly around something. What we live in is not the age of the extended mind but the age of the inverted self. The things that have usually lived in the darker recesses or mad corners of our mind—sexual obsessions and conspiracy theories, paranoid fixations and fetishes—are now out there: you click once and you can read about the Kennedy autopsy or the Nazi salute or hog-tied Swedish flight attendants. But things that were once external and subject to the social rules of caution and embarrassment—above all, our interactions with other people—are now easily internalized, made to feel like mere workings of the id left on its own. (I’ve felt this myself, writing anonymously on hockey forums: it is easy to say vile things about Gary Bettman, the commissioner of the N.H.L., with a feeling of glee rather than with a sober sense that what you’re saying should be tempered by a little truth and reflection.) Thus the limitless malice of Internet commenting: it’s not newly unleashed anger but what we all think in the first order, and have always in the past socially restrained if only thanks to the look on the listener’s face—the monstrous music that runs through our minds is now played out loud.

A social network is crucially different from a social circle, since the function of a social circle is to curb our appetites and of a network to extend them. Everything once inside is outside, a click away; much that used to be outside is inside, experienced in solitude. And so the peacefulness, the serenity that we feel away from the Internet, and which all the Better-Nevers rightly testify to, has less to do with being no longer harried by others than with being less oppressed by the force of your own inner life. Shut off your computer, and your self stops raging quite as much or quite as loud.

It is the wraparound presence, not the specific evils, of the machine that oppresses us. Simply reducing the machine’s presence will go a long way toward alleviating the disorder. Which points, in turn, to a dog-not-barking-in-the-nighttime detail that may be significant. In the Better-Never books, television isn’t scanted or ignored; it’s celebrated. When William Powers, in “Hamlet’s BlackBerry,” describes the deal his family makes to have an Unplugged Sunday, he tells us that the No Screens agreement doesn’t include television: “For us, television had always been a mostly communal experience, a way of coming together rather than pulling apart.” (“Can you please turn off your damn computer and come watch television with the rest of the family,” the dad now cries to the teen-ager.)

Yet everything that is said about the Internet’s destruction of “interiority” was said for decades about television, and just as loudly. Jerry Mander’s “Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television,” in the nineteen-seventies, turned on television’s addictive nature and its destruction of viewers’ inner lives; a little later, George Trow proposed that television produced the absence of context, the disintegration of the frame—the very things, in short, that the Internet is doing now. And Bill McKibben ended his book on television by comparing watching TV to watching ducks on a pond (advantage: ducks), in the same spirit in which Nicholas Carr leaves his computer screen to read “Walden.”

Now television is the harmless little fireplace over in the corner, where the family gathers to watch “Entourage.” TV isn’t just docile; it’s positively benevolent. This makes you think that what made television so evil back when it was evil was not its essence but its omnipresence. Once it is not everything, it can be merely something. The real demon in the machine is the tirelessness of the user. A meatless Monday has advantages over enforced vegetarianism, because it helps release the pressure on the food system without making undue demands on the eaters. In the same way, an unplugged Sunday is a better idea than turning off the Internet completely, since it demonstrates that we can get along just fine without the screens, if only for a day.

Hermione, stuck in the nineties, never did get her iPad, and will have to manage in the stacks. But perhaps the instrument of the new connected age was already in place in fantasy. For the Internet screen has always been like the palantír in Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings”—the “seeing stone” that lets the wizards see the entire world. Its gift is great; the wizard can see it all. Its risk is real: evil things will register more vividly than the great mass of dull good. The peril isn’t that users lose their knowledge of the world. It’s that they can lose all sense of proportion. You can come to think that the armies of Mordor are not just vast and scary, which they are, but limitless and undefeatable, which they aren’t.

Thoughts are bigger than the things that deliver them. Our contraptions may shape our consciousness, but it is our consciousness that makes our credos, and we mostly live by those. Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn’t really about the quality of the bread or how it’s sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It’s all about the butter. ♦

ILLUSTRATION: CHRISTOPH NIEMANN

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2011/02/14/110214crat_atlarge_gopnik#ixzz1DrREjBQP

Filed under: Article of the Week, ,

STUDY MATERIAL CLASS X AND XII 2010

STUDY MATERIAL CLASS X AND XII 2010

Courtesy: http://zietchandigarh.org

Filed under: Downloads

Date Sheet for Class XI Session Ending Exam-2010-2011

 

Date

Class XI (School Level)

09.03.2011 Wednesday

Physics/Accounts/ History

10.03.2011 Thursday

……….

11.03.2011 Friday

Hindi Elec./Core

14.03.2011 Monday

Maths

15.03.2011 Tuesday

……….

16.03.2011 Wednesday

Economics/Bio-Technology

17.03.2011 Thursday

……….

18.03.2011 Friday

English

21.03.2011 Monday

Chemistry/ Business Studies

22.03.2011 Tuesday

……….

23.03.2011 Wednesday

Computer Science/I P

24.03.2011 Thursday

……….

25.03.2011 Friday

Geography/Biology

 

EXAMINATION TIMING;  

 

(i)         09.00 AM to 12.00 Noon

 

(ii)        15 minutes extra time is to be provided to the students for reading the question paper,  hence Question Paper should be given to the students at 08:45 AM.

 

NOTE:            Examination of subjects other than mentioned above, for example: Physical Education, Pol. Science, Sociology, etc. is to be conducted by the Vidyalaya on the dates decided by RO/KV.

 

Filed under: Snippets,

Date Sheet for SA-II for Class X (School based) – 2010-2011


Date

X (School Based SA-II)

24.03.2011 Thursday

Social Science

25.03.2011 Friday

……………

26.03.2011 Saturday

Hindi

28.03.2011 Monday

……………

29.03.2011 Tuesday

English

30.03.2011 Wednesday

……………

31.03.2011 Thursday

……………

01.04.2011 Friday

Maths

04.04.2011 Monday

Science

05.04.2011 Tuesday

……………

06.04.2011 Wednesday

Sanskrit

 

 

Filed under: Snippets,

Date Sheet for SA-II Class IX-2010-2011

 

Date

IX (School Level SA-II)

03.03.2011 Thursday

……….

04.03.2011 Friday

Social Science

05.03.2011 Saturday

……………

07.03.2011 Monday

……………

08.03.2011 Tuesday

Maths

09.03.2011 Wednesday

……………

10.03.2011 Thursday

Sanskrit

11.03.2011 Friday

……………

14.3.2011 Monday

……………

15.03.2011 Tuesday

Science

16.03.2011 Wednesday

……………

17.03.2011 Thursday

English

18.03.2011 Friday

……………

21.03.2011 Monday

Hindi

 

EXAMINATION TIMING;  

 

(i)         09.00 AM to 12.00 Noon

(ii)               15 minutes extra time is to be provided to the students for reading the question paper, hence Question Paper should be given to the students at 08:45 AM.

Filed under: Snippets

Study materials Class X & XII (HOTS); 2011

Class X Study materials (HOTS)

English
Sanskrit 1
Sanskrit 2
Maths
Science
Social Science

Class XII Study materials (HOTS)

 

Filed under: Downloads,

Way Beyond The Three Rs by Y.S.Rajan

Buy Way Beyond The Three Rs : India�s Edution Challenge In The 21st Century

Way Beyond The Three Rs:
India’s Education Challenge In The 21st Century

By

Y.S.Rajan

Penguin Books, New Delhi

Library Call No: 379.54  RAJ-W

(Visit the Library to read the Book)

About the Book :
The education of their children is of paramount importance to all Indian parents. They spend tens of thousands of crores each year to get their young educated. The country fetes its successful students: from Class X board toppers and those who crack the IIT JEE to those who clear the civil-services examination.
Yet things on the ground are dire.
About 70 per cent of all students (in villages, towns and cities) have to make do with inferior schooling. Metropolitan newspapers are full of the difficulty of getting a nursery seat in a good school. And while there is a seat crunch in the better colleges too, only 10 per cent of all students between the ages of 18 and 21 are enrolled in college. Crores of educated India discover too late that they do not have the skills to land a suitable job.
Y. S. Rajan examines the gamut of issues involved in India s efforts to educate its young people and the work required to fix schools, vocational training centres, colleges and universities. He argues that Indian education needs reforms on a scale comparable to those which freed the economy of the shackles of the licence-permit raj almost twenty years ago.
About the Author :
Y. S. Rajan is a physicist by training. He has made key contributions to space research, technology and applications since 1964 and continues to be an expert on space matters. As scientific secretary, Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), he was responsible for a combination of scientific, technical, administrative, planning, policy and international cooperation matters from 1976 to 1988. Since then, he has held various other positions of responsibility related to science and technology, and academia. He was vice-chancellor, Punjab Technology University from 2002 04. Rajan has written on a variety of subjects, including science, technology, business, youth, leadership, social and ethical issues, and several poetry books in Tamil and English. He co-wrote the books India 2020 and The Scientific Indian with A. P. J. Abdul Kalam. Rajan is currently Dr Vikram Sarabhai Distinguished Professor at ISRO Headquarters in Bangalore.

Courtesy: http://www.crossword.in

 

Filed under: Book of the week, ,

Archives

Reading4Pleasure School 2020

Reading 4 Pleasure School 2020 Award

INTERACTIVES

KVPattom Library on Phone

Real time News on Kendriya Vidyalayas on the web

KV Pattom Karaoke

Library YouTube Channel

Little Open Library (LOLib)

Tools for Every Teacher (TET)

Follow Us on Twitter

Infobreak

Infobreak

Face a Book Challenge

e-reading Hub @ Your Library

Learn anything freely with Khan Academy Library of Content

A free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.

Interactive challenges, assessments, and videos, on any topic of your interest.

Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8002 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com