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Textbooks’ Digital Future

E-books may be replacing hardbound versions in college classrooms.

Greg Hinsdale / Corbis

Harold Elder is not your typical Apple fanboy. Yet the 58-year-old University of Alabama economics professor pre-ordered an iPad to make sure he had one of the first ones. The device is “something that I’ve been waiting for for years,” he says. And not, to be clear, merely for reasons of gadget lust. “It really has the possibility of making the learning experience much richer,” says Elder, who is considering testing a new iPad-ready digital textbook in his introductory microeconomics course in the fall of 2010.

“Richer” is certainly the right word to use. App developers aren’t the only ones who greeted the iPad’s release with gratitude and optimism. The textbook industry, too, sees it as a way to woo customers away from the used-book market, boost profits, and help students learn better. It’s a pivotal moment for a segment of the publishing industry that has stubbornly resisted change. Thanks in large part to the iPad and an expected rush of competitor slates, that resistance is crumbling.

Of course, it won’t happen overnight. Textbooks today are still bought and sold in much the same way they’ve always been: as ink-and-paper objects assigned by professors and purchased by students in campus bookstores. “It’s a slow-moving pharmaceutical market,” says Matt MacInnis, the CEO of Inkling, a startup working on digital textbooks. “The professor writes a prescription, and the student goes to fill it.” It may be slow-moving, but it’s highly profitable. While McGraw-Hill Education’s earnings fell by 14 percent in 2009 because of the recession, college textbook sales actually increased.

But just ask any journalist or musician: technology has a way of laying siege to comfortable industries. And the iPad may be the first of many barbarians at the gate. Apple sold 3 million of the devices in its first three months, and now competitors, reportedly including Google, Hewlett-Packard, and Amazon, are preparing rivals. Educators and students are enthusiastic about them; at least three colleges, including the Illinois Institute of Technology, will offer free iPads to incoming students. But what will they put on them besides Bejeweled and Facebook?

There are already digital textbooks available, and their numbers are expected to grow: according to Simba Information, which provides data and research on the media industry, they represent less than 2 percent of textbook sales today, but will reach 10 percent by 2012. But in 2010 the offerings were pretty meager. CourseSmart, a San Mateo, Calif., company collectively owned by five of the biggest textbook publishers, has 6,000 educational titles for sale in digital format. But its electronic books are little more than scanned versions of printed works. A CourseSmart e-book includes some neat functions, like search capability and digital note-taking, but for the most part, it has few advantages over a traditional textbook other than weight and price. (CourseSmart books usually cost less than half the price of a new printed book.)

That’s where a company like Inkling comes in. Inkling, a 20-person San Francisco startup, and its competitors—including New York City’s ScrollMotion—are working with the textbook publishers to bring their books onto the iPad, iPhone, and other future devices. The aim, says Inkling’s MacInnis, is to harness all the advantages of a multitouch, Web-enabled slate. That means chemistry students won’t just see an illustration of a benzene molecule; they’ll spin and rotate a three-dimensional model of one. Biology students won’t just read about the cardiovascular system; they’ll see video of a beating heart, narrated by a world-class heart surgeon.

Interactivity, though, is only part of the story. Bringing texts onto a digital platform provides an opportunity to make the book as social as the classroom. With Inkling’s technology, for instance, a student can choose to follow another’s “note stream,” or view a heat map of the class’s most-highlighted passages. Professors get real-time information on how much of the reading assignment the class actually did, or whether a particular review problem is tripping up large numbers of students. All that comes on top of the cost savings: even these advanced digital textbooks will cost less than their print equivalents (with most of them in the $99 range) and some will even come “unbundled,” allowing students to buy the individual chapters they need most for a small fraction of the cost of a full textbook.

Textbook publishers stand to lose some revenue if individual chapter purchases catch on, but they hope to more than offset the loss by attracting new customers. Big publishers like McGraw-Hill, Pearson, and Cengage are locked in a longstanding battle against the used-textbook market, which now totals about $2.2 billion, according to Simba, and from which they earn no revenue. Online textbook-rental companies like Chegg.com offer lower prices than the publishers, and reach a wide customer base. But traditional publishers think technology will be their salvation. There’s no such thing as a “used” e-book, and digital textbooks are the center of a whole ecosystem of services—such as homework-management systems and video-capture technology for recording lectures—that publishers hope will be profitable. “We’re becoming a software service company instead of a textbook company,” says Peter Davis, president of McGraw-Hill Education.

But what about the students? Are manipulable molecules just digital eye candy or real improvements to the learning process? “Technology is never the silver bullet, but it can sometimes be the bullet,” says Diana Rhoten, an education researcher and cofounder of Startl, which invests in innovative education companies. She notes that different students have different learning styles. Some are just fine reading text, while others prefer audiovisual aids, and kinesthetic learners need to interact with something. “In a digital book, I have all of those modalities available to me,” she says. “That is huge. Customization is going to have a great impact on learning.” And if it means getting an A in organic chemistry, paying $500 for an iPad seems like a smart choice.

 

By

Barrett Sheridan

Courtesy: http://education.newsweek.com

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Filed under: Article of the Week, , ,

Ebooks outsell hardbacks at Amazon

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by

David Teather

It is an announcement that will provoke horror among those who can think of nothing better than spending an afternoon rummaging around a musty old bookshop. In what could be a watershed for the publishing industry, Amazon said sales of digital books have outstripped U.S. sales of hardbacks on its website for the first time.

Amazon claims to have sold 143 digital books for its e-reader, the Kindle, for every 100 hardback books over the past three months. The pace of change is also accelerating. Amazon said that in the most recent four weeks, the rate reached 180 ebooks for every 100 hardbacks sold. Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, said sales of the Kindle and ebooks had reached a “tipping point”, with five authors including Steig Larsson, the writer of Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, and Stephenie Meyer, who penned the Twilight series, each selling more than 500,000 digital books. Earlier this month, Hachette said James Patterson had sold 1.1 million ebooks to date.

Neill Denny, editor-in-chief of the Bookseller, said the figures from Amazon were “eye-catching”, but added a note of scepticism. He said that while ebooks had outnumbered hardbacks in volume, they were likely to be some distance behind in value. Some of the bestsellers listed on the Kindle top 10 list were retailing for as little as $1.16. Free downloads of books no longer in copyright were excluded from the figures.

It does not appear that the growth of ebooks is damaging sales of physical books. According to the Association of American Publishers, hardback sales are still growing in the U.S., up 22 per cent this year.

The association says that ebook sales in the U.S. account for six per cent of the consumer book market. One publisher in London said the U.S. was “two or three years ahead of us. But there is no reason to suppose we won’t see the same thing happening here.”

Kate Pool, deputy general-secretary of the Royal Society of Authors, said most authors would be “delighted” to sell large numbers of digital books. “If you speak to most authors, they couldn’t bear to get rid of their old bookshelves, but if their readers want to read on an e-reader, then great. They are in it to earn a living after all.” The market is still relatively small in Britain. Digital sales were around £150 million last year, says the Publishers’ Association, over 80 per cent in the academic-professional sector, with only £5 million in consumer sales.

The Kindle has been available in the U.K. since October, although customers still need to visit the U.S. site and get the device delivered from America.

The books catalogue is also available only through the American site and the titles priced in dollars. A spokesman said there were 390,000 titles available for U.K. readers to download. The company will not release figures on the number of Kindles sold. “We are nowhere near the same level as the U.S.,” Denny added. “I have never seen anyone using a Kindle in Britain. The iPad is more interesting.” Amazon cut the price of its device in June in response to the launch of Apple’s iPad, which many believe could provide a substantial threat to the Kindle’s market. Waterstones has sold ebooks from its website for the Sony Reader since September 2008 and will sell its one-millionth title this year, a spokesman said.

Ms Pool said she had yet to invest in an ebook reader. “I have played around with one, but I haven’t read a full book on one. It is not that I am a Luddite, more of a scrooge, which I think is the same for many people. I am waiting for the price to come down, for the amount of content available to go up and I want to be sure I am not buying the wrong thing. I don’t want to be left with a Betamax when everyone else is watching VHS.”

 

© Guardian Newspapers Limited, 2010

Courtesy: The Hindu, http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/article527066.ece

Filed under: E-Books, ,

How E-Books Will Change Reading And Writing

by Lynn Neary

Courtesy: http://www.npr.org/

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Ten years ago, few imagined that by decade’s end, people would be reading novels on cell phones. A lot has changed in the book world.

"Over the last couple of years, I’ve really noticed if I sit down with a book, after a few paragraphs, I’ll say, ‘You know, where’s the links? Where’s the e-mail? Where’s all the stuff going on?’ " says writer Nicholas Carr. "And it’s kind of sad."

Carr says he’s thought of himself as a serious reader all his life, but in an article in The Atlantic, he argued that the Internet is training us to read in a distracted and disjointed way. But does that mean writers will have to change the way they write to capture the attention of an audience accustomed to this new way of reading? Carr thinks the answer is yes, and he looks to the past to make his point.

"When printed books first became popular, thanks to Gutenberg’s press, you saw this great expansion of eloquence and experimentation," says Carr. "All of which came out of the fact that here was a technology that encouraged people to read deeply, with great concentration and focus. And as we move to the new technology of the screen … it has a very different effect, an almost opposite effect, and you will see a retreat from the sophistication and eloquence that characterized the printed page."

As digital platforms proliferate, writers are trying to figure out how to use them. Novelist Rick Moody recently wrote a story on the social networking site Twitter. Moody says he got intrigued by the idea of writing in abbreviated form to fit within the 140-character limitations of each Twitter post.

"I began to see that trying to write within this tiny little frame, 140 characters, was kind of like trying to write haiku. It’s very poetical in its compaction, and it kind of got under my skin, and I kept thinking, ‘Wouldn’t it be fun to try and work with this?’ " Moody says.

His flirtation with Twitter was not entirely successful. The delivery of the story went awry, and some industry insiders were bombarded with repetitive tweets. Still, Moody doesn’t regret the experiment. But he does have doubts about Twitter’s literary potential.

"It forced me to try to imply more narrative than I could actually include in the piece, because I was so stuck in this little box. It’s hard to have dialogue between characters in the confines of the Twitter box," Moody says. "That was all fun. Whether I think Twitter is going to be a great vehicle for fiction, I’d say no."

A lot of writers are trying their hand at Twitter books — both on the Web and in print — but Time magazine book reviewer Lev Grossman thinks it’s a passing fad. Asked what might have some staying power, Grossman suggests the cell phone novel. Written on cell phones and meant to be read on them, many of these books are best-sellers in Japan. The authors are usually young women, and romance is the main theme.

"They tend to be narratively very propulsive, [and] not very interested in style and beautiful language," Grossman says. "There tends to be a lot of drama and melodrama, sex and violence. They grab your attention, and they don’t really let it go."

Apart from Twitter books and cell phone novels, Grossman, who is also a novelist, says the real challenge for writers is electronic-book readers like the Kindle. He says the increasingly popular devices force people to read books in a different way.

"They scroll and scroll and scroll. You don’t have this business of handling pages and turning them and savoring them." Grossman says that particular function of the e-book leads to a certain kind of reading and writing: "Very forward moving, very fast narrative … and likewise you don’t tend to linger on the language. When you are seeing a word or a sentence on the screen, you tend to go through it, you extract the data, and you move on."

Grossman thinks that tendency not to linger on the language also affects the way people react to a book when they are deciding whether to buy it: More purchases will be based on brief excerpts.

"It will be incumbent on novelists to hook readers right away," says Grossman. "You won’t be allowed to do a kind of tone poem overture, you’re going to want to have blood on the wall by the end of the second paragraph. And I think that’s something writers will have to adapt to, and the challenge will be to use this powerfully narrative form, this pulpy kind of mode, to say important things."

Grossman, Moody and Carr all believe that traditional books will still be around for a long time, and that some of the changes that may occur in writing will be more evolutionary than revolutionary. But it’s hard to know, says Carr, whether traditional books — and the people who read and write them — will have much influence on the culture in the future.

"The real question is," wonders Carr, "is that segment of the population going to just dwindle and be on the periphery of the culture rather than at the center, which is where printed books have stood for centuries now?"

Perhaps we’ll have to wait another 10 years to find out.

Courtesy: http://www.npr.org/

Filed under: Article of the Week, ,

Are ebooks the future?

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by

Pradeep Sebastian

Courtesy: The Hindu

Now that Kindle and other digital reading devices are hitting the mainstream, how will virtual words impact the reader and the experience of reading?

Waiting for a poetry reading to begin, Critic A can’t help eavesdropping on a conversation in progress: someone in the room can’t remember a line from a Wallace Stevens poem, and her neighbour ‘Kindles’ the quote, and in a few seconds supplies the line. All present are duly impressed except Critic A, who wonders if the Kindle has become to literature what Wikipedia is to information: “a one-stop outlet, a speedy and irresistibly efficient leveler of context”. That is, the poet Wallace Stevens had been taken out of his historical flesh and blood literary context, and his poetry turned into a piece of information.

Critic B, noting A’s dismay, observes that Blackberrying or Kindling Stevens instantly doesn’t deprive him of his historical and literary context — only forgetting him can do that. And if young people, say his 14-year-old son, can ‘call up’ a poem on his Blackberry in a matter of seconds, then a difficult poet like Wallace Stevens, always in danger of not being read enough, will actually find new readers. “Such liberation of access”, notes Critic B, “can only enrich and deepen the historical imagination — extending its nourishment to new audiences”.

It’s here now

It was perhaps several months ago that I chanced on this exchange — one resisting the Kindle, the other defending it — and thought to myself: why should we agonise over something that we don’t have in India — namely, the Kindle. But now that Amazon’s international version of this e-reading device is actually here (some Rs. 17,500 later), does it mean digital reading is finally becoming mainstream? I asked two prominent Indian publishers what they made of the eBook, and found them prepared and geared up for the revolution.

Thomas Abraham, Hachette India’s managing director is convinced (partly by how easily and frequently he uses an eReader now) that eBook conversion will happen faster than was supposed in India, but will remain a niche interest with the current device format. “The day real convergence occurs — when your phone, mp3 player and eReader are one device — is when you’ll see real mass usage. Hachette is a big believer in the future of the digital medium, both for content as well as distribution platforms. It has therefore set up a central group Digital division which will manage its whole eBook strategy.”

HarperCollins worldwide has for some years now been exploring ways to work closely with digital publishing partners including Amazon. HarperCollins India hopes to learn from their experience to create and partner similar initiatives in India. Its publisher and chief editor, V.K. Karthika is emphatic that “there is no getting away from the fact that digital publishing is the future of the written word. It could mean rethinking processes from scratch, including typesetting and design, not to mention sales and marketing. And of course, as an editor I may have to reinvent my role to adapt to the new technology.”

Neelini Sarkar, editorial assistant at HarperCollins added, “I think being part of traditional book publishing means that we tend to be somewhat skeptical of new-fangled reading formats and insist that e-books just don’t ‘feel’ the same. But they are certainly a convenience, some years down the line a necessity, and at the end of the day e-reading will probably make book-publishing a simpler process.” Listening to them, I realised what they were getting at would probably be echoed by most other publishers, and that it was time for even the fetishistic bibliophile, namely me, to recognise that the printed book and the digital book must co-exist.

But as a longtime reader of the printed book, I can tell you exactly what I’ll miss from an eBook: a particular memory of reading a book, that specific copy, in a certain way; when you return to re-read a book, the act of reading from the same wel- thumbedcopy. Of lending that edition to a friend. The smell of old ink-and not just a generic book smell but the familiar smell of thatcopy. Writing in the margins, bookmarking and shelving it. As a reader who has cared for books in their physical beauty — fine editions, memorable dust jackets, and lovely typefaces — I cannot help but feel that it will not be easy to replace the sensual ritual of feeling paper as you turn a page.

Inertia

However, the digital book industry is racing to reassure us: CaféScribe, a French on-line publisher, hopes to satisfy the traditional reader by providing customers a sticker that “will give off a fusty, bookish smell when it is attached to their computers”, Amazon Kindle’s screen uses e-paper so you won’t miss white-cream paper, and the Tablet PC has the dimensions and shape of a book. From a long use of the printed book in our lives we know its aesthetics. In time, I feel that the eBook will acquire its own history, aesthetics and culture.

Robert Darnton, book historian and author of the recently published The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future describes at least one way the e-book enhances reading. “An ‘e-book’ unlike a printed codex, can contain many layers arranged in the shape of a pyramid, Readers can download the text and skim through the topmost layer…if they come upon something that especially interests them, they can click down a layer to a supplementary essay or appendix. They can continue deeper through the book, through bodies of documents, bibliography, historiography, iconography, background music…”

But Darnton also points out that there’s nothing still wrong with Movable Type — it has just lost a little to Code in speed and practicality. (Amazon’s most recent ad for Kindle is ‘In the time it takes to read this article, an entire book would have been downloaded’). Once — and for a very long time — the printed book was the fastest and most practical thing (compact, portable, no batteries required) having edged out manuscripts. Darnton believes that learning will ‘remain within the Gutenberg galaxy — though the galaxy will expand, thanks to a new source of energy, the electronic book, which will act as a supplement to, not a substitute for, Gutenberg’s great machine.’

Lingering confusion

I realised my initial skepticism — the skepticism of most traditional bibliophiles — comes from an old but lingering confusion that eBooks equal the decline of reading. We forget that reading itself is in no danger — the freedom experienced in reading is too addictive for that whether on page or screen. Besides, reading makes all forms its own. Consider: the form of the book is always morphing — from vellum manuscripts to wood pulp to pixels, from movable type to the printing press to code, and what remains constant is the experience of reading itself.

Filed under: Article of the Week, , , ,

100 Links to E-Books

Courtesy: http://www.onlinecourses.org/

 

You already know that the Internet is one of the most convenient, effective means of researching and finding information for your classes, but did you know that in some cases it can replace all of your hefty textbooks and reading assignments too? With ebooks, you can read, stream, and listen to lessons, classic literature, poetry and reference books on the Internet or your mobile device. Here are 100 useful links for ebook lovers.

Free

These ebooks are all free, so you can download as many as you want without having to set up a textbook budget.

  1. Gutenberg: Project Gutenberg was the first to supply free ebooks, and today they have almost 30,000 free titles in stock.
  2. Free-eBooks.net: Besides browsing topics like biography, fan fiction, games, history or tutorials, you can submit your own ebook, too.
  3. ManyBooks.net: You can conduct an advanced search, type in a title or author, browse categories or select books by language, from Finnish to Bulgarian to Catalan to Swedish.
  4. DailyLit: Get free downloads sent to your e-mail by RSS feed.
  5. iBiblio: Find archives, ebooks, tutorials, language books and more from iBiblio.
  6. Authorama: This public domain book site has a wide variety of ebooks for free, by Lewis Carroll, Emerson, Kafka, and more.
  7. askSam: Search free ebooks and archives in categories like literature, political, government reports, and legal and judicial.
  8. Bartleby: Whiel Bartleby charges for some titles, it has a free ebook store here.
  9. bibliomania: You will find over 2,000 classic texts from bibliomania, plus study guides, reference material and more.
  10. Baen Free Library: You can download ebooks for HTML, RTF, Microsoft Reader and for Palm, Psion and Window CE.
  11. eReader.com: eReader.com has many classic lit selections for free.
  12. Read Print Library: These novels, poems and poems are all free.
  13. Fictionwise: Fictionwise has plenty of fiction, plus nonfiction books, mobile downloads and audio files.
  14. ebook Directory: From children’s books to IT books to literature to reference, you’ll find lots of free titles and book packages here.
  15. Planet PDF: Planet PDF has made available classic titles like Anna Karenina and Frankenstein for free.
  16. Get Free Ebooks: This website has free ebooks in categories like from writing to environment to fiction to business, plus features and reviews.
  17. FreeBookSpot: Search by title, ISBN or author, or browse categories like Chinese, Geosciences, hardware, and others.
  18. Globusz: There are no limits on the number of free books you can download on this online publishing site.
  19. eBookLobby: You’ll find lost of self-help, hobby and reference books here, plus children’s fiction and more.
  20. Bookyards: This online "library to the world" has over 17,000 ebooks plus links to other digital libraries.
  21. The Online Books Page: You’ll be able to access over 35,000 free ebooks from this site, powered by the University of Pennsylvania.
  22. Starry.com: These novels and anthologies were last updated in 2006, but you’ll still find an interesting selection of online and virtual novels.

eBook Readers

Get reviews and product information for all kinds of ebook readers, including the Kindle.

  1. E-book Reader Matrix: This wiki makes it easy to compare ebook reader sizes, battery life, supported formats and other qualifications.
  2. Amazon Kindle: Learn about, shop, and discover titles for the Kindle here.
  3. Abacci eBooks: All the books here are for Microsoft Reader.
  4. eBook Reader Review: TopTenReviews lists reader reviews from 2009.
  5. List of e-book readers: Learn about all of the different e-book readers from Wikipedia.
  6. E-book readers at a glance: This guide reviews and compares the new, cool readers.
  7. Free iPhone ebook readers head-to-head: Reality Distortion ranks iPhone ebook readers.

About eBooks

These links will connect you to ebook news, new title releases and ereader information.

  1. TeleRead: This blog shares news stories about ebooks and digital libraries.
  2. MobileRead Forums: Learn about new ebook releases, clubs and readers.
  3. E-book News: Technology Today has made room for a whole section on e-book news.
  4. Ebook2u.com: Get the latest headlines about readers, troubleshooting, titles and more.
  5. eBook Authors: Get news and releases here.
  6. The eBook coach: Learn how to write a successful ebook.

Audio and Mobile

Get ebooks on your iPhone, iPod, BlackBerry, Palm or other mobile device.

  1. Feedbooks: You can download books for any mobile device here.
  2. Mobipocket: Find ebooks and an ebook reader for PCs, Smartphones, BlackBerry, Palm, Windows mobile and more.
  3. Stanza: If you want to read an ebook on your iPhone, use Stanza.
  4. Books in My Phone: Read ebooks on a java-enabled phone when you download them here. You can also manage a reading list.
  5. Barnes & Noble eBooks: Get NYT titles, new releases and more for your iPhone, BlackBerry or computer.
  6. MemoWare: Get literature, poetry, and reference books for your PDA.
  7. Audible.com: Here you can download books to your iPod or mp3 player.
  8. iTunes: iTunes has audiobooks for iPhones and iPods.
  9. LibriVox: Get free audio book files on this site, or volunteer to record your narration for other books.
  10. eReader.comMobile: Get the mobile-friendly version of eReader.com here.

Business and Education

Turn to these ebook lists and resources for help with classes and your career.

  1. Open Book Project: Students and teachers will find quality, free textbooks and materials here.
  2. BookBoon.com: Students can download free textbooks, from economics to biology to study abroad here.
  3. Digital Book Index: This site has over 140,000 titles, including textbooks and a pending American Studies collection.
  4. Classical Authors Directory: Get lesson plans, audio files, ebooks and more from authors like Washington Irving, Benjamin Franklin and Homer.
  5. The Literature Network: Find classics, from Balzac to Austen to Shakespeare, plus educational resources to go along with the plays, short stories and novels.
  6. Free-books.org: You can download lots of history and literature books and texts here.
  7. OnlineFreeEbooks.net: All kinds of business, hobby, education textbooks, and self-teaching books are available for free on this site.
  8. Free Ebooks and Software: Learn how to do your own taxes and more from the books here.
  9. The Franklin Free eBook Library: This is a great site for downloading classic literature and poetry, history books and texts, reference materials, and more.
  10. eLibrary Business Ebooks: Get emarketing, how-to, and other business ebooks here.
  11. Free Business eBooks: This guide has links to all kinds of free business ebooks.
  12. Data-Sheet: Data-Sheet finds ebook pdfs.
  13. Pdfgeni.com: Type into the search box the type of book you want to read, like business education or vampire fiction.
  14. Ebook Search Engine: Simply type in your search and choose to have results displayed as PDFs or Word documents.
  15. PDFse: Look for ebooks, especially in science, reference and education, here.
  16. Ebook Engine: This engine brings up free ebooks.
  17. eBook Search Queen: You can search ebooks by country here.
  18. ebookse.com: Browse by category or type your search into the box to bring up your query.
  19. Addebook: Free Ebook Search Engine: This tool is Google’s ebook search engine.
  20. Boocu: Boocu can pull up thousands of ebooks and digital resources.

Twitter

Keep up with ebook news, new titles, ereaders, and more by following these Twitter feeds.

  1. @AnEbookReader: Get tech reviews, accessories news and more for ereaders and ebooks.
  2. LibreDigital: This company helps people find what they want to read and watch, on any medium.
  3. @e_reading: This feed comments on Kindle news and more.
  4. @RogerSPress: Roger publishes ebooks and has been reading them for 10 years already.
  5. @DigiBookWorld: Read about the latest trends in digital publishing.
  6. @ebooksstore: Follow @ebooksstore for interesting ebook news and releases.
  7. @ebookvine: This feed is all about Kindle.
  8. @vooktv: Now you can watch books on high-quality video online.
  9. @ebooklibrary: This is a feed for anyone who wants to learn more about free ebooks.
  10. @ericrumsey: Eric is a librarian who loves ebooks, his iPhone and the Internet.
  11. @namenick: Nick Name is an ebook addict and mobile fiction writer.
  12. @KindleZen: Get the latest in Kindle news and hacks.

Tech eBooks

Get programming, design and other tech assistance when you head to these ebook resources.

  1. FreeComputerBooks.com: Find magazines and IT books for reference and general interest.
  2. OnlineComputerBooks.com: Find free computer ebooks on networking, MySQL, Python, PHP, C++ and more.
  3. KnowFree.net: KnowFree has mostly tech books for download, plus some business titles.
  4. FreeTechBooks.com: This site has downloads in categories like artificial intelligence, functional programming and parallel computing.
  5. Zillr: From graphics to Linux to Office to Cisco, you’ll find all kinds of computer and tech books here.
  6. Tech Books for Free: From the web to computer programming to science, you’ll find all sorts of tech ebooks here.

Poetry

Find poetry ebooks and collections here.

  1. everypoet.com: Read classic poetry on this site.
  2. Greatest Poems: Here you will find a collection of 365 of the greatest poems ever written.
  3. PoemHunter.com: Download poems in PDF format here.
  4. Poetry: You’ll find poetry ebooks for download on this site.

Kids

Share these interactive ebook resources with young students.

  1. International Children’s Digital Library: The ICDL is a colorful site devoted to children’s ebooks.
  2. ebook88: On this site, there’s a Christmas Bookshelf, and plenty of other kids’ ebook links.
  3. Children’s Storybooks Online: Find kids’ storybooks, home schooling materials, and more.
  4. Tumble Books: This Tumble BookLibrary features fun, animated, talking picture books.
  5. Raz-Kids.com: This is another interactive kids’ book site that helps kids learn to read.
  6. Children’s Books Online: the Rosetta Project, Inc.: Here you’ll find loads of books and translations for kids.
  7. Read.gov: From children’s classics to in-progress digital books, Read.gov has excellent ebook resources.
  8. Storyline Online: The Screen Actors Guild Foundation presents Storyline Online with streaming videos of actors reading children’s books.

Miscellaneous

From social networking and ebooks to bundles of books, turn here.

  1. Scribd: This ebook finder and social network shares what people are currently reading, and lets you upload your own book.
  2. Diesel: Diesel has 500,000 ebook store downloads, including custom bundles, mobile downloads and some free titles.
  3. eBooks.com: Get NYT bestsellers for $9.99 each, plus all kinds of academic ebooks, non-fiction and more.

 

Courtesy: http://www.onlinecourses.org/

Filed under: E-Books, , , ,

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Child Line (1098)

CHILDLINE 1098 service is a 24 hour free emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection.

CBSE Toll Free Tele/Online Helpline

Students can call 1800 11 8004 from any part of the country. The operators will answer general queries and also connect them to the counselors for psychological counseling. The helpline will be operational from 08 a.m to 10 p.m. On-line counseling on: counselling.cecbse@gmail.com

Population Stabilization in India Toll Free Helpline

Dial 1800-11-6555 for expert advice on reproductive, maternal and child health; adolescent and sexual health; and family planning.

S. L. FAISAL
Librarian
Kendriya Vidyalaya (Shift-I)
Pattom
Thiruvananthapuram-695 004
Kerala India

Mail: librarykvpattom at gmail.com