Library@Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom

Where Minds meet and Ideas pop up !

Reading Day Quiz 2017: Winners

First:Gauri Manoj, VIII C

Second: Nikita Nair S., VII D

Third: Ayen Hashmi, VIII A

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Filed under: Winners of library competitions

‘Little Open Library’ inaugurated

Adv. V. K. Prasanth, Mayor, Thiruvananthapuram city Corporation inaugurated the “Little Open Library” (LOLib), an open, free and voluntary book exchange initiative at KV Pattom on Reading Day, 19 June 2017.

The prime objective of LOLib is to share one’s favourite books with the community. Anyone may take a book from the LOLib. But she or he has to leave a book in return, which may be taken by someone else. Students are inspired to exchange any number of good books in this Little Open Library. The project was conceived and implemented by Shri S. L. Faisal, Librarian, under the guidance of Shri S. Ajayakumar, Principal of the school.

In his speech, Adv. V. K. Prasanth urged students to wisely choose their reading materials and called the parents for becoming conscious about the adverse effects of visual media.

The Mayor also inaugurated the Reading Week Celebrations and the activities of various Clubs of the school. Shri S. Ajayakumar, Principal, welcomed the chief guest and Shri R. John, Senior Teacher proposed the vote of thanks. Dr. S. D. Rani, Vice Principal (Shift-II) and Smt S. Shyla, Head Mistress were also present.

Filed under: Library activities, Snippets

City Mayor to inaugurate National Reading Week (19-25, 2017) Celebrations and the ‘Little Open Library’

indexThe National Reading Week (19-25 June) Celebrations will be inaugurated by Adv.  V. K. Prasanth, Honourable Mayor, Thiruvananthapuram City Corporation on 19 June 2017 at 11.00 am.

The Mayor will formally inaugurate the ‘Little Open Library‘ (LOLib), an open, free and voluntary community book exchange initiative.

In connection with the National Reading Week , the library is conducting the following competitions. Interested students may register their names on or before 19 June 2017.

  1. Reading Day Quiz (Class VI-VIII), June 20, 2017; 3rd  Period in the Library
  2. Essay Writing (Class IX-XII),“Reading in the Digital Age”, June 21, 2017; 7th  Period in the Library.
  3. Story Telling (Class IV-V), June 20-21, 2017; Primary Section
  4. 50 Word Mini Story Writing (Digital), Open to Class VI-XII students & Staff (E-Mail your entries to librarykvpattom@gmail.com OR SMS/WhatsApp to 9447699724, Last Date: 22 July 2017; 11pm)

 

Filed under: Library activities

Split-up Syllabus for class III-X (2017-’18)

kvs-split-up-syllabus-2017-18

Filed under: Downloads

‘Little Open Library’ (LOLib) at KV Pattom

 

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Little Open Library (LOLib) is an open, free and voluntary community book exchange initiative, launched by the Library of Kendriya Vidyalaya Pattom in 2017.

The prime objective of LOLib is to share one’s favourite books with the community.

Anyone may take a book from the LOLib. But she or he has to leave a book in return, which may be taken by someone. You are welcome to exchange any number of good books in this Little Open Library.

The LOLib will be open shortly at two locations in the school campus. One in the Secondary Block and the other one in the Primary Block.

All are welcome to donate books to fill the LOLib for making it ready for the inauguration.

For more details contact 9447699724/librarykvpattom@gmail.com
(The project is inspired by the “Little Free Library” movement)

Filed under: Library activities, Snippets

Why we need to empower the tech ecosystem in India

With almost every vertical market being transformed by digital technologies, the nature of businesses is changing. To enable the delivery of innovative new services as well as to optimise internal working processes, every sector has to evolve in line with the changing landscape.

Why is this happening, and why now? At the very heart of digital transformation, is data. With the swift and rampant adoption of automation and technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), the world is producing more data than ever before in history. To deal with the data deluge in a way that it can be harnessed to a business outcome is the need of the hour.

For example, reskilling the entire tech workforces with competencies in complex subjects such as Data Science and Machine Learning is easier said than done. However, it is undeniably the need of the hour.

Indian firms must make top priorities of adopting analytics and improving the skills of employees across the organisation, something that has been reinforced by the 2017 Forbes Insights-EY report on analytics. How can we empower the tech ecosystem, whether it is students, entrepreneurs or organisations, to prepare themselves for the era of digital transformation?

Holistic training

The Indian Government’s Smart Cities initiative created a buzz around the country with IoT being touted as the torchbearer for this tech revolution that is set to change lives in India. But even with several companies looking to ‘Make in India’ and creating home-grown solutions, how many tech workers actually have the necessary IoT skills to be able to tackle the challenges that are bound to occur? One of the ways to enable this could be to reduce the gap between technical education and technical skills needed in the job market. Increasingly, some of the world’s leading technology companies are focusing on creating industry-ready workforce through joint Industry-Academia partnerships.

The idea is to provide holistic training to students, in consultation with highly accomplished professors from premier science and technology institutes of the country. To create technology professionals who are market-ready, these programmes evaluate the current academia curriculum required to produce specific skillsets which are relevant in the dynamic technology environment. It is also equally important to ensure the faculty evolves with time and reskills themselves. This is something that NetApp accomplishes through its Academic Alliance and University Research partnerships programmes.

Enabling tech innovators

India has a dynamic and thriving startup ecosystem. In 2015, there were over 4,200 startups, behind only the United States and neck-to-neck with the United Kingdom, according to Zinnov and NASSCOM.

India also ranks third in the world for the number of incubators and accelerators and is seeing a trend of sector-specific incubators and accelerators. To some though, it may look like the heyday of India’s startups seems to have passed, with funding becoming increasingly tight and the competition having increased by leaps and bounds.

In fact, a recently-released entrepreneurial study conducted by the IBM Institute for Business Value based on a survey done in collaboration with Oxford Economics found that more than 90% of the startups in India fail in their first 5 years. The topmost reason for the failure of most Indian startups is the lack of pioneering innovation. However, all is not lost, what with well-established technology companies aligning themselves with specific technology-led startups whose pioneering innovations have the potential to enable their businesses. Such accelerator programmes can be extremely beneficial for startups, giving them access to business and technology mentoring, networking opportunities, infrastructure such as co-working spaces and tools along with market/customer access.

In turn, the advantage for tech companies is that they can partner with and even learn from the startups to create symbiotic relationships. By actively supporting startups, larger tech giants are enabling the development and advancement of the entire ecosystem where innovation is necessary to survive.

Technology is an enabler, be it for business, the economy, healthcare or education. So, it’s time for the industry to come together to strengthen the tech ecosystem at all levels.

With old technical skills falling behind the fast pace of technology, the only way to truly equip our country with the right set of technical and business skills is by encouraging more collaboration at every level. With tech industry stalwarts, educators and innovators working together, India will be truly prepared for the challenges and joys of digital transformation.

By Deepak Visweswaraiah who is Senior Vice-president & Managing Director at NetApp India.)

Courtesy: The Hindu

Filed under: Article of the Week, Snippets

Charlie and Lola creator Lauren Child named children’s laureate

The much loved author and illustrator will succeed Chris Riddell as a national champion of books for youngsters

‘I learned a lot from television’ … Lauren Child.
‘I learned a lot from television’ … Lauren Child. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

Lauren Child, the author-illustrator of the much loved Charlie and Lola books, has been named the new Waterstones children’s laureate, succeeding fellow author and illustrator Chris Riddell to the two-year post.

In the lead-up to the announcement of her appointment on Wednesday, Child took the opportunity to criticise the pressure on parents to oversee all of their children’s time.

“I will be talking a lot about the need for children to be allowed to be creative, without being micromanaged and directed,” said Child, whose work also includes the Clarice Bean picture books and Ruby Redfort novels.

Adding that she believed children needed to be allowed the “freedom to discover”, Child said she had been inspired by feedback from readers. “One of the questions I get asked most by children is where do I get my ideas from – as if there’s a sort of place where you find ideas or it’s a talent,” she said.

A multiple award-winning writer and artist, Child criticised the burden on parents to fill their children’s lives with activities “as if you aren’t a good parent if you are not signing your child up to all sorts of activities or taking them to galleries”.

“The pressure on parents to keep filling their children with information and experiences is too much,” she added. “Being bored is how you create things.”

The new laureate began writing and illustrating books while working as an artist’s assistant to Damien Hirst. Her first books, I Want a Pet and Clarice Bean, That’s Me were both published in 1999. The Clarice Bean series has since gone on to sell 6m copies worldwide.

Lola in the Charlie and Lola books.
Lola in the Charlie and Lola books. Illustration: Lauren Child/Hachette Childrens

Most famous for the Charlie and Lola books – the first of which won the Kate Greenaway Medal in 2000 – Child said that much of her own inspiration came from periods of boredom as a child. “My parents were like Charlie and Lola’s, where they were around, maybe in the garden or the next room, but not constantly interacting with us,” she said. “I remember hours and hours messing about with my sisters or sat in my own room making things.” The TV series that sprang from the books, on which Child is an associate producer, has since gone on to win Baftas and airs in more than 34 countries.

Speaking from Hull, the 2017 City of Culture, where she was presented with her medal by outgoing laureate Chris Riddell on Wednesday, Child said she hoped to work with artists as well as writers and illustrators during her time in office. “I would love to talk to other artists whose work I admire,” she explained. “I think it is important for children to know we have our influences and get inspiration from all around us.”

Child poverty will also be at the forefront of Child’s laureateship, and she added her voice to those critical of plans to scrap free dinners for primary schoolchildren. “Children can’t learn if they are hungry,” said the author, who has worked with Unesco on its Education of Children in Need programme. “How can we expect them to take on all this information when they are going without anything to eat?”

Also on her agenda over the next two years will be raising the profile of the artistry involved in children’s book illustration. “There is this misconception that illustrators are constantly thinking about children and what they want or what’s commercial, but that is not true. Most illustrators are doing it because they need to create and love illustrating,” she said.

The 51-year-old is the 10th writer to take the children’s laureateship, a role that originated in a conversation between the then poet laureate Ted Hughes and children’s writer Michael Morpurgo. As well as the medal, the recipient also receives £15,000 bursary.

Asked if Damien Hirst would figure in her plans, Child said it was too early to say, but added that the attitude of the renowned British artist, once the most prominent provocateur of the Young British Artists, had been an inspiration. “He wanted to employ people who wanted to do something else, who had a vision of what they wanted to create,” she said. “He was not precious about his work; he was very generous.”

One area that Child will not criticise will be children’s viewing habits. TV, she said, was neither good nor bad, and credited watching the box as a child for giving her the confidence to read. “My sister was a bookworm, but though I was a reader, it was not with that speediness that gives you confidence to choose books yourself.” Watching adaptations of books by E Nesbit and others, helped her find books with stories she would enjoy, she added. “I learned a lot from television,” she said. “I learned all about storytelling and writing dialogue, and some of those shows I watched drove me to books because I loved the adaptations.”

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I appreciate there not being a paywall: it is more democratic for the media to be available for all and not a commodity to be purchased by a few. I’m happy to make a contribution so others with less means still have access to information. Thomasine F-R.

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Courtesy: https://www.theguardian.com

Filed under: Author of the week

The Ministry Of Utmost Happiness By Arundhati Roy

Rip Van Winkle woke up after a slumber of 20 years in a world he no longer recognised. Arundhati Roy, the novelist, has also emerged from a literary hibernation lasting two decades, with a work of fiction that the world may find hard to recognise for what it is.

From its hyperbolic title to its cumbersome expanse, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness is everything that Roy’s first, Booker Prize-winning novel, The God of Small Things (1997) is not. The God of Small Things was a testimony to her shining originality, experiments with Rushdie-like nonce words and a heightened reality that were seamlessly woven into a politically and socially bristling storyline.

Her characters—Rahel, Estha, Mammachi, Velutha, Baby Kochamma and the rest—are alive in our minds for these intervening years for a reason. They were exasperating, fallible, endearing, tragic, but most of all, unselfconsciously human. Not for a moment did they strike as insubstantial or hollow receptacles of social and political agenda.

The contrast couldn’t have been starker with Roy’s second fictional offering.

Apart from being frustratingly rambling, the Ministry is shockingly uneven in its register. Soaring to flights of irony and poetry one moment, plunging into anodyne reportage the next, it appears to be composed by several minds and hands, unable to decide its tone and texture. More worryingly, the plot seems to stick together multiple strands of narratives with the merest excuse of a literary scotch tape—without too much care, or perhaps with such exquisite design that eludes the lesser mortals.

Roy appears to have anticipated these reactions already in the coda on the cover: “How to tell a shattered story?” she seems to ask rhetorically. “By slowly becoming everybody. No. By slowly becoming everything.”

That’s precisely what Ministry attempts to do: take a panoramic view of violence, injustice, suffering over decades of India’s history and turn it all into a living, pulsating, human story. If Roy begins with a tenderly imagined biography of a hijra called Anjum (modelled, quite obviously, on the famous Mona Ahmed), her plot soon begins to sprout a million heads like the mythical Hydra. Before long, it becomes an exercise in ticking boxes.

Apart from being frustratingly rambling, the Ministry is shockingly uneven in its register

The Emergency, the anti-Sikh riots of 1984, Union Carbide tragedy in Bhopal, Narmada Bachao Andolan, the Gujarat pogrom of 2002, 9/11, the unrest in Kashmir, Maoist insurgency, atrocities against Dalits, the rise of the gau rakshaks, the saffron wave, Modi’s ascendancy (he’s referred to as “Gujarat ka Lalla”), the anti-corruption brigade of Anna Hazare, the advent of Arvind Kejriwal (disguised as the bumbling Mr Aggarwal): it’s as though Roy pours her years of stellar non-fiction into a melting pot of liberal outrage and stirs it in with some fictional garnish (transgenders, female sexuality, homeless people, missing babies, terrorists).

As if on cue, a blind imam enters the plot, followed by two foundling girls, a Dalit man who pretends to be a Muslim, and a menagerie of animals, whose mute presence provides a welcome relief from the throbbing intensity of their human counterparts.

Tilottama, or Tilo as she is referred to, is unmoored from her past in Kerala and estranged from her Syrian Christian mother (almost a carbon copy of Mammachi in GoST). Tilo’s strident unconventionality is writ all over her. Her dark complexion, laconic nature, alert presence and every breath she takes are burdened with layers of meaning. Her psychic faculties are high-strung: a baby’s bones “whisper” to her in the night, she lived “in the country of her own skin … that issued no visas and seemed to have no consulates”, “her eyes were broken glass” and the “traffic inside her head seemed to have stopped believing in traffic lights.”

She is courted by three men: an alcoholic high-ranking government official called Biplob Dasgupta (nicknamed Garson Hobart by Tilo after a character in a college play) posted in Kashmir, a journalist of South Indian stock but resident of diplomatic Delhi, and a Kashmiri, co-opted by his tragedies into militancy, who becomes Tilo’s enduring link to the state. Her peregrinations across the war-torn valley and encounter with its people constitute some of the most powerful sections of the book, though, once again, Roy’s anxiety to fill in the reader with stacks of historical information tends to dilute the human impact of the story.

What I have said so far perhaps sounds rather crude as literary criticism, but the Ministry doesn’t lend itself to subtlety. For a reader in India, especially coming to it from the audacious GoST, it may feel unabashedly tame, written for an audience who have a passing acquaintance or vague curiosity about the wonder that is Incredible India. If Roy studiously avoided being the literary guide to India for the West in GoST, she seems to have embraced it with an earnestness one would never have expected of her.

If the transition from Anjum’s story to that of the enigmatic Tilottama’s seems abrupt, the two appear to be connected at least by an unbroken chain of stereotypes.

Anjum runs away from home to live with a community of hijras, who seem to be caught in a time warp. They spend their days applying surma, listening to the soundtrack of Mughal-e-Azam, talking about the good old times of yore, making profound observations about their destiny (as one says, the real “riot” is within them and it’s as bad as “Indo-Pak” in there) and reciting Urdu poetry—every syllable of which is dutifully translated for the benefit of the non-Indian reader.

If it’s not the dreadful clichés about East and West, it’s the ones that involve Us and Them that are rolled into the texture of this sprawling Rashomon-like narrative. In a world of binaries, Tilo is the drifter, who is forever lurking between spaces, existing like an overwrought literary conceit or a shape-shifting chameleon who holds a mirror up to the English-reading, bleeding heart, middle class reader and the characters in the book.

For a self-confessed fan of Roy, with dependable reserves of patience, I was on the verge of conceding defeat a number of times. They say the devil is in the details. Truer words were hardly spoken. For several times, I was tempted to do the unthinkable—skip pages of self-indulgent monologues spoken in simile-studded prose by men and women on the verge of nervous breakdown or personal confessions that have little relevance to the action.

When Roy is in form, the crystalline clarity of her prose glitters off the page, the less she labours over a point, the more effectively it pricks our conscience. We glimpse her impish humour and human affinities most luminously when she homes in on individuals and their stories, instead of putting in everything that has ever happened to them to the service of writing contemporary history. Had those precious moments been gathered together with more ruthlessness and craft, we would have had superior fiction from her—not just a gargantuan handbook to modern India and its injustices.

Reviewed by Somak Ghoshal Senior Editor, HuffPost India

Courtesy: www.huffingtonpost.in

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy (₹599) is published by Hamish Hamilton, Penguin.

Filed under: Book of the week

Secondary School Curriculum 2017-’18

Secondary School Curriculum 2017-18: Main Subjects/ Volume – I: English

Secondary School Curriculum 2017-18: Languages/ Volume – II: English

Filed under: Downloads

Infobreak

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Little Open Library (LOLib)

Tools for Every Teacher (TET)

KV Pattom in Media

FaB Best Performers 2017-’18

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Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8004 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

Population Stabilization in India Toll Free Helpline

Dial 1800-11-6555 for expert advice on reproductive, maternal and child health; adolescent and sexual health; and family planning.

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com